Thinking Out Loud

February 4, 2016

When Pastors and Church Leaders Tell Lies

Filed under: Christianity, Church, ministry — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 9:36 am

There is a general perception that policeman can run red lights and drive in excess of the speed limit, but it’s not the case. True, there are circumstances that might force someone in law enforcement to do either or both of these things, but generally, they are not above the law and not immune to prosecution if they are breaking the rules unnecessarily.

look closelySimilarly, one often runs up against people in church leadership who feel that situations require them to, for lack of a better word, make stuff up. A policy that exists absolutely nowhere in writing is suddenly invoked for the sake of convenience. Information important to a particular facet of church life is withheld for the sake of expediency.

When pastors misrepresent situations on a national or megachurch level — i.e. recent instances of book plagiarism — there are watchdog ministries that will call them out on it. When it happens at a local church level, we might hear of it through survivor and church abuse blogs.

Often however, the situations play out quietly at a local assembly level and in many cases, the parishioners don’t even know they’re being lied to. For example…

• • •

Anne had served her local church’s worship team for many years and helped in their transition from a hymn-based music format to a church known for leading the way in modern worship. She followed her husband to another church for a year, then returned for several years, and then disappeared to help with an inner-city church plant. Now she was ready to return and jump in with both feet.

Instead, summoned to a late-night meeting with a church deacon, she was told that her present status was: Visitor. No regard for the years she had poured into the music program. No recognition that this was the church where she was baptized and where her children were dedicated and where her husband had been on staff. She was told that people are uncomfortable being led in worship by someone they don’t know and they don’t have “guest” worship leaders.

Three weeks later, they had a “guest” worship leader.

It made everything the church leader had said to be a lie. Why do this? Why not simply say no? Perhaps he was threatened by the fact that she had more musical and spiritual leadership in her little finger than… well, you know. This after all, was a guy who, at one time, couldn’t do the “Welcome to our church” opening statement unless it was printed on a card, and yet in this situation, he was in leadership over her.

• • •

Ross was always amazed that his church seemed to end the year with a financial surplus. While everyone he talked to said their church was way behind on their budget, Cedar Ridge Neighborhood Church always had money left over.

There was a regional ministry several hours away that intersected with the life of the church and many other churches and families in their city. Not being supported by any particular denomination and benefiting only middle- and lower-income families, Ross occasionally took it upon himself to do some unofficial deputation for the organization and try to raise both their profile and support. So he asked if Cedar Ridge would consider putting them on their domestic missions budget.

Instead he was told that they didn’t simply make blanket donations to organizations, but gave their support only to individual missionaries or organization workers. Respecting the office of the church leader in question, Ross though somewhat disappointed that he had failed to make his case, accepted the response at face value.

It took a year, but finally Ross realized this was simply not the case when they handed out some huge donations to several organizations that were not even faith-based.

• • •

Sadly, the stories are true though the names are changed. They’re examples I was able to easily call out of memory, but don’t begin to scratch the surface of stories I’ve told where board members, elders, deacons, pastors, church staff, etc., had simply lied to save face or for the sake of convenience.

In the true spirit of grace and charity, I know the people involved in both above stories have “kept these things and pondered them in their heart” rather than go public. But the first example above was done in such a way that was abusive, and five years later, the scars of the late night meeting have never healed. That leader is currently in line for a position of greater profile and responsibility, and it’s very difficult for those of us who know the story to just sit back and not say anything, especially when the individual is otherwise so highly esteemed as a perfect example.

• • •

The scriptures at this morning’s Daily Encouragement reading were so timely:

“Be sure your sin will find you out” (Numbers 32:23).

“Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in Thy sight, O Lord, my strength, and my Redeemer” (Psalm 19:14).

“But I tell you that men will have to give account on the day of judgment for every careless word they have spoken” (Matthew 12:36).

“Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen” (Ephesians 4:29).

 

February 3, 2016

Wednesday Link List

Dinosaur Baptist Church - from Ship of Fools

This week a slightly different algorithm was used to find the stories you see below. Let me know what you think…

 

Pastor Job Title

Looking for more links? Tim Archer posts Links-To-Go every 2-3 days at his blog The Kitchen of Half-Baked Thoughts.

January 27, 2016

Wednesday Link List

In cooperation with Christian Humor, our gift to all of you still recovering from Jonas:

Shovel Shoes

So what’s news? As I go a-huntin- and a-gatherin’ each week, it occurs to me that entirely different things are important to different interest groups within the broad category we call Christianity. There are items here that I would never consider clicking, but experience (and stats) teach me that these are things that Christian people want to be made aware of.  Let the games begin:

No, it's not just the whole "Two Corinthians" thing; it's a lack of understanding of all things Christian. CNN noted that Falwell, Jr. is not ordained; not a "Rev."

No, it’s not just the whole “Two Corinthians” thing; it’s a lack of understanding of all things Christian. CNN noted that Falwell, Jr. is not ordained; not a “Rev.”

Tedious (Yawn!) Job of the Week: Staff at Moody Press proofreading all 1,000+ pages of the index to the John MacArthur New Testament Commentary. “Can we get another round of coffee in the board room?”

Proof reading commentary index

 

January 20, 2016

Wednesday Link List

C'mon, you know the song: "There was a congregation / that met in a shoe..." Yes it's a church, opening in Taiwan. Details at NPR.

C’mon, you know the nursery rhyme: “There was a congregation / that met in a shoe…” Yes it’s a church, opening in Taiwan. Details at NPR.

Jesus and GermsIn case you missed it, we had what I consider our very finest Weekend Link List on Saturday. Be sure to check out some vital news stories and commentaries there, and I’ll try to keep this list here a little shorter.

Remember, there are some excellent links on Saturday’s Weekend Link List.

…The closing of Leadership Journal means, among other losses, we’re going to miss our diet of cartoon humor…

img 012016

 

January 19, 2016

The Good News and Bad News of Ministry Life

I posted this at C201 a few days ago, but felt I ought to share it here as well.

If you knew me many years ago, there was a period when I would sign letters

I Corinthians 16-9

In my mind, the verse played out in the KJV text that I first learned it from;

For a great door and effectual is opened unto me, and there are many adversaries.

whereas today, I would probably refer you to a more recent translation, such as the NLT:

There is a wide-open door for a great work here, although many oppose me.

If you think about, this is the format of every missionary, church, or parachurch organization fundraising letter or ministry report you’ve ever received.

→ The good news is: God is working in the lives of people, we are seeing results.
→ The bad news is: We face [financial/staffing/logistical/spiritual-warfare/etc.] challenges.

There’s always a challenge. This weekend at church, the guest speaker shared this:

The greatest challenge in life is not having a burden to carry.

That’s right, without some mountain to climb or river to cross, our lives would actually be rather boring. Certainly there would be no growth. I discussed that quotation with a friend after the service was over, and he said, “Yes, but that’s we all want. We want it to be easy.”

Matthew Henry writes:

Great success in the work of the gospel commonly creates many enemies. The devil opposes those most, and makes them most trouble, who most heartily and successfully set themselves to destroy his kingdom. There were many adversaries; and therefore the apostle determined to stay.

Some think he alludes in this passage to the custom of the Roman Circus, and the doors of it, at which the charioteers were to enter, as their antagonists did at the opposite doors. True courage is whetted by opposition; and it is no wonder that the Christian courage of the apostle should be animated by the zeal of his adversaries. They were bent to ruin him, and prevent the effect of his ministry at Ephesus; and should he at this time desert his station, and disgrace his character and doctrine?

No, the opposition of adversaries only animated his zeal. He was in nothing daunted by his adversaries; but the more they raged and opposed the more he exerted himself. Should such a man as he flee?

Note, Adversaries and opposition do not break the spirits of faithful and successful ministers, but only kindle their zeal, and inspire them with fresh courage.

I checked out a number of commentaries online for this verse, and ended up pulling out several of my print commentaries. One of the greatest insights came at the bottom of the page of the NIV Study Bible:

many who oppose me. Probably a reference to the pagan craftsman who made the silver shrines of Artemis and to the general populace whom they had stirred up (Acts 19:23-34).

Interesting that what appeared to be spiritual opposition was actually rooted in commerce; people who had a vested financial interest in maintaining commercial interests in a pagan form of worship. Think about Jesus and the money-changers in the temple:

NIV Matt. 21:12 Jesus entered the temple courts and drove out all who were buying and selling there. He overturned the tables of the money changers and the benches of those selling doves. 13 “It is written,” he said to them, “‘My house will be called a house of prayer,’ but you are making it ‘a den of robbers.

I’ll let Eugene Peterson re-phrase the Acts reference above:

23-26 …a huge ruckus occurred over what was now being referred to as “the Way.” A certain silversmith, Demetrius, conducted a brisk trade in the manufacture of shrines to the goddess Artemis, employing a number of artisans in his business. He rounded up his workers and others similarly employed and said, “Men, you well know that we have a good thing going here—and you’ve seen how Paul has barged in and discredited what we’re doing by telling people that there’s no such thing as a god made with hands. A lot of people are going along with him, not only here in Ephesus but all through Asia province.

27 “Not only is our little business in danger of falling apart, but the temple of our famous goddess Artemis will certainly end up a pile of rubble as her glorious reputation fades to nothing. And this is no mere local matter—the whole world worships our Artemis!”

28-31 That set them off in a frenzy. They ran into the street yelling, “Great Artemis of the Ephesians! Great Artemis of the Ephesians!” They put the whole city in an uproar, stampeding into the stadium, and grabbing two of Paul’s associates on the way, the Macedonians Gaius and Aristarchus. Paul wanted to go in, too, but the disciples wouldn’t let him. Prominent religious leaders in the city who had become friendly to Paul concurred: “By no means go near that mob!”

32-34 Some were yelling one thing, some another. Most of them had no idea what was going on or why they were there. As the Jews pushed Alexander to the front to try to gain control, different factions clamored to get him on their side. But he brushed them off and quieted the mob with an impressive sweep of his arms. But the moment he opened his mouth and they knew he was a Jew, they shouted him down: “Great Artemis of the Ephesians! Great Artemis of the Ephesians!”—on and on and on, for over two hours.

Some people believe that finding the heart of many world and regional conflicts is simply a matter of “follow the money.” The point is that we don’t always know and we don’t always see why people are so very bent on opposing us in ministry. Not to minimize Matthew Henry’s interpretation, it’s simply too easy to say, ‘It’s the Devil;’ or put things into some general spiritual warfare category. Maybe your devout faith and witness are simply “bad for business” for someone nearby.

…My opinion would be that where ministry is taking place many challenges and overt opposition will occur. If it’s not, maybe you’re doing it wrong.

Greater opportunities = Greater opposition.

But the good news is that most of the time the opposite is also true.

Greater opposition = Greater opportunities.

Romans 5:20b (CJB) says,

…but where sin proliferated, grace proliferated even more.

Ministry life involves both: Great opportunities for harvest and life change, and many who would rather keep the status quo.

 

 

 

 

January 16, 2016

Weekend Link List

Wheaton Record Jan 15 2016 cover

Anglican Primates

 

January 13, 2016

Wednesday Link List

Bible Loving Cat

While the NIV dominates some demographic sectors, the God’s Word translation is clearly tops among middle-aged male felines*…  

→→ Before we begin the links today, I need to share something with regular readers. In the not-too-distant past, for a period of 22 months, this weekly link list appeared at PARSE, the blog of Leadership Journal, a division of Christianity Today. For a brief period of time, the people at CT were family, and there are several with whom I still keep in touch.

Yesterday, we were somewhat shocked to learn of the closing of Leadership Journal, which has served the North American church since 1980.   You can learn more about the closure at this announcement. Some of the issues and analysis previously raised at Leadership Journal will be incorporated in a new section of CT called The Local Church. You can learn more about that at this link

Now we return you back to our regular programming…

nothing to say


*Simply doing what the internet does best: posting pictures of cats.

January 6, 2016

Wednesday Link List

 

Fifty Shades at the Christian Bookstore

Welcome to the link list for January 6th… I think I’m having an Epiphany.

Purgatory Rapture

December 23, 2015

Wednesday Link List

Cat in Christmas TreeIn his defence, blogger Lorne Anderson writes, “I would argue that when I set the tree in its base I made sure it was standing straight. I am not responsible if the weight of the ornaments is causing the tree to tilt. The cat was not in the boxes I brought up from the basement.” 

In other family pet Christmas tree news, this is not a decoration, the snake belongs to my sister-in-law. Rather similar to the opening picture, don’t you think? I just realized both families live in the same city. Something in the water?

Not a Decoration

December 16, 2015

Wednesday Link List

After the Wise Men Left

You know, a person could just change “Make the Yuletide gay” to “Make the Yuletide great” and reduce everybody’s tension.

The return of the Christmas List Lynx

The return of the Christmas List Lynx

And now, I hereby declare these links officially open.

charlie-brown-christian-content-warnings

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