Thinking Out Loud

February 13, 2019

Wednesday Connect

First of all thanks to those of you who responded to Last Wednesday’s “serious week” of highly focused items without the tabloid-style stories. The stats were encouraging. This week’s list needed to be completed by Saturday night, so apologies for things which broke earlier this week that I’m not aware of. Graphics like the one above appear at the start of the week on the Happy Monday feature from Clark Bunch. I love that type of humor. He will have posted something newer by the time you read this, so here’s a link to both this week and last week!

♦ The Archbishop rides again! First, he shocked everyone with his “speaking in tongues” revelation. Now this: ‘Who cares’ if you’re Protestant or Catholic?

♦ He was doing apologetics before some of the rest of us knew what the word meant. The UK’s Michael Green passed away last week, so Premier Magazine re-ran an interview it did with him in 2010.

♦ Before he died of a lethal injection, Dominique Ray was a Muslim who was on death row. All he wanted was to have his imam present in the chamber. “Ray has exhausted his death sentence appeals and now only seeks to die with a measure of spiritual comfort. Alabama automatically gives Christian inmates this benefit: Since 1997, the Rev. Chris Summers has witnessed nearly every execution in the state, kneeling and praying with prisoners just before they are killed.” The state of Alabama said no, even though the imam already had clearance to visit the prison

♦ …Alabama then solved the problem by banning all “spiritual advisors” from being present during executions; including prison chaplains.

♦ Essay of the Week: “It is an interesting fact that Christianity’s three most famous creedal statements, the Apostles Creed, the Nicene Creed, and the Athanasian Creed, contain no moral doctrines.  They contain metaphysical doctrines, e.g. the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Atonement; and what I suppose may be called historical-miraculous doctrines, e.g., the Virgin Birth, the Resurrection, the Ascension. But no moral doctrines: nothing about the Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, the two great commandments – love God, love your neighbor.”

♦ What will your life be remembered for? Often it’s the things we do near the end. If we start poorly but end well, people remember the ending. If we start well, but end poorly, people remember the end. This article by Julie Roys solidifies the characterization of James MacDonald as a “mob boss.” What a shame if this is his ultimate legacy

♦ …On the weekend, one website was reporting MacDonald was already gone from Harvest. (This story may be updated or the situation may be altered by the time you read this. One of the drawbacks of an early deadline this week.) (For updated news, see the Twitter feed of WLS radio personality Mancow Muller.)

♦ They don’t just think evangelism is optional, but they actually dare to say it’s “wrong.” Barna Research “is releasing Reviving Evangelism, a new report based on research commissioned by Alpha USA. This study looks at the faith-sharing experiences and expectations of Christians and non-Christians alike. Among the major findings in this report is the revelation that Christian Millennials feel especially conflicted about evangelism—and, in fact, almost half believe it is wrong to share their faith.”

♦ Last week’s National Prayer Breakfast. I actually spent some time trying to find a good summary of the event and finally settled on this one. It’s one of those silly “5 things” articles where you have to click to get the next thing, but it covered details other had not, like who led worship and the bipartisan prayer moment.

♦ Provocative Headline of the Week: “Let’s talk about virginity-shaming.

♦ The people God puts next to you on an airplane; those moments when God says, “He’s not an airline companion in the next seat. He’s a mirror.”

♦ Justin Bieber talks to Vogue magazine: “Justin has been especially focused on his own moral development lately, what he describes as ‘character stuff.’ Last fall he made a decision to step back from music for the moment to focus on being the man he feels no one ever taught him how to be, and above all a good husband. ‘Just thinking about music stresses me out,’ he says. ‘I’ve been successful since I was thirteen, so I didn’t really have a chance to find who I was apart from what I did…”

♦ Chris Pratt talks with Stephen Colbert about trying The Daniel Fast, a Biblical diet

♦ …but actress Ellen Page has called Pratt out for attending Hillsong, which she sees as an anti-LGBTQ church…

♦ …meanwhile, the day after The Late Show appearance, Pratt remembered that it was Christine Caine who was the source of a powerful quotation that left Colbert deep in thought for a few seconds: “If the light that is within you is not greater than the light that is on you, the light that is on you will destroy you.” He says that quote has helped him survive Hollywood.

♦ Though it’s still not known how many LifeWay bookstores will be closing, current President Thom Rainer said the company “did all they could” to save them.

♫ Elias Dummer, lead singer for the band The City Harmonic has a new solo album, The Work, Vol 1. Check out the song Heartbeat

♦ Parenting Place: Everything you need to know about e-cigarettes in one infographic.

♦ “Unofficially, Disney World and Disneyland have had Gay Days since in the 1990s, but there has never been an officially sanctioned LGBTQ event until now.”

The original blog post for this has long disappeared, but I can’t think of a better day-before-Valentine’s-Day link: Biblical ways in which a man gets a wife.

♦ You’ve always wanted to find this: The best way to refute Jehovah’s Witnesses on their reading of John 1:1. You just have to memorize everything Donall and Conall say

♦ Finally, and I quote: “A man is suing his parents for giving birth to him without his consent.” An exercise in logic and bio-medical ethics.


source: Southern Baptist Memes

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February 6, 2019

Wednesday Connect

This week’s list starts out like many of them do, but actually manages to stay focused all the way through. Looking for tabloid stories? That contributor took the week off.

♦ Today’s lead item: If “Your church is more interested in defending against the outsiders than finding lost sheep;” or if “Your church is predominately known for its judgment and condemnation rather than its love and mercy;” then it’s easy: You’re attending an Old Testament Church.

♦ A Forrest Gump moment, or a complete fantasy? John MacArthur claims he was with civil rights activist Charles Evers when MLK was asassinated. Evers claims it simply isn’t so.

♦ Essay of the Week: Aging Grace-fully. A wonderfully written memoir of his grandmother by Philip Yancey.

♦ Francis Chan in an interview that “no one in the U.S. is reading” said this about being an Evangelical:

We walk around in America with so much arrogance. Everyone tweets, everyone blogs, everyone wants their voice to be heard. And I’m trying to explain to them: “I’m to shut my own voice out of my own head and trust his words above mine. How you label me for doing that is up to you. I’m just trying to be a person who follows the word.

♦ Retro: Another local church is going back to the hymn book. (For them, I hope this works!)

Our return to the hymnal will not cause us to turn our backs on the use of technology. We will continue to use screens and put words from the hymns on the screen, but we will put an emphasis on using the hymnal too—in order for us to follow the flow of the song and to learn how to recognize the direction of the notes so that we can remain on key as we sing. This will enable us to teach another younger generation on the importance of singing and how to use the hymnal to sing corporately to the Lord.

♦ Just as I Am: In a possibly related article a look at what Evangelicals call “The Invitation Hymn.”

Preaching worthy of the name calls for people to take specific steps. Granted, the response that is appropriate at the end of any lesson will not be the same for each person in the audience. But if the sermon does not call for any kind of response from anybody, it would be well to ponder why it was preached in the first place.

♦ Think that churches are dying in the UK? Check out the backstreets of London, England. But note, these are ethnic churches.

The busy scene at the Celestial Church of Christ is repeated at a half a dozen other African Christian temples on the same drab street and in the adjacent roads – one corner of the thriving African church community in south London. Around 250 black majority churches are believed to operate in the borough of Southwark, where 16 percent of the population identifies as having African ethnicity.

♦ Provocative Headline of the Week: Is ‘First Reformed’ the Best Faith Movie Ever or Pure Blasphemy?

♦ …While we’re on the subject: Do Christian film creators know their movies suck? (This whole article is a great insight to what goes on behind the scenes, and by that, I don’t mean on set.)

Who am I to doubt that? Maybe the Lord did want them to make a film. However, I doubt very much the Lord wanted them to throw together a script, buy a cheap camera, gather up a few friends from church and make a movie. Come on. Be real. If the Lord told you he wanted you to be a doctor, you wouldn’t buy a scalpel and start operating on people the next day.

♦ Which type are you? In what the author calls “10 Contemporary Evangelicalisms” there is a category classification that begs you to put an “X” in the box where you think you fit.  Which brings us to…

♦ Analogy Avenue: “You see, it’s supposed to work like this: The world of churches is like a big mall, and there are many different kinds of stores. You choose one store–ONE–and you go there for everything you need. You are LOYAL to that store. You BELIEVE in that store and what it’s all about; in the way it does things. You persuade others that your store is the one and only store real shoppers patronize. You buy name brand merchandise at every opportunity. It’s your store. Yes, there is a mall, but you only need one store.” An encouragement to shop the entire mall.

♦ Wow! Did my wife write this? Here’s an article that gives voice to all the women who are tired of Bible studies that are about feelings. A call for women’s ministry resources which get to the heart of genuine Bible study.

♦ With an already 30-year low birth rate in America, some residential neighborhoods are lacking amenities for families with kids. Municipalities are restricting permits for houses with multiple bedrooms and allowances for daycare centers.

♦ Pastor Place: I totally loved this short article, titled Fortnight Evangelism. “If you want to build bridges with the next generation, especially the boys, an easy point of connection is to talk about their world. And their world right now is one thing: Fortnite.

♦ Fallout continues for Karen Pence, wife of US Vice President Mike Pence, as the Christian school where she teaches has a tough stand on LGBTI lifestyles for staff and students, and now another school affirms they will no longer participate in events at Immanuel Christian School.

♦ Chicago area Youth Pastor Joshua Nelson who writes at The Sidebar Blog:

  • Regarding the youth in his church, someone once suggested to him they should “just sit on the sidelines until their time came.” That prompted the article Too Young For Church. However…
  • …Then, a week later, the other side of the coin: “Just as the Body is deprived if young people are not championed, so too is the church deprived if the elderly are forgotten.” Check out Too Old for Church.

♦ Who to watch: It’s been awhile since we ran links to the Young Influencers Lists by Brad Lomenick. The last two produced were for October and November of 2018. 

♦ In a post entitled “The End” Michael Gungor says this is the end for Gungor, the musical group. But haven’t we heard this song before? (Or one like it?)

♦ Canada Corner: Statistics Canada stopped collecting data on marriage in 2008. However, 30 prominent academics are asking the government agency to restart the practice.

Once you understand that marriage is a public institution and is a marker for things other than just your own personal relationship, you want to have that data to be able to discuss the other things it correlates with. For example, social isolation, childcare, aspects of eldercare, how public policy is designed around those issues. I think marriage would have a bearing on them.

♦ Continuing in Canada for a moment, this foster parents case continues for one couple:

…In the week of April 30-May 4 of last year, they met with a Child Services social worker. The social worker asked the couple, one of whom is a pastor, if they “still” believe “in some of the more outdated parts of the Bible” and if they considered homosexuality a sin. Last October, the couple received a letter from Child Services declining their application, stating that “the policies of our agency do not appear to fit with your values and beliefs.”

♦ Maybe it’s all Greek to you, but to him, Greek was a lifetime passion. Dr. Robert “Bob” Mounce passed away on January 24th at age 97. [His son, and also a respected Greek scholar, Bill Mounce reflects on his father’s death.]

♦ At what everyone must agree is “a particularly sensitive time in Israeli-Palestinian relations;” the dispute now centers on a new collection of artifacts in the West Bank which some are calling, a new cache of Dead Sea Scrolls.

♦ Leadership Lessons: Are two sites better than one? This pastor confesses to four mistakes his church made in going multi-site.

Finally…

…Not finally. We usually have a number of bizarre stories in the final few links here, but they distort the stats and just for this week, I decided to take this whole thing more seriously and just run some links to some solid news stories and opinion pieces that would be helpful to some of the people who read this each week, even if they’re not the majority.


Two months ago Mark Hall of Casting Crowns posted this on his Twitter account: “Doctors put me on vocal rest but I know there’s still plenty of ways that we can point to Jesus! How do you point to Jesus! Just started drawing again!” (The band has a new tour starting February 21st.)


Yes, they were serious. Now you can tell someone’s eternal destiny by their political party… I followed this account on Twitter for exactly five days. Some of the items they posted were informative, but there was no denying that overall tone of the organization could easily lead to someone’s spiritual demise, regardless of party affiliation. This is what the Gospel of Hate looks like. Sorry, no link for this one.


Miranda Rights for PKs (Pastors’ Kids)

January 30, 2019

Wednesday Connect

This week’s list delves into some social issues and honestly, it was discouraging to include these but I felt that in view of the New York State decision (which we’re assuming you heard) it’s worth keeping aware of these developments.

♦ You’ve heard of Jonah and the Whale; now meet Casey and the Bear. Did God send a bear to take care of a boy? How did the boy survive two days in frigid temperatures; weather so adverse the search was called off? We might never know.

♦ The second coming: Perry Noble (pictured) is back. At the first service at Second Chance, he reports 725 people attended with 18 first-time decisions. Read what he wrote before that first service.

♦ Essay of the Week: In the Boston Globe, the link between religiosity and generosity. “…'[N]ones” will outnumber Catholics by 2020, and will be more numerous than Protestants by 2035….[A] decline in religious ties is ominous for reasons having nothing to do with theology. America has always been extraordinarily charitable. But that generosity has been disproportionately linked to faith. As faith shrinks, charity — and the good works charity sustains — will take a hit.”

♦ No, it’s not a Babylon Bee article, and it’s not actually new. Earlier this week Drew Dyck (author of Your Future Self Will Thank You) posted a link to the Wikipedia page for the Two-Seed-in-the-Spirit Predestinarian Baptist denomination. (Never ceases to amaze me who gets a page on Wikipedia and what they feel doesn’t qualify.)

♦ Bringing the Bible back to school: North Dakota Rep. Aaron McWilliams has co-sponsored a bill — supported by no less than Donald Trump — to bring Bible classes back to school. “‘There’s a separation of church and state, but there’s not a separation of books from education,’ McWilliams said, adding that unless schools allow classes about religious texts, the state ends up ‘establishing a religion of secularism within our school by not having anything else.'” …

♦ …But Jonathan Merritt makes a valid observation “If conservative Christians don’t trust public schools to teach their kids about sex or science, I can’t imagine they want a government employee teaching kids about sacred scripture.” [Source: Twitter.]…

♦ …Meanwhile, Christian parents have more to worry about. Kids are referred to “experts keen to affirm their children as transgender,” according to journalist Abigail Shrier writing in the Wall Street Journal. “Parents said they were ‘terrified’ that opposing treatments recommended by therapists and others would result in their child refusing to speak to them…Therapists and psychiatrists undermine parental authority with immediate affirmation of teens’ self-diagnoses. Campus counsellors happily refer students to clinics that dispense hormones on the first visit.” …

♦ …And if you’re not disturbed enough, CBN News reports on a video on a channel for kids with more than two million followers which attempts to normalize abortion. “She compares having an abortion to a bad dentist appointment and a bodily procedure that’s ‘kind of uncomfortable.’ She also tells one child that she believes abortion is ‘all part of God’s plan.’” [The second link here is to the video itself, which CBN did not directly link to. If your computer is in an area where kids could hear the audio, discretion is advised.]…

♦ …Meanwhile, after the New York State decision, some are calling for Governor Andrew Cuomo to be excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church.

♦ There’s no succession plan. At some point, some megachurch pastors will want to retire. Nobody is waiting in the wings. Millennials don’t want the job. “In fact, we are seeing search committees or their equivalents taking longer and longer to find a pastor… we have a supply and demand crisis. The demand is growing, and the supply is small.”

♦ A former co-anchor of Good Morning America’s weekend edition, as well as a former co-host of ABC’s The View, Paula Faris has launched a podcast for ABC-News, Journeys of Faith. “An intimate look at how some of the world’s most influential people lean on faith and spirituality to guide them through the best and worst of times.”

♦ Yes, you can live without it. An interview with a 40-something pastor who has no cellphone. “I don’t see any negative impact on my ministry. I might be better. When I am listening to you, I am listening only to you. When you send me on a retreat to pray, I only pray for you and for our church…Before cell phones I was not considered a focused or warm and fuzzy person. But now the bar for what is considered focused has dropped so low that I am considered nearly super human in what I can accomplish.”

♦ This story reminded me so much of last year’s story involving John Chau, the young missionary who wanted to evangelize an isolated tribe off the coast of India. Only this time the story takes place in Brazil.

♦ Another website dedicated to exposing James MacDonald. Read the most recent post at Harvest Bible Chapel Fraud

♦ …and a well-known Chicago radio personality who was a friend of MacDonald’s speaks out against the pastor

♦ …I told you so. This article appeared on this blog in April, 2013 and drew 68 comments, which is unusual for Thinking out Loud. It showed where MacDonald’s priorities were then (as now) preaching about money and finances on Easter Sunday morning.

♦ The Bible doesn’t talk about politics? Not so fast. “…[T]he birth of Christ took place in the shadow of the twin pillars of a typical political Empire: economic power and military might.” (This is so well-written; I’m also featuring it Friday at Christianity 201.)

♦ Over at Internet Monk, Chaplain Mike is working his way through the book The Bible and The Believer by Mark Zvi Brettler, Peter Enns, and Daniel J. Harrington. In the third of three posts, he looks at the contribution of The late Daniel J. Harrington, who provides insight into a Catholic reading of scripture. (Be sure to track back and read the earlier parts to this, including the Jewish perspective, and also don’t miss the comments.)

♦ Make sure you copy right: Each year various types of “books, songs and films that entered the public domain on Jan. 1, 2019 — the first time that published works’ copyrights have expired since 1998.” The reason is due to a 20 year extension that was placed on the expiry date

♦ The church abuse story background: For those who want to play catch-up regarding the C. J. Mahaney story, this article about Mahaney and Together for the Gospel (T4G) is what you’re looking for.

♦ Q2019: John Mark Comer is among the featured speakers at this year’s Q. April 24-26 in Nashville.

♦ Provocative headline of the week: Evangelical Christians need an exit ramp from Trumpism. “Some of his evangelical disciples have explicitly said there is nothing he could do to lose their support. Yet a divorce is not impossible, and it won’t require white conservatives to suddenly back a Democrat. Trump’s white evangelical support has already fallen in the wake of chaos in the administration and the longest government shutdown in history. If the walls continue to close in around the president, he may yet lose even more support…”

♦ Book excerpt from What if It’s True by Charles Martin (Thomas Nelson, released 1/29)

Because if this story is true, then the King of all kings, the infinite God who spoke the Milky Way and me into existence — because He loves me deeply — stepped off His throne and embarked on a rescue mission to save and deliver a self-centered slave like me.

What kind of king does that?…

…You and I have a problem, and the appearance of a baby boy in a nameless stable in Bethlehem is our first clue that the problem is out of our control — that after a few thousand years of pleading with us to return to Him, He has come to us. To save us from ourselves.

♦ Adam Ford’s cartoons are too big to reproduce here, but with New York State’s recent abortion decision, this one is somewhat timely.

♦ Great marriage advice from Pat Boone, on the loss of his wife Shirley after 64 years together: “We didn’t have the perfect marriage, but it helps to marry a magnificent woman… You make your commitments to God and each other, and in troubled times, you hang on to the commitment to God, and to your kids. You see the problems through and you find you’re stronger because of it.”

♦ Sadly, another child sex abuse story involving a youth/children’s worker, only this time it’s at a satellite campus of the Texas megachurch headed by Matt Chandler.

♦ Finding that he can’t be a donor for his mother, an Ohio pastor gives part of his liver to a stranger

♦ Attendance was down at this year’s World Youth Day in Panama.

♦ Book Review: Lorne Anderson looks at how the lives of 14 people are reflected in Moral Leadership for a Divided Age.

♦ “If two or three of you…” With this new Click to Pray app you can agree in prayer with what the Pope is currently praying for/about.

♪ New Music: From Tampa, Florida, check out Never Leave Me from Reach City Worship

♪ … also new this week from popular singer musician performer Kirk Franklin, Love Theory.

♪ Singer Ray Stevens turned 80 last week. He’s recorded a number of gospel songs such as Turn Your Radio On and my favorite version of Love Lifted Me.

♪ Musician James Ingram died yesterday. His song Ya Mo Be There was a hit on progressive CCM stations.

♦ Finally, who else but Jon Crist:

 

 

September 2, 2017

Why the Need to Make a Statement?

Despite the presence of other things which should have been competing for our attention, the top religious news story of the week was something called The Nashville Statement, in which, under the umbrella of the Council of Biblical Manhood and Womanhood, a group first organized 30 years ago, in 1987. Its first major manifesto was released four years later, Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood: A Response to Evangelical Feminism by Crossway Publishing. The group’s tag line is “A coalition for Biblical sexuality.” Coalition. Crossway Publishing. I think you’re getting the picture. 

Signatories to the document include MacArthur, Piper, Grudem, Mahaney, Carson, Moore, Mohler, Duncan, DeYoung, Chandler, etc.,; a case of rounding up the usual suspects so familiar that first names aren’t needed here; albeit with Charismatic Stephen Strang expected to single-handedly provide some balance.

One of the two best articles I’ve read on this to date is from Jonathan Martin. He writes,

With the 4th largest city in America underwater, in the midst of a daily assault on basic civil rights from the President of the United States, a group of largely white—to be more specific, white male evangelical (to be uncomfortably specific, largely white male Reformed/white male Baptist) leaders tried to change the subject to genitalia.  Framers of the Nashville Statement have clarified that the date of its release was set many months ago, which makes the decision to move forward with it given the timing only more disconcerting. I would contend that it is not newsworthy that conservative evangelicals in the mold of John Piper and John MacArthur still hold a traditional view of marriage, only the disastrous timing of the statement that has given the story traction in the news cycle.  That is to say, the calloused timing of the statement generates far more heat than the theological convictions, which are not in themselves new or newsworthy at all.

The other article which brings perspective to this is from Zack Hunt.

It goes without saying that the signers of the Nashville Statement see themselves as taking a stand for truth in an age they see increasingly defined by opposition to both Christianity and the Bible. They created a document they believe is grounded in the truth of the Bible, a truth the rest of the world no longer wants to hear, let alone obey. And if they face harsh criticism for doing so, even by other Christians? So be it. In the world things like the Nashville Statement are created, condemnation and criticism are spun as religious persecution and that persecution is a sign they are standing for God’s truth. It is most definitely not a red flag signaling the need for further introspection.

He then compares it something he’d seen before:

…what I’ve called the Richmond Statement appeared in the Richmond Enquirer way back in 1821 and while its subject matter was not LGBT inclusion, the tone, intent, foundation, reasoning, and form are essentially the same as the Nashville Statement. In fact, the authors of the Nashville Statement could have simply switched out the last word of the Richmond Statement for something like “condemning homosexuality” and saved themselves a lot of time.

Do take time to click the link. The similarities — it’s now 156 years later — are astounding.

But why do we need a statement at all?

Doesn’t the world at large know where conservative Christians stand on these issues?

And why do people of a certain type of doctrinal tribe feel that writing and publishing and blogging and issuing statements and having conventions is the solution to everything. They’ll know we are Christians by our words. I’ve written about this before.

I keep going back to the joke,

“Why are there no Salvation Army bloggers?”
“Because while everybody else is writing about it, they’re out there doing it.”

What does action look like in the case of gender roles? I believe it looks like coming alongside people and gently guiding them closer to Jesus. Definitely not offending them and making them run away. Certainly not doing the things that produce this type of response.

Jonathan Martin continues,

Many people feel conflicting impulses, wanting to embrace LGBTQ sons and daughters who have been wounded by the church—lives already subject to so much hardship, including the suicide rate among LGBTQ youth, which surely qualifies as a pastoral emergency—and yet struggle with how to work all of this out theologically, in a way that would be faithful to their understanding of Scripture. At the risk of offense to both my affirming and non-affirming friends that I call brothers and sisters in the body of Christ, I want to suggest that public dispute over this internal matter of Christian discipleship—as important and weighty as it is—could keep conservative and progressive Christians from having a unified public witness around that which we ought to be able to agree, right now. I am not minimizing the stakes of this conversation, nor the real lives who are threatened by it.

And then there is the damage to Evangelicalism that the 2016 US election, and now this Nashville Statement brings. This is the quotation that was posted on Twitter which drew me to Martin’s article:

The “average” Christian in the world today is a 22-year old black or brown female.  She has not been to a Passion conference; she has not read Desiring God or Christianity Today, she has not read your blog, nor mine.   People like me are merrily moving chairs around the Titanic, while the entire hijacked project of American evangelicalism comes to a merciful end.  We debate each other on Facebook with competing C.S. Lewis quotes, listen to Coldplay, drink lattes, and some of us feel liberated enough to have a drink and smoke a cigar while raising a toast to “the good old days.” Whether you think it is providence or natural selection, the world has moved on. The Holy Spirit, I would contend, has moved on.

 

January 26, 2017

Bases of Agreement

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 10:27 am

Disagreement HierarchyToday we’re thinking about the plural of the word basis and areas where while we might disagree on some hot button issues, there are core values we share. For example:

Social/political issues

  • You may be pro-abortion or anti-abortion but we can all agree on preventing unwanted pregnancies.
  • You can be part of the gun lobby or against the gun lobby but we can all agree on seeing an end to mass violence.
  • You can be in favor of bringing in refugees from war torn countries or you can be opposed to it but we can all agree on helping people in peril and praying for peace.
  • You can be for the death penalty or against the death penalty but we can agree on wanting to see fewer charged with capital crimes.
  • You can be for LGBT rights or opposed to gay rights but we can all agree on loving our neighbors.

Theological issues

  • You can be charismatic or cessationist but we can all agree that something supernatural happened in Acts 2.
  • You can believe in eternal security or not believe in it but we can all endeavor to live up to standards which will please a holy God.
  • You can support women in ministry or be opposed to women in church leadership but can agree that God has given each of us unique gifts for service.
  • You can affirm predestination or believe in free will but we can agree there needs to be a time at which people respond to God.
  • You can be pre-tribulation rapture, post-tribulation rapture, or no rapture at all, but we can all agree a day is coming that will usher us into a new era.

DisagreementThat’s a bit of a rough sketch of something I would like to have spent more time developing. If you have better suggestions, or feel part of it could be reworked, let me know.

I think you get the idea: Look for the basis of agreement; find the place where you and your opponent have common ground, because if you work your way back, it’s there.


While looking for a graphic image to add to today’s post, I remembered a couple we had used before and started reading the articles where we had used them. You might want check out:


January 24, 2017

Hot Button Issues

Filed under: Christianity, current events — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 8:10 am

In 1990, the name George Barna was less familiar to us than it is today. That year he published the landmark book, The Frog in the Kettle, which was a sort of Future Shock for Christians. Yesterday I came across a publication which had been given permission to excerpt some of the data from the book and found this comparison, under the header “Causes that Stimulate Action” rather interesting.

the-frog-in-the-kettleIn the 1960s

  • Racial equality
  • Women’s liberation
  • Industrial pollution
  • Rent control
  • World peace
  • Police brutality
  • Urban development
  • Cold war
  • Government regulation
  • Poverty
  • International imperialism
  • Cancer
  • Birth control
  • Sexual immorality

Then, 30 years later:

In the 1990s

  • Environmental protection
  • Substance abuse
  • Neighborhood crime
  • Global economic stability
  • Nuclear disarmament
  • Foreign investment
  • Corporate ethics
  • Abortion
  • Garbage
  • Heath care costs
  • AIDS
  • Poverty
  • Illiteracy
  • Public transportation
  • Information management
  • Water conservation
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Medical ethics
  • Elder care

Now we’re just three years away from a future header, “In the 2020s.” Would our list in three years be as different from the ’90s as the ’90s was different from the ’60s? How many of our concerns then will reflect the great technical revolution that has taken place since the ’90s in general and the Internet in particular? (Though there is a concern regarding artificial intelligence.)

And what would return from previous lists? I look at police brutality in that ’60s list and it seems like we’re still dealing with that. The word pollution in the first list resurfaces as water conservation and garbage in the second list. Cold war as a phrase is replaced by nuclear disarmament.

The criterion, causes that stimulate action is also interesting. Maybe in 2020 it will be causes that stimulate hashtags. I wonder if action now looks a little different than action then.

Any suggestions as to what might be on a 2020 list, if George Barna decides to revisit this?

June 14, 2016

What Every Conservative Christian Needs To Know About The Pride Flag

Today’s post needs a three point set-up. First of all, our friend Martin D. at Flagrant Regard broke radio silence with his first blog post in eight months. Second I believe he posted this before the news from Orlando hit; there is no direct connection as to the timing. Third, this begins with a distinctly Canadian perspective, but I think the rest of it is fully accessible to readers in various countries.

We wanted to share this with readers here, but I’m going to close comments so that you can respond directly at his blog. Click the title below, and then scroll down to “Comments Most Welcome.”

TRUE COLORS: What Every Conservative Christian Needs To Know About The Pride Flag

In light of two recent events; one being the declaration by mayor John Tory that June 2016 is ‘Pride Month’ in Toronto, and the other, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s hoisting the pride flag at the house of commons in Canada’s capital just over a week ago, it’s understandable why traditional or conservative Christians are a tad ticked off.

Most evangelicals and Roman Catholics continue to maintain that homosexuality or same-sex partnering/parenting is not God’s default design for men and women and believe it to be an outworking of the sinful nature. And because of that, they are annoyed at how much attention the pride movement gets. We’ve gone from years of having an entire week dedicated to pride celebrations to a month long event and hey, the way things are headed, 2017 is setting up to be Pride year and 2020 ‘ll be ‘Pride Decade’.

Since the early days of gay activism, the Pride flag has stood as the primary token for anyone celebrating the movement that declares ‘we are separate and different in our sexuality and are not going to stay quiet about it’. The proponents of the movement claim it’s about the freedom to love whomever they want, but let’s be real here – it’s about being fully open in regards to what kind of sex you want to have and with whom.

Stretching from the last quarter of the 20th century and up to the present day, conservative Christians have been angered that the pride movement ‘stole the symbol of the rainbow’ from God or God’s word and that their using it in their parades or as decorations for their front porch was blasphemous and highly disrespectful of the religious community.

But is that really what’s happened? Is the Pride flag even what we think it is?

Here’s a little bit of history:

According to Wikipedia, gay icon Harvey Milk encouraged homosexual activist Gilbert Baker to come up with a symbol of pride for the gay community. His original design was a flag consisting of 8 colors, starting with pink at the top (not a big surprise there!). Apparently, due to fabric unavailability, pink was dropped from the design between 1978 and 79. The flag’s design was left with the 7 colors that corresponded with nature during the formation of a rainbow or when pure light is refracted through a clear glass prism. Those colors are, in case you wondered,

Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet.

But then something interesting happened. By 1979, the Gay Pride Flag (as it was referred to back then – there was no LGBTQIA) was reduced from 7 colors to 6! Indigo and turquoise (turquoise is not a colour natural to rainbows, per se) were dropped in favor of Royal Blue.

Since then, this 6 colour combination has represented the pride movement and has been presumed by most, to represent the rainbow – an atmospheric phenomena and symbol that the God of Judaism gave Noah after the flood. For those rare few of you who don’t know the history – the flood – a world-wide event referenced by many cultures throughout the planet via writings or oral legends – was a real event. The Jewish or Old Testament take on it was that the earth was full of wickedness and had to be purged via a one-off deluge that would wipe out humanity save for one family that would afterward be responsible for repopulating the planet with hopefully less evil than had gone before them. At the end of the flood, and at God’s bidding, the rainbow appeared in the sky to Noah – patriarch of the rescued family – and represented the promise made by God to never fully waterboard humanity again.

Even though this information is out there, there will nonetheless be a lot of religious folk who get bent out of shape whenever they see the pride flag, believing their cherished faith or perceived symbols of their faith (namely the rainbow) are being flouted.

Maybe a different perspective here will help.

ONE: The pride flag doesn’t represent a real rainbow! It isn’t reflective of what occurs normally and naturally in the physical world. It is a banding of 6 – NOT 7! – colours that have absolutely nothing to do with God’s promises or the bible.

TWO: Even if the flag WERE a real rainbow and LGBTQIA folks were deliberately ripping it off from the bible to annoy conservative Christians who don’t acknowledge the pride movement or who don’t wish to give ascent to their sexual proclivities, they shouldn’t be surprised!

Committed Christians are told in Scripture that:

“At the end of time, some will ridicule the faithful and follow their lusts to the grave.” These are the men among you—those who divide friends, those concerned ultimately with this world, those without the Spirit.”
Jude, v.8

“Do not be surprised, brothers, that the world hates you.”
1 John, chap. 3, v.13

“In fact, everyone who wants to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted…”
2 Timothy, Chap. 3, v.12

Bible-adherent Christians should expect to be called out or persecuted by those who don’t like them because of their stance on the Truth of God’s word and the healthy, holy direction God wants His children – his people – to follow.

If you are a conservative Christian who is annoyed by the pride-Nazis (those in-your-face proponents of the alternative-sexuality lifestyle) and their influence on society or the pride movement parades – grow a backbone!

Throw a heterosexual pride parade, write a blog-post about your beliefs or write your local politician stating that you are not standing with them if they decide to ride the Tranny-float down the main drag in your fine city. There are probably many things you can do but kvetching isn’t really one of them. Nonetheless, if you’re going to speak out against or attempt to hamper the pride movement’s influence through legal, worthwhile means, remember this one thing: GOD HELP YOU if you don’t love with all your heart every single person – gay or straight – that wants to attack you for what you believe and WHO you believe in.

We’re told to BLESS those who persecute us* – ‘Bless and do not curse’. Love and be ready to serve any and every LGBTQIA soul who does not love you and your reward in the next life is great! Don’t forget that.

Lastly – relax when it comes to the rainbow. It’s still yours … all 7 colors. It was never really taken from you. It’s still there echoing God’s promise to not super-soak humanity in a watery death. I think it’s more important that we realize that through Jesus, we all have been offered the waters of life. Waters that if imbibed of deeply and consistently – will alter us from the inside out and ensure His true colors come shining through – in our every word and every action.

© 2016 Flagrant Regard; Used by permission


* Paul’s Letter to the Romans, Chap. 12, Verse 14 &
Luke’s Gospel, Chap. 6, Verses 28-36

 

May 28, 2016

Theology in Story

Clear Winter NightsRather unexpectedly yesterday, I found myself devouring all 160 pages of a 2013 novel by Trevin Wax Clear Winter Nights: A Journey Into Truth, Doubt and What Comes After (Multnomah). What attracted me to the book, besides some familiarity with the author’s many years of blogging, was the concept of using a story to teach.

As a huge fan of three novels by David Gregory which use this format — Dinner with a Perfect Stranger, Day with a Perfect Stranger and Night With a Perfect Stranger — I see the value in a genre for people who would never pick up a more commonplace ‘Christian Living’ title, let alone a book on basic theology. This is a book which has a storyline, but at the same time is using the plot at the front door to allow a lot of truth to enter through the back door.

Two words come to mind here, the first is didactic. The storyteller is truly the teacher. But the second, better word is the very similar dialectic, using a conversational style to impart knowledge, as did writers like Plato. This can also be called Socratic dialog or the Socratic method.

The banter is between two central characters, Chris Walker a disillusioned church planter whose job promise and engagement have both been broken; and Gil his grandfather, a retired pastor. You could call this Weekend with a Perfect… oh, never mind; that doesn’t work here; it’s a different dynamic.

Without giving away too much, I couldn’t get over how many of the topics Chris and Gil cover resonated with me. The book isn’t afraid to tackle some tough issues facing the church collectively and individual Christians, yet does so with tact, humor and grace. The key characters being male also makes this an ideal gift for men, something that is rarity in the world of Christian fiction, though I still prefer the dialectic label to override the fictional nature of the story.

While Trevin Wax and I are from vastly different tribes — he writes for The Gospel Coalition and works for LifeWay — I didn’t allow that to influence my reading and it doesn’t stop me from giving this book my full recommendation. In fact, a couple of times my eyes watered as the conversation unfolded. Clear Winter Nights works on many different levels.


Another author who writes in this genre is Andy Andrews. We reviewed The Traveler’s Gift and The Noticer.

Another fiction title that used the dialectic method was Chasing Francis by Ian Morgan Cron.

My review of Dinner With A Perfect Stranger by David Gregory was more of an explanation of the DVD series which came from the first two books. He did the first two books with Waterbrook, part of the same publishing group as the title by Trevin Wax we’re reviewing today; but the third was published by EMI Worthy, who wouldn’t send a review copy, so I did the write up of Night With a Perfect Stranger in bullet points.

Apologies to UK, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand readers for spelling dialogue the American way. I know. What are we going to do?

December 2, 2014

Book Review: Compassion Without Compromise

Compassion Without CompromiseIn many ways, the most epic achievement a book can offer is living up to the rather grand premise of a challenging title. Compassion Without Compromise: How the Gospel Frees Us to Love Our Gay Friends Without Losing the Truth (Baker Books) takes on this challenge and provides a thorough examination of the present climate in the Church and the broader culture with very different approaches in each of the ten chapters.

I tried to read this book imagining its impact on people with whom I have conversations on this topic, people who find themselves immersed in this issue because of relationships with sons, daughters, nieces, nephews, brothers, sisters, neighbors, co-workers, or fellow-students; as well as a few people who are either gay themselves (both out, outed or closeted) or dealing with curiosity or confusion.

Probably some of them would say the book leans more on the side of conviction and less on the side of compassion. I’m not sure that is avoidable, given the context of the larger Christian publishing environment. What I do see however is that the heart of the authors’ intent comes through at various points and there is a solid attempt at trying to be compassionate without discounting what they see as Biblical absolutes.

Still, there are people for whom I would recommend this, even as they find they find themselves in the middle of a situation where they, or someone they know is dealing with either overt homosexuality or quiet same sex attraction. Adam Barr and Ron Citlau approach this book in their role as pastors who have counseled many people on this subject, and Ron brings the added empathy of someone who, by his own admission, was much involved in the gay sex scene before his life changed 17 years ago.

There were a couple of sections toward the end of the book I felt the authors handled very well. One was a dismissal of the argument that many of the laws in Leviticus no longer apply today, so why should we hang on to one single aspect of sexuality, when we are quick to ignore prohibitions against, for example, wearing clothing of mixed fibers? The authors point out four specific Old Testament commandments concerning sex that are repeated in the New Testament. That chapter is must reading, especially if you have a friend who keeps raising this particular objection.

The other section I liked, though it will frustrate some readers, was a Q & Q chapter — I’ve named it that because there were no answers, hence not Q & A — listing all of the various scenarios currently encountered as a result of the rapidly changing culture. (Though about ten common sample questions are dealt with.) I found this catalog of thorny issues and hot potatoes, most of which are not so hypothetical, to be useful in understanding the challenges Christians now face. But I also wished that chapter had appeared at the beginning of the book, and had in fact been the basis of what followed. To get that far in and realize how many practical situations need to be wrestled with was to feel that in its short 140 or so pages, the book had only begun to deal with the larger topic.

Yes, we can have compassion without compromising convictions, but doing so involves a softening our attitude and also earning the right to be heard, while maintaining respect for God’s best.


Read an excerpt from Compassion Without Compromise at Christianity 201


Compassion Without Compromise was provided to Thinking Out Loud by the blog review program of Baker Books.

 

September 6, 2014

Christian Mom Kicks Gay Son Out of the House

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tags: , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:11 am

The video linked in today’s post today’s language and subject matter that may not be appropriate for all readers. Read the description before you decide whether or not to listen.

I decided not to embed the video in question in today’s post, but you are free to click through to watch it as nearly 6 million people have as of this writing. It’s disturbing on a number of levels.

It starts out with ‘Mom’ telling ‘Son’ that he has made a choice that goes against the Word of God. Yes, she is, by all appearances what you call a ‘fine upstanding Christian woman.’ He states that being gay is not a choice. She tells him quite plainly that he has to leave. He says he will pack his things and be gone.

The video — an audio file really — runs about 5:00 and for the first half, things are being dealt with rather calmly. Then it all goes south.

My wife listened to this and noted that “one’s true personality is revealed in anger.” The rest of this is rather hard to listen to. If you have blood pressure issues, just skip the video entirely. The ‘Mom’ in the second half of the video becomes a totally different person. Which one is the real her?

But there’s more to this story. His friends posted a page at GoFundMe.com to help the boy get $2,000 in living expenses having been kicked out. Instead, the page raised nearly $94,000.

That reminded so much of a story Jesus told to help some people understand who is a real neighbor to someone in need.  There’s more compassion and caring coming from the people who reached in their wallets than there is from the ‘religious’ parent who is more concerned with heaping condemnation.

In saying this, I’m not trying to make a statement, or suggest that I am extremely gay-friendly. I do believe God has a “best,” and that’s His highest intention for humankind. But being right on the subject may not be terribly important if the response isn’t Christ-like.

If I lack love I am like a “clanging symbol.” This morning, Chip Ingram explained on his radio show that this was actually the Apostle Paul making a reference to pagans who would use a gong or symbol to wake up their gods. He’s telling the Corinthians that if they have not love, they are no better than their pagan neighbors.

I’ve often heard it said that what is key in life is not what happens to us, but how we react to it. For the capital ‘C’ Church, what matters most is not where we land the plane on the issue of homosexuality, but rather, the nature of our response.

Again, to repeat, the key questions are:

  • What best reveals the real me, the times I give a steady, level response, or the things I say in anger?
  • Who is the example of living like Jesus, the ones who condemn, or the ones who reach in their pocket to help a homeless boy?
  • What matters most, a church’s stand on a particular social issue, or the way in which they approach those their stance most impacts?

 

 

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