Thinking Out Loud

April 2, 2011

To Our Muslim Friends: Everything You Need To Know About Terry Jones

  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Baptists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Pentecostals
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Charismatics
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Episcopalians
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Roman Catholics
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Quakers
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Methodists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Calvinists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Puritans
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Anglicans
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Free Methodists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Lutherans
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Anabaptists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Mennonites
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Wesleyans
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Presbyterians
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for non-denominational Christians
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Amish
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Greek Orthodox Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Shakers
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Christian & Missionary Alliance
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Salvation Army
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Mormons
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Brethren in Christ
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Evangelical Free Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Pentecostal Holiness Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Southern Baptist Convention
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Apostolic Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Christian Reformed Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Church of God in Christ
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Assemblies of God
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Reformed Church of America
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Calvary Chapel Movement
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Church of the Nazarene
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Harvest Bible Fellowship
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Seventh Day Adventists
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the United Pentecostal Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the United Methodist Church
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the United Church of Canada
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for the Willow Creek Association
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Sovereign Grace Ministries
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Samaritan’s Purse
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Wycliffe Bible Translators
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for World Vision
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Compassion International
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Youth With A Mission
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Campus Crusade for Christ
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Youth for Christ
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian broadcasters
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian bookstores
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian musicians
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian bloggers
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian schools
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for Christian universities
  • Terry Jones doesn’t speak for me.

Get the picture?

…And ditto Fred Phelps…Why do the smallest voices get the greatest media attention?

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September 9, 2010

The Book The Florida Pastor Should Be Burning

I’ve been debating for several hours whether or not to post this, because I really don’t want to give Terry Jones — the term Reverend no longer seems appropriate — any more publicity than he is already receiving for his plan to burn 200 copies of the Quran on Saturday, September 11th.

But I can’t keep this to myself.   It is allegedly something along the lines of the “student handbook” that students at his Bible academy receive.  Check out all six pages posted at The Smoking Gun.   (Or this summary.)

BTW, if you’re in the U.S. and think this is a “made in USA” story; you should know that this is an international incident.   It was the lead item on Tuesday night’s CBC National news in Canada.   At this writing, the USAToday story online is approaching the 5,000 comments mark.

Sidebar:   What we’re seeing here is also making this a good time to question the use of the term ‘Protestant.’   We tend not to think of extremists as Evangelical extremists or Charismatic extremists, while certainly some exist.   Instead it usually a group of hardline fundamentalist Protestant fringe groups, who, while far from the Mainline Protestant are simply to distanced from Evangelicals for the term to fit.

It’s also interesting in that we tend to think of religious extremists as existing in the middle east, not so close to home.

UPDATE:  Here’s a “red letter” response to all this compiled by author and musician John Fischer.

September 8, 2010

Wednesday Link List

The long hot summer is just about over, and the kids are back in school.    Time for a look at the pages that grabbed my attention this week, with a little help from our friend (at right) the links lynx.

  • First of all, there’s a live event online tomorrow (Thursday September 9th) night:  A Night of Worship, streaming live from North Point Community Church at 7:30 PM Eastern, 6:30 PM Central.   To watch at home you need enough bandwidth to capture the live feed, and this website.
  • When Chad Holtz isn’t busy pastoring a rural Methodist church, he’s busy confronting evil at the local Islamic Center.  Sort of.
  • Greg at the blog, Lost in the Clouds posts an edgy response to the Christianity Today cover story Hipster Christianity by Brent McCracken based on his book of the same name.   Greg says “I’m sorry, but all of this is adding up to a sorry picture of our tour guide through the world of Hipster Christianity…”   I think he struck a nerve.
  • Students at Belmont University are being handed cash to make a difference.    Donald Miller explains the $20 giveaway; but I wonder what they’d do if — after the manner of Matthew 25 — one of the students simply handed back $40?
  • Carlos Whitaker doesn’t want attendees at the Catalyst Conference to be singing the songs he chooses, so he asks his readers to report the song titles they are connecting with at their churches.   So far, over 125 replies.
  • Frank Turk, who probably doesn’t write a lot of music reviews, joins a number of bloggers who are noticing what can only be termed a “modern hymnwriter,” Matthew Smith.
  • Andrew Jones lists five major game changers that revolutionized who he is today.  People in ministry, don’t miss this one.
  • Thom Turner knows that baptism can be a divisive subject, but suggests there’s room for diversity even within denominations and possibly within local churches as well.
  • If you missed the blog tour — actually it was more like a progressive dinner — for Anne Jackson’s Permission to Speak Freely (Thomas Nelson), you can still catch all seven excerpts by following the links, starting here.  Anne’s honesty will resonate with anyone dealing with various types of pain.
  • Brian, a regular reader of this blog, invites you to join him and others in a week of prayer for Beja people — nomadic camel herders — of Egypt, Sudan and Eritrea.   Read more here.
  • Our video link this week is a worship song you may not know by Willow Creek’s Aaron Niequist, simply titled Changed.
  • U.S. Fundamentalist nutcase Terry Jones is determined to burn copies of the Quran on September 11th — I doubt even the U.S. President could stop this guy — so as of Tuesday night officials announced plans to quell access to his property through an identification checkpoint, so fewer people can see him do it.
  • John Stackhouse has no problem with street preaching, but that’s usually in commercial areas, right?  What happens when the preachers invade a residential street?  That, he says, is going too far.
  • Anglicans in Nova Scotia, not content with the annual “blessing of the pets” service, are having a “blessing of the techs” service for laptops, cellphones and mobile devices.
  • This may be your church, or at least your church sign:  Grace Methodist Episcopal in New York, circa 1922; from Shorpy.com; a classic photograph site.  Middle picture is from the Gospel Mission in Georgetown, circa 1920; final picture is a storefront church from the “Black Belt” of Chicago in 1941 and where deciding where you’re going to eat after church isn’t an issue with the lunch wagon next door.   Click through any of the pictures to see the images in super-giant size.


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