Thinking Out Loud

August 1, 2015

Planned Parenthood: An Alternative Christian Perspective

A guest post by Jim Forde

We first met Jim Forde at Resonate-Greenhouse, a small group for people involved in doing church planting that met every four or five weeks in a city equidistant from some of the participants. This first appeared a few days ago as a string of Tweets (you can follow Jim at @TheJamesForde) and he reformatted it for us to share with you here.


I have watched over the past few weeks as the “Christian” internet has been stirred deeply with a topic that I have been touched by closely. It has moved me and left me unsettled. I wrote about it on twitter and felt i would Storify it to help condense the story.

Jim FordeI once sat on the edge of a hospital bed; in it was my unconscious pregnant wife. Her blood pressure was steadily dropping, the heart rate of the child inside her was inconsistent at best, disconcerting at worst. This life that was growing inside of her, was killing her.

I had taken her into the hospital several times already due to pregnancy related nausea it was usually a matter of an IV and a small dose of Diclectin and she was good to go. This time something was different. She had been vomiting around 25-30 times a day and now small pieces of her stomach and throat were coming up.

It was late in the evening when I took her in and we spent all night there. The morning came and a new doctor came on rounds. I expressed to him that she didn’t seem to be bouncing back and that I was worried she would be discharged without being helped. He looked her over and within minutes things became intense. They did blood work and looked over her chart from the night and the doctor began calling for the nurse. He gave her a series of instructions and told her to get an ambulance on standby.

He gently took my arm and asked me to come talk with him. We stood off to the side and he looked me in the eye and frankly asked.

“Mr. Forde we have one last thing we can try, if that doesn’t work you will have to choose” I just looked at him blankly, no sleep and the stress of the situation (being that it was now the day of our first anniversary didn’t help) had me standing there with no ability to think or speak.

“You see, your baby is killing your wife. If this next drug doesn’t work you will have to pick between losing the baby. Or losing your wife and baby.

“Mr. Forde, we will know very quickly if this will not work, so this is a decision that will have to be made very quickly.”

There was no opportunity to sit and talk with Leah about this, no time to find out what her choice would be. This was on me, and I had to decide fast.

I made my decision and sat on a chair crying. If these drugs didn’t work the doctor was to do anything he could to save my wife. I knew what that meant. It was an excruciating decision, probably the hardest I have ever had to make…

The Planned Parenthood discussion hit me in a different way.

If my baby’s life was going to end, wouldn’t it be better for some good to come of it? As someone with a hereditary degenerative heart condition any opportunity the medical world has to study and learn from the human body advances us forward. If the organs of that precious child could be used to help change medical science why would I be against that?

I am a big believer in second chances, and in redemption. If a life has to end, that is tragic; if that body can be used to help others I am all for that.

 

 

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August 25, 2010

Wednesday Link List

I was scrolling back through previous link lists, and I do miss the more creative titles.  I’d forgotten about “(B)link and You’ll Miss It.”   That was gold.   I’m available for copywriting your next brochure, and for children’s birthday parties.

  • Our upper and lower cartoons this week are from a source I only recently discovered.   Steve Wall is a Canadian living in British Columbia and his comic series is titled Trees of the Field.
  • Continuing our Canadian theme, this week CNN’s belief blog picked up on a self-published book by Calgary pastor of New Hope Church, John Van Sloten with the creative title The Day Metallica Came to Church. Also tracked down more information on his church website.
  • One more item of Canadian interest:  This week — nearly four months later — Christianity Today picked up on the Christians Horizons case involving lifestyle requirements for employees.   [You can read my version here,  as well as my original 2008 report.]
  • Take the scenes from the family-friendly movie Mary Poppins and re-edit them so it looks like a horror film.   Then, take the faux-movie-trailer and use it as an analogy for how some people re-edit Christianity to suit their purposes.   Check out this article by Dan Kimball.    [HT: Scott Shirley]
  • There’s much talk these days about “earning the right to be heard,” and needing to get to know someone before you can “speak into their life.”  But Dan Phillips contends that if he meets someone who is not a follower of Christ, there are fifteen things he already knows about them.
  • Here’s a t-shirt design (at right) I found on a tumblr blog, Churchy Design.   The shirt, of course, is called King of Kings.
  • OK.  I know some of you want to dig into something a little lengthier.  Here’s a piece from Catholic World Report on the implications of the current shortage of organs for organ transplantation.   It involves biomedical ethics, including our definition of death.
  • In another longer piece, Chaplain Mike at Internet Monk traces the life journey of the pioneer of the blended worship concept aka Ancient-Future worship, Robert Webber.
  • For most readers of this blog, the phrase “Prodigal God” refers to a book by Tim Keller.   But it’s also the name of a musical by Brian Doerksen featuring guests including Ron Kenoly and Colin Janz.   Find out more about the double-CD releasing October 12th, and enjoy listening to a preview of five songs.
  • A Sunday School teacher walks into a Christian bookstore looking to buy some novelty items like pencils or stickers for her young class.   But the clerk suggests that’s not what they need.
  • Theology professor Roger Olsen says that for his students — not to mention other theologians — the issue of Biblical inerrancy is as much a stumbling block as anything else.  He prefers to use a different word that’s close, but better suited.
  • Darrin Patrick calls them “bans.”  Neither boys nor men.   They play a lot of video games and watch a lot of pornography.   Their need to learn how to be men is, in his terms, a cultural crisis.   Read more at Resurgence.   [HT: Dwight Wagner]
  • Darryl Dash provides a pastor’s perspective on visiting other churches while on sabbatical.   Only this time they embedded themselves as a family in a single church-home-away-from-home.
  • Darryl also had a link in his weekly Saturday list this week to Justin Taylor’s piece which is an “interview” with the Apostle Paul to try to bring a different form to Paul’s discussion of the law in Romans 7.
  • Simon Sweetman takes the proverbial discussion of “Christian” music as a genre to the streets with a blog post at the award-winning New Zealand news site, Stuff.nz.
  • Here’s that other comic from Trees of the Field (click on either image to link) …That’s it for this week; today marks only 4 months to Christmas, so I’m off to do my shopping!

May 9, 2009

Our Hierarchy of Concerns

Filed under: ethics — Tags: , , , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:11 pm

This post is from Canadian Mike Todd’s blog, Waving or Drowning.

I think I’ve figure this out:

AIDS = The poor. Therefore, who cares?
Malaria = The poor. Therefore, who cares?
Swine Flu = Could be us. Better get on this one!

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