Thinking Out Loud

October 1, 2017

Apparently, I Wrote an Endorsement for This Book

Author Samuel C. WIlliamson

I own a copy of Hearing God in Conversation by Sam Williamson (Kregel) which I thoroughly enjoyed reading. But it’s a manuscript copy, from which I was asked to write an endorsement. And although I’ve held finished copies of the book in my hand in the past year, I never bothered to open the front pages until yesterday. I’m on the same page as George Verwer, founder of Operation Mobilization and Eugene Peterson, author of The Message Bible! I should really pay more attention to these things:

So in honor of that discovery, here’s a repeat of my original review at Thinking Out Loud, which, as it turns out, reiterates the above because there was such a time lag to reviewing the manuscript to the time printed copies were available.

Review: Hearing God in Conversation

God has many means at his disposal to get our attention

Hearing God in ConversationOver a year ago I was privileged to read a manuscript edition and asked to do an endorsement for a book which is now releasing from Kregel Publishing. Hearing God in Conversation: How to Recognize His Voice Everywhere is the second book by Sam Williamson, following Is Sunday School Destroying Our Kids which we reviewed here.

I would expect that a year is forever when you’re an author awaiting national release, so I was surprised this week with the good news that the book is now ready. Here’s the summary I wrote:

In Hearing God In Conversation: How to Walk with God, Samuel Williamson affirms the church’s long-held position that God’s primary means of speaking to us is through scripture; while at the same time, through a blend of Bible teaching, contemporary and classic Christian authors, and personal experience, shows us that God is in no way limited in terms of what he can use to prompt us, nudge us and lead us. Written in a casual, sometimes lighthearted style, Hearing God in Conversation propels us to a place of expectancy with respect to God’s voice; to look for God’s personal message to us in a variety of circumstances; and to be aware that God has a vast catalog of means he uses to guide his children.

Sometimes you forget about books you reviewed, but just seeing my own abstract of it, so much came flooding back. I really enjoyed it and benefited personally from reading it at the time.

Here’s the official publisher marketing for the book:

Christians are comfortable saying that Christianity is about a relationship with God. Yet many might also say that they sense little meaningful relationship with God in their own lives. After all, the foundation of good relationship is communication–but conversation with God often seems to go only one way. We may sing of walking and talking with God in the garden, His voice falling on our ears, but few have heard that beloved voice themselves.

Sam Williamson acknowledges the fundamental human longing to hear God’s voice and offers a hopeful supposition: God is always speaking–we’ve just never been taught how to recognize His voice. Williamson handles this potentially heady topic with his characteristic straightforwardness and leavening humor. This book deftly bridges the gap between solid biblical theology and practical application, addressing topics such as how to truly pray without ceasing, how to brainstorm with God, how to navigate our emotions, how to answer God’s questions, and how to hear God’s voice for others.

Hearing God in Conversation offers simple, step-by-step lessons on how to hear God. Williamson begins with Scripture meditation. He then expands the practice of listening for that voice everywhere–in the checkout line, on the job, in a movie theater, and even in silence. From there, he demonstrates how to hear God’s guidance when making any decision. By the end, readers’ eyes and ears will be opened to the limitless methods through which God speaks.

The 224-page resource is distributed in the U.S. by Kregel and independent distributors such as Anchor, and in Canada by David C. Cook; and is available to purchase wherever you buy quality Christian products. In the spirit of the book, maybe God’s using this blog post to suggest you get a copy!!


I also encourage you to check out the author’s website BeliefsOfTheHeart.com


Related:

My review of the author’s Is Sunday School Destroying Our Kids?

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June 28, 2016

Review: Hearing God in Conversation

God has many means at his disposal to get our attention

Hearing God in ConversationOver a year ago I was privileged to read a manuscript edition and asked to do an endorsement for a book which is now releasing from Kregel Publishing. Hearing God in Conversation: How to Recognize His Voice Everywhere is the second book by Sam Williamson, following Is Sunday School Destroying Our Kids which we reviewed here.

I would expect that a year is forever when you’re an author awaiting national release, so I was surprised this week with the good news that the book is now ready. Here’s the summary I wrote:

In Hearing God In Conversation: How to Walk with God, Samuel Williamson affirms the church’s long-held position that God’s primary means of speaking to us is through scripture; while at the same time, through a blend of Bible teaching, contemporary and classic Christian authors, and personal experience, shows us that God is in no way limited in terms of what he can use to prompt us, nudge us and lead us. Written in a casual, sometimes lighthearted style, Hearing God in Conversation propels us to a place of expectancy with respect to God’s voice; to look for God’s personal message to us in a variety of circumstances; and to be aware that God has a vast catalog of means he uses to guide his children.

Sometimes you forget about books you reviewed, but just seeing my own abstract of it, so much came flooding back. I really enjoyed it and benefited personally from reading it at the time.

Here’s the official publisher marketing for the book:

Christians are comfortable saying that Christianity is about a relationship with God. Yet many might also say that they sense little meaningful relationship with God in their own lives. After all, the foundation of good relationship is communication–but conversation with God often seems to go only one way. We may sing of walking and talking with God in the garden, His voice falling on our ears, but few have heard that beloved voice themselves.

Sam Williamson acknowledges the fundamental human longing to hear God’s voice and offers a hopeful supposition: God is always speaking–we’ve just never been taught how to recognize His voice. Williamson handles this potentially heady topic with his characteristic straightforwardness and leavening humor. This book deftly bridges the gap between solid biblical theology and practical application, addressing topics such as how to truly pray without ceasing, how to brainstorm with God, how to navigate our emotions, how to answer God’s questions, and how to hear God’s voice for others.

Hearing God in Conversation offers simple, step-by-step lessons on how to hear God. Williamson begins with Scripture meditation. He then expands the practice of listening for that voice everywhere–in the checkout line, on the job, in a movie theater, and even in silence. From there, he demonstrates how to hear God’s guidance when making any decision. By the end, readers’ eyes and ears will be opened to the limitless methods through which God speaks.

The 224-page resource is distributed in the U.S. by Kregel and independent distributors such as Anchor, and in Canada by David C. Cook; and is available to wherever you buy quality Christian products. In the spirit of the book, maybe God’s using this blog post to suggest you get a copy!!


I also encourage you to check out the author’s website BeliefsOfTheHeart.com

December 22, 2014

And So It Goes

Last week this appeared on the Dallas Willard quotes Twitter feed:

We must be open to the possibility of God’s addressing us in whatever way he chooses, or else we may walk right past a burning bush.

So of course, a certain element couldn’t leave that alone and posted a reply:

Or we could stick to Scripture and be CERTAIN that He’s spoken!

And then someone blogged a link to it, writing:

Um, okay, but what if it isn’t really God? Wouldn’t we be better off just reading the Bible?

And so it goes, day after day after day after day.

God must let out a sigh each time he sees this.

Here’s my take. If you do in fact read the Bible, then you know very well that God speaks to us in different ways, through the Bible, through the general revelation and the common grace, through other people, and by the Holy Spirit.

My point here isn’t that there are a variety of methods God uses, or how many there are, or how they work. My point is the phrase “then you know very well.”

Dallas is saying in effect, don’t miss out on something God may be using to show you something or teach you something. He has infinite means at his disposal.

And deep down in our hearts we all know that to be the case.

But there are people of a certain stripe within the realm of Christianity who simply can’t wait for an opportunity to dismiss Dallas Willard’s brand of faith, and demonstrate their spiritual superiority by waving the sola scriptura flag. It’s not so much that they violently disagree with the idea that God is at work in the world around us in so many different ways, as much as it’s an attempt to exploit Dallas’ words so they can make their point, thus advancing the cause of the Bible and truth and pure doctrine.

The problem is, these people have God so completely figured out that in carrying out their version of Christian living they can sometimes miss out on what God is doing in the world around them; miss out on hearing God’s voice.

Didn’t somebody say that already?

October 16, 2013

Perry Noble’s Eight Questions for Pastors

Filed under: Church — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:47 am

Perry Noble posted this in January, 2009 as a series of four blog posts. I thought he made some great points that should be preserved somewhere as a continuous text, so I created this as a ‘page’ here, but now that we’re doing some blog maintenance, it needs to be moved. Rather than simply bury it under an old date, I thought I would allow it run again as a fresh piece. I do realize Perry is quite controversial in some circles, but I still felt this article had merit.

Eight Questions I Believe Pastors Should Wrestle With

by Perry Noble

The further along I get into this pastor gig…the less answers I have & the more questions that I ask. Recently I made a list of eight questions I feel like I always need to keep in front of me…its helping me and I pray it may do the same for others.

#1 – “What if this Sunday was the last sermon I ever got to preach?”

Dear pastor, STOP…and read that again. Think about it…wrestle with it, seriously, allow that question to consume you for the rest of the day.

If THIS SUNDAY were the last time the Lord allowed you to preach…what would you say? How would you say it? What fear would you let go of? (Hmm…maybe someone needs to scrap the sermon they had originally planned for this Sunday & just go for it!)

Two weeks ago I made the decision that I am going to preach every sermon like it is my last…because…reality is I don’t know when my last sermon is going to be…and I don’t want to EVER leave the platform full of regret.

My prayer every Sunday is that God will absolutely set me on fire…and that I will speak clearly and full of conviction. Galatians 1:10 is very real to me…and I want to honor Jesus by saying everything I feel like He’s put in me to say.

Pastor…if Jesus puts it in you…you’ve got to speak it…otherwise you are “burying your talent,” and all of us know how that story ends!

One more thing…the goal of a message like this should be to lead the sheep…not beat them. Just something to keep in mind.


#2 – Am I waiting on God to do something for me that He has clearly asked me to do?

Let me be very clear…the term “waiting on God” really ticks me off because…well…it basically says, “I am so fast that I outran God…and now I am waiting on the Almighty to catch me!”

Uh…that has NEVER happened!

We don’t wait on God…He waits on us! (By the way…He’s outside of time…He doesn’t have to wait!)

So many pastors use the term “waiting on God” in order to remain passive in their leadership decisions. It may work with others…but not so much with Him!

I was reading the book of Joshua the other morning when God told Joshua, “Hey man, the land is yours…but I am not going to ‘do it all’ for you…you’ve got to TAKE IT!” Joshua was NOT waiting on God…but rather had to get to a place where He could embrace all that God has planned for him before he was even born.
Pastors…leadership requires that we take action, not be passive and hope that by some miracle that God will handle the situation that He has given us clear direction on.

God told Joshua to go in and take the land…and went ahead of him as he moved in obedience to God’s direction…and He expects the same from us as well.
When we “wait” on things to happen…we play defense…and God has called us to play offense.


#3 – Am I willing to make uncomfortable decisions?

One of the things I have discovered in leadership is that LOTS of people can identify the problem, talk about it, discuss it, pray about it…HOWEVER, there are VERY FEW PEOPLE who are usually willing to actually DO SOMETHING about the problem…

…BECAUSE…stepping up and being the leader OFTEN means we are willing to embrace the fact that God is going to require us to embrace uncomfortable situations.

This question really stood out to me the other day when I read Joshua 5:1-3. Let me ask you a question…do you REALLY think the guys were excited when Joshua dropped this bit of information on them? Do you think THIS was the picture of leadership Joshua had always dreamed of?

NOPE…but, Joshua clearly heard from God, was willing to be unpopular…and God honored his obedience.

One of the WORSE things we could ever embrace is a passion for being comfortable in leadership. Leaders make tough calls…period.


#4 – Am I pursuing God’s heart?

One of the things I’ve been asking of God lately is that He would allow the things that bother Him to bother me.

WARNING…do NOT pray that unless you are SERIOUS. He’s messing me up right now…and revealing Himself to me in ways that are absolutely blowing my mind.

I cannot be a good leader of others unless I am a passionte follower of Jesus…and to REALLY pursue Him means that I am begging Him for HIS agenda rather than trying to convince Him to buy into mine.

NewSpring is HIS church…not mine. I am a steward, NOT an owner. The church is HIS Bride…not mine. And the things that keep me up at night with worry…if I will just make it my passion to seek Him I will begin to understand that HE’S GOT IT ALL FIGURED OUT…HE’S NEVER WORRIED ABOUT NEWSPRING, so neither should I!

This peace ONLY comes as a result of seeking His heart.


#5 – Am I trying to do this alone?

One of the things I’ve tried to do quite unsuccessfully in the past is solo ministry…thinking that I really didn’t need the help of God or others.

STOP…no pastor would admit they would try to do ministry without God…but here’s a question…how much personal time do you spend in the word…sermon prep NOT included.

In order for me to lead publically I need to have a passion to meet with Him privately as often as I can.

AND…pastors, we need the help of others! We will never be able to do EVERYTHING in our church well…and we should stop trying. God uniquely designed you for a purpose…and when we embrace trying to do everything we often wind up accomplishing nothing.

I used to HATE asking people to do things because I falsly assumed that because I hated doing something that others would hate doing it as well…until I heard Andy Stanley talk about how there are people who actually LOVE to do the tasks that I can’t stand. (Organizing, etc.)

Pastors…there are people all around you just waiting on you to ask them to do what you hate to do. They know you are horrible at it…they’re praying that you will stop!!! SO…ask for God’s help…and embrace Ephesians 4:11-12 and get others involved as well.


#6 – Do I care more about my sermon for this Sunday…or the people who will hear it?

This one FLOORED me because…there have been times that I crafted the “perfect sermon” and completely forgot about the people who were going to hear it.

Pastors…we are called to honor God by giving Him our best. (II Timothy 2:15) And we should desire to preach great sermons…but our passion should be for the people that hear them to be transformed by the Gospel…and for their lives to be radically different.

People MATTER to God…the sermon MATTERS to God, but it should NEVER be our goal to hear “great sermon pastor” at the expense of us forgetting to love and lead the very people whom God tells us we will be held accountable for.

BOTH MUST MATTER…one does not have to be sacrificed for the other…just something the Lord is teaching me.


#7 – Am I being faithful or looking for a formula?

REALLY need to spend some time here! In the fall of 2002 our church grew from 504 to 1,600 in a period of six weeks. In 2006 our church went from averaging 4,000 a weekend in the spring to averaging around 8,000 a weekend in the fall.

When I tell pastors and church leaders that they all ask the same question, “What did you do?” (After all, God probably had NOTHING to do with it, right?)

SO MANY pastors out there want a formula to make their church grow…and so they hop from conference to conference trying to figure out what might work rather than BEGGING God for a white hot vision that will change the community that they are in.
Here’s the deal…we didn’t “do” anything during those amazing times of growth. (We did move into a new facility in 2006…but still didn’t expect that type of growth!!!) We didn’t launch a new program. We didn’t really change anything…we just simply kept doing the vision God gave us week in and week out…and He blew us away as a result.

My job as a pastor is NOT to find the latest, greatest church growth methods…but rather to be completely faithful and obedient to the vision God has poured inside of me.

One more thing…yes, we SHOULD go to conferences…we should learn as much as we can from others…however, our leadership should be DOMINATED by REVELATION from God rather than INSPIRATION from others.


#8 – Am I trying to be the Messiah in my church…or lead them to the REAL ONE? Pastors…STOP trying to be perfect.

Our goal should be to make much of Jesus…and that means embracing John 3:30 and, at times, being honest with our people about our trials and struggles.

People can identify way more with our mistakes than they can our successes. AND they don’t need US to be the Messiah…but rather to LEAD them to Jesus.

Paul was honest with his struggle in Romans 7:15-20…we should always be willing to be honest as well.

My church doesn’t need me to be their hero…they need to know about Christ and how, without Him, I would be completely screwed when it comes to life and eternity.

One more thing…I am NOT saying to confess your sins every Sunday to your church…what I am saying is don’t be afraid to tell them about the time you were insensitive to your wife, you got angry when someone cut you off in traffic, the seasons with which you struggled with porn…

Leading with integrity is embracing honesty! We should always use our weaknesses to point others to Christ’s strength.

One more thing…when you do talk about your struggles you will have people criticize you. Just remember that when that happens people usually find delight in finding fault in others so they don’t have to deal with their own mess. They want you to be perfect…but they are not perfect…which makes them a hypocrite. Love them through it and always be honest!


Perry Noble
Senior Pastor, NewSpring Church, Anderson SC


January 5, 2012

God Told Me To Write This. Or Did He?

The above graphic from CNN Belief really says it all, though it may be a little premature to count Perry as officially out just yet. 

There’s a tendency among Evangelicals to over-use, “Thus saith the Lord;” when the really mean, “Thus saith me;” unless of course, in their view, ‘the Lord’ = ‘me.’  There’s an equal tendency to over-use “God told me;” when in fact it merely seemed like a good idea at that time. 

Or maybe it was a desire of the heart.  There is a (conditional) promise that God will give us the desires of our heart, but it would appear that those desires begin within us. To claim external direction to run for President would make sense if it were a heavenly vision given to a man installing mufflers or a woman asking people, “Would you like fries with that?” But for many of these politicians, the aspiration to run for the (U.S.) nation’s top office has been part of a longer, lifelong process. Eventually, after all is said and done, there will only be one nominee.

Someone will want to argue that there are God-given desires; that there is no audible voice, but a want-to that is divinely implanted.  I might concede that one. In that case though, whether speaking to secularists or other believers, I would still avoid the use of ‘God told…”

You can click to join the conversation at CNN Belief. The forum needs people who will focus on the theological implications and not get hung up on the political.

September 5, 2011

A Lesson in Humility

There are times we can be so convinced that God is leading us to do something, that even afterward, when the particular vision or project doesn’t meet expectations, it’s hard to believe that, in terms of its original goals, the project was a bit of a failure.

Many years back, I would wake up in the morning, have breakfast and brush my teeth, and somewhere between the cereal bowl and the restroom sink my brain would flash this:  “$100,000.”  I tried to interpret this in different ways.  Was it a reference to Canada’s daily Christian television show, 100 Huntley Street? No, I decided that what it meant was that I was to raise $100K for Camp Iawah.

Iawah — pronounced the same as Iowa — is an acronym for In All Ways Acknowledge Him. It’s the camp my wife and I met at, and the camp where our two boys served on staff this summer. I guess I was hoping that in the process of raising some money for them, I would be welcomed more warmly when I arrived on the property. The camp — though already a second home — would become my “Cheers” bar, where everybody knows my name and they’re always glad I came. Plus, like most parachurch ministries, they could really use the money for capital projects. Secretly, I hoped my efforts would raise $200K.

My strategy was to advertise in Canada’s national Christian magazine, Faith Today, a publication of the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada. To draw in interest on a national scale, I would focus on the ‘mission field’ aspect of eastern Ontario, the part of the province designated by the “K” postal code.

It’s important to note that this area stands in contrast to the relative ‘Bible belt’ of western Ontario. “K” at the time didn’t have more than 100 churches where there would be more than 100 adults present on a Sunday morning. Most of these were in major cities like Ottawa, Kingston, Peterborough, Belleville, etc. and “K” wasn’t the home of any major Christian organizations or Bible colleges.

“Name a mission field that starts with the letter ‘K'” was the tagline for the advertisements.

Yes, several ads. One for Camp Iawah. One for Northumberland Christian School, a ‘diamond in the rough’ where I had taught part-time for a year, which really needed a financial kick-start; and one for CHRI radio in Ottawa, Canada’s first-licensed commercial Christian radio station. The series of three advertisements would be a win-win-win. The magazine would be an immediate winner with some advertising revenue. My three (at the time) bookstores, also all located within the “K” code, would get fine-print mention at the bottom of the page, also ensuring a business write-off. And of course the organizations in question would be placed on the hearts of readers across the country who would respond with donations.

The first advertisement hit a bulls eye of sorts. The magazine was already running a cover story on Christian camping, and within a week, I was emailed that a family had signed up their kids for that summer. But after a couple of months, I was told, “If any donations we’ve received are a direct result of the advertisement, we aren’t aware of it.”

That was disappointing, but by then the next advertisement was already running. These were 1/3rd page display ads, and I was reminded that, “The effectiveness of any advertising campaign increases after several repetitions.” And due to a technical error, that second one got run twice. But six months in, money was neither pouring into the camp nor the school, and my attempt at raising awareness of ministry need in “K”-land was clearly flawed. I ran the third one anyway for CHRI Radio in Ottawa. After the eight month campaign, I wondered if just giving the money directly to the organizations in questions might not have been a better use of funds.

These were good advertisements, persuasive, informative and well written. So what went wrong? Here are some thoughts, you might have more to add:

  1. The first one, for the camp, was done with mixed motivation. I wanted greater acceptance there, so I sought to earn it somehow.
  2. I acted as a lone ranger, “gifting” my promotional and writing abilities to the organizations, but not working with those people to optimize the opportunity.
  3. I overestimated those same abilities, forgetting that I was, after all, a person who once held a yard sale to which absolutely no one came. A bit of a record, wouldn’t you say?
  4. I possibly needed a lesson in humility.
  5. I got confused by thought patterns like the “$100,000” thing that got stuck in my head, forgetting there are people who, every time they drive by a certain tree or stop sign on the way to work have a song that triggers in their brain for no apparently connected reason.

Since then, I’ve also learned the line, “The voices in your head may be due to the pizza you ate last night.”  But there are also some things that came out of this I need to remind myself:

  1. I did provide some needed revenue to the magazine.
  2. There was the family that signed up for camp, and apparently one that learned of the school.
  3. I will never know if some donations were sent as a direct result of the campaign but just not connected by the donors or the recipients. Or perhaps the ads served as a reminder to people who were already on the mailing list of those organizations.
  4. Despite a lack of tangible results, I did raise awareness of the needs in the “K” postal code, an area that continues to struggle.
  5. I was obedient to the vision I thought I had received with no negative complications or side-effects for pursuing that vision.

Fall is a time in ministry to dream dreams. You need to know with clarity that those dreams are God-sent, but that won’t always present itself with 100% assurance; some of it has to be a step of faith. You need to be willing to risk failure. You need to be willing to do the necessary analysis afterward to see if there’s anything you can learn. I believe that doing something is better than doing nothing.

[] [] []

Camp Iawah is growing and meeting spiritual needs in the lives of hundreds each year. If someone were wanting to invest in the lives of the next generation, this ministry organization would be at the top of my recommended list.  CHRI Radio has moved from being a commercial music station to the financially-safer format of selling blocks of air-time to radio ministries, but still requires donations to meet its budget. I believe that the Christian school still faces some long-term challenges, though its larger family of schools is worthy of support. 

And yes: The magazine Faith Today continues to be published by the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, our equivalent of — but not connected with — the National Association of Evangelicals in the U.S.

August 24, 2011

Wednesday Link List

I like a church that covers all the basics for living

Years from now, when anthropologists discover this blog, they will say, “Truly, this was the Wednesday Link List for August 24th, 2011.”

  • Randy Alcorn quotes a Chuck Colson report that we shouldn’t be talked into thinking there’s been a lessening of persecution of Christians in China.
  • The author and publishers of The Shack — a bestselling Christian novel — found themselves on opposite sides of a lawsuit which was finally settled out of court.
  • Just what WOULD the Beatles have come up with, creatively speaking, had they been followers of Jesus all those years ago? A good friend of ours has finally given us the green light to release the link for a take-off to The Beatles “When I’m Sixty-Four.”  So enjoy “Matthew Six Three-Four.”  (The link will open your computer’s media player.) Stay tuned for more from Martin Barret on a soon to be released project featuring this song and others.
  • Schullergate Item of the Week:  The Crystal Cathedral succeeded in getting a dissenting website, Crystal Cathedral Music, taken down this week. The site featured commentary from former members of the CC choir and orchestra and friends of the Cathedral’s former music style.
  • Darryl Dash warns pastors and others that when it comes to email and online correspondence, nothing is confidential.
  • Christianity Today profiles Dave Ramsey, noting the new Momentum curriculum, designed to bring the same advice to cash-strapped churches as is given individuals.
  • Alex Mejias at the blog High Street Hymns gives you Five Reasons to Use Liturgical Music in Your Contemporary Worship Service.  (And no, “Liturgical songs are free of copyright worries” wasn’t in the list.)  [HT: Zac Hicks.]
  • This one’s a repeat from April, but I read it again and laughed again.  What if churches used their signs to suggest “purpose statements” that were actually achievable?
  • DotSub — the online service which adds subtitles in any language to your videos — picks up a June, 2010 TED Talk by Larry Lessig which deals with copyright and fair use, but begins with an observation about Republicans: They go to church.
  • Ronnie McBrayer adds his voice to The Underground, a Christian website like no other, and notes that a lot of people do strange things because they thought they heard God’s voice.
  • In an in-depth article, CNN ponders whether Christians can win the war against pornography. (Over 3,000 comments as of Monday.)
  • Julie Clawson considers the theological implications of the Veggie Tales song, “The Pirates Who Don’t Do Anything.”  Okay, that’s not exactly what this post is all about.
  • Just discovering the music of Phil Wickham.  Gave Mrs. W. the Cannons album last week for being good!  This older song, You’re Beautiful, is closing in on 2,000,000 YouTube views.  For the already-converted (!) here’s a clip from Phil’s October-releasing album, Response.
  • Darrell at Stuff Fundies Like delivers a fundy take on I Cor. 13; though in all honesty, I gotta say this one is high in contention for being tomorrow’s post here.
  • You’re not really going to the bathroom at Bible study group are you?  Bryan Lopez reblogged Tech-Crunch’s Technology is the New Smoking.
  • Somewhat related: Chrystal at Life After Church introduces a new blog series by describing a very non-Baptist way to engage with scripture.
  • Thomas Prosser at the UK Guardian newspaper thinks that Christian youth camps are manipulative, but before you read, you need to know that what they term as camps, we refer to as festivals.
  • If you’re a link-o-phile, you’ll also find a daily rundown at Take Your Vitamin Z (Zach Nielsen), Kingdom People (Trevin Wax) and Tim Challies.  These bloggers include things from the broader blogosphere including lots of tech news, but when it comes to theological discussion the links are all from a single doctrinal family of bloggers.  (Note the vast number of links that turn up on all three over the course of a month.)  The mix here is quite different, but feel free to check out the three mentioned above as well as the large, diverse number of other bloggers in the margin at right.  These links are constantly checked for (a) a spiritual focus, (b) frequent and recent posting, and (c) taken as a group, doctrinal mix and balance.

The Wednesday List Lynx arrives late to the party

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