Thinking Out Loud

January 17, 2016

Our Need for Affirmation

img 011716 TYA few weeks ago a guy came up to me after church and told me how much he was thankful for the leadership of my wife and I while I was on staff at that church for four years more than 20 years ago. It’s nice to know our contribution was appreciated and remembered after all that time, especially when the population of that church has changed so much over the years.

We all like a thank you every now and then. It reminded me of the story of the ten lepers. Most of you know this, but for those who don’t you can take 60 seconds to read it in Luke 17:11-19.

We tend to think of this as a story of Christ’s strength and power.

First of all, we see Jesus in his divinity. He cures the ten lepers with just a command; he speaks the word and they are healed, not necessarily instantaneously, but as they take the steps of traveling to show themselves to the priest. But it happens at his word.

Not only that, but when the one leper returns to give thanks, he turns it into a teachable moment.

But I wonder if, second of all, we also see Jesus in his humanity? While he didn’t need the lepers to head off to Hallmark after and buy a package of ten assorted thank-you notes, I wonder if it warmed his heart to be thanked for what he had done?

Leper #4: Here we go, boxed Thank-You cards.
Leper #3: We can’t all send the same card.
Leper #7: What if we all sign one card.
Leper #2: That’s cheesy.
Leper #8: Look this package has an assortment.
Leper #5: Ask if they take MasterCard.

And when you think about it, isn’t that verbalization of thanks, that opening of the lines of communication — don’t miss the similarity between that word and the word communion — not also a characteristic of his divinity? (Yes, I know, it tends to come full circle.)

Apply this →→ Is there someone who was instrumental in your life in past years who would appreciate a thank-you? Can you track them down on Facebook, or Twitter? Your words might minister to them today as their life did to you all those years ago…

…and also, do you owe the Lord a thank-you for something you haven’t actually expressed to him?

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December 16, 2011

Overheard Conversation

A conversation between two people in a retirement home:

Person One: I pray to Jesus all day long.

Person Two: Pray to him? I don’t even think about him.

The reason for quoting this is that Person Two is an elder in a local church. A rather strange thing for a person to admit who has been given a leadership position in a Christian organization, right?

Or is it more common than we think?  I know I don’t always make right choices in the course of a day, and I also know there are times I am just rushed off my feet. But there is a constant awareness that Jesus is always nearby; that the Holy Spirit is present even if I am not consciously aware of it, or even if I am screaming inside for guidance and direction; that God is watching, and not, as the song says, “from a distance.”

Person Two’s statement is also a very candid admission that their faith is not an active reality or active force in their life. It’s somewhat dismissive and perhaps even defiant (“Jesus who? I don’t give him a thought…”). It means the faith system that forms the central core of their church’s beliefs, and the Person who both embodies and teaches those beliefs just doesn’t impact their thoughts at all during an average day. Rather shameful for a ‘spiritual’ person identified as a leader in a ‘spiritual’ institution or ‘religious’ organization.

I might as well go to work and forget that I’m married from the minute I close the front door. (“My wife? I don’t even think about her.”) I might come home at the end of the day because there is a meal waiting and a bed to sleep in, but otherwise I’m not giving her a single thought in the intervening hours. That’s just nuts.

Scripture tells us to “be in conversation with God without ceasing.” That’s my paraphrase. It means the lines are open. The link has been clicked from my waking moments and the page is open. The call is on speaker-phone. The intercom has been pressed. The instant-messaging has been activated.

And Person One, by the way, is very concerned that Person Two could spend a whole life “in church” and miss out on the central reality of a living relationship with the Creator and Sustainer of the world; missing out on the central reality that eternal life can begin right here, right now, today.

So, how often do you think about Jesus?

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