Thinking Out Loud

August 20, 2019

In the Future, Amazon Will Control Much of What Christian Publishers Release

This article appeared today on one of our sister blogs, Christian Book Shop Talk, written for Christian bookstore owners, managers and sales associates.

An article released Friday by Canada’s Tim Challies on the influence that Amazon now has on the Christian publishing market has been making the rounds, and I wanted to wait a few days before responding. You can find The Power Over Christian Publishing We’ve Given To Amazon by clicking this link.

He begins dramatically,

A few days from now, or maybe a few months, or even a year, Amazon will pull a book from its site. One day it will be there available for purchase with all the rest, and the next it will be gone. One day people will be able to order it and have it shipped to their homes, and the next day it will have ceased to exist, at least as far as Amazon is concerned. This will inevitably be a book that Christians have embraced as orthodox but that the culture has rejected as heretical…

We’ve seen some of this happen already (especially with respect to Amazon pulling titles) so it isn’t prophetic. He then sets the stage defining the challenge for the future:

…[W]e inadvertently handed Amazon a near-monopoly over the sale of Christian books. We did this with the good-faith assumption that they would continue to sell whatever we published. But times have changed and are changing and it seems increasingly unlikely that Amazon will continue to sell it all. It seems increasingly likely that they will cede to cultural pressure—pressure that exists both within and outside of the company—and begin to cull their offerings. And then what? It’s not like these books cannot be sold by the Christian retailers that remain. But will publishers even be willing or able to publish them if they cannot be sold at the world’s biggest marketplace? Will you and I even be able to find out about them if Amazon isn’t recommending them to us? And will we be willing to pay a premium to have them shipped to us from smaller retailers with higher prices and no ability to offer free shipping?…

In a way, this is nothing new. Spin the search engine wheel and you’ll find many articles from the past accusing Christian publishers of only selling things that will do well at Family Christian Stores or LifeWay, and being extra cautious with progressive writers. But now FCS is gone, and LifeWay is phasing out its physical presence in America’s cities and towns.

Why should a publisher print something which retail won’t carry? Historically, that’s been a challenge, but now that in many parts of North America there is no retail (in the traditional sense) indie-published books compete with those from the larger, established publishing houses. The online behemoth is in many respects now calling the shots. Brick and mortar retail stores don’t matter as they once did; we’ve lost our influence.

What is new is the people to whom that power has been ceded. While dealing with a different aspect of this, Tim Challies correctly notes that,

Amazon is hardly a company founded by Christians or run according to Christian principles. To the contrary, it is a company founded by worldly people and run according to worldly principles.

And beyond the social issues Tim mentions, it bothers me that Amazon has no filters. A Jehovah’s Witness title, New Age title or an LDS title is just as likely to turn up in the search results as something from Baker, Zondervan or David C. Cook. Already, I’ve heard stories of people who unwittingly bought inappropriate books based on search engine results. This in and of itself highlights the value of Christian bookstore buyers and proprietors.

So what if those Christian publishers said to Amazon, “Since you now advertise as ‘the world’s largest bookstore,’ it would be nice if you would carry our titles exhaustively instead of selectively” or even dared to suggest that, “If you won’t carry everything, we won’t sell you anything at all.” If A-zon called their bluff on that, it would be devastating both to authors and consumers, since if a book’s A-zon listing doesn’t appear in search results, the book, for all intents and purposes, ceases to exist.

Again, to read the article at challies.com, click this link.

 

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July 4, 2019

Remembering Norman Geisler

Filed under: apologetics, books, Christianity — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:37 am

A leading voice in Christian apologetics, author Norman Geisler passed away on Monday at age 86.

Books by Geisler in Christian bookstores include: Who Made God?, Chosen But Free, I Don’t Have Enough Faith to be an Atheist, When Skeptics Ask, Essential Doctrine Made Easy, If God Why Evil, and more. He also contributed to many other books, such as Four Views on Eternal Security and a large number of Bible reference books.

Richard Land, Executive Editor of The Christian Post wrote:

…Dr. Geisler has been the “go to” authority for more than two generations of evangelical seminary students who were looking for a bold, erudite, and uncompromisingly faithful defense of the inerrant, infallible Word of God and the historical doctrines of the Christian faith. His ministry was invaluable, and his influence incalculable…

The funeral service will be on July 6th, Saturday at 3pm in Charlotte, North Carolina according to his Facebook page notice.

Read more at Religion News Service.

 

 

June 3, 2019

Again Remembering Rachel Held Evans

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 10:36 am

Nadia Bolz-Weber delivers the sermon at the funeral for Rachel Held Evans on June 1. YouTube screenshot via Religion News Service.

Abraham doubted. Job doubted. Peter doubted. Martha doubted. Even Jesus cried out, “My God, why have you forsaken me?” Condemning people who are thoughtful about their faith, who doubt & who wrestle & who cry out with questions, is legalism from the pit of hell.

Oh there are times I really miss living with absolute certainty, never questioning anything I believed or anything my pastor said, or any of my interpretations or biases or ideas. It was easier then. But maybe God doesn’t want easy.
– Rachel Held Evans, January, 2018

Yesterday I either watched or listened to all of the 1¾ hour video on YouTube of the funeral for Rachel Held Evans, as it had been streamed live the day before. I know I’ve already covered this topic when Rachel’s death was announced, but I can’t help returning.

I won’t embed those here as we did last time, but just note some highlights. If you want to find the original for unlinked quotations, try my Twitter feed. I unashamedly retweeted about ten of them.

Friend Jeff Chu wrote,

…The family asked for a funeral, not a celebration of life. Though ecumenical, the liturgy is based on the Episcopal one to honor Rachel’s adopted tradition. We gather to mourn and grieve, to look toward resurrection hope, and to worship. 

Religion News Service confirmed, “The service was ecumenical but drew from the Episcopal Church’s funeral liturgy, Held Evans’ adopted church.”

A podcast host I’m not familiar with, Amy Sullivan, wrote:

This is like our version of the Billy Graham funeral except that Rachel was 50 years younger and it is, in Rachel’s words, “a bunch of outcasts and oddballs gathered at [God’s] table.”

I’m still pondering the comparison — not the Billy to Rachel comparison, but rather the funeral to funeral comparison — because both impacted different cultures, but both for the cause of the same Lord. Two very significant moments for two unique demographics; two subsets of Christian culture.

Writer Jonathan Martin said,

I don’t really have words for how holy this was. The atmosphere was dense with God—the weight of grace and grief, of Spirit crackling through the room between us.

Author Sarah Bessey, who participated in the liturgy, wrote,

It was a testimony to Rachel’s life to stand in a crowded (packed!) room and know this rowdy, deep, diverse, never-would-have-found-each-other-without-her community all showed up in Chattanooga, just so we could say goodbye together and to love her family. 

Rachel’s sister Amanda, who gave a Eulogy and performed a song — one that she had written for Rachel but never sung for her — tweeted:

How will I remember her? And what will I remember most? Hopefully, the wide-eyed wonder of our childhood. And the long history of love that only sisters share. I don’t have to remember …because she is a part of me. 

I hope that song can be posted at some point in the future with a proper recording. The audio for the live stream was very poor any time there was anything involving music.

Husband Dan posted on her blog:

…I want to be just a bit more like the person I see reflected back in my edited self. The person Rachel saw in me. She made me better than I was before I met her. She left the world better than how she found it. For that I will always be grateful.

Singer Audrey Assad also participated,

I have a crying hangover from [remembering Rachel] at her funeral today. And I’m filled with absolute gratitude that I got to come and say goodbye.

Shane Claiborne wrote,

After saying goodbye to [Rachel] today, mom & I watched the sunset for her birthday. I told her the best present I can imagine giving her is a set of Rachel’s books. (My mom is new to RHE). As sure as the sun will rise again, Rachel lives.

The anon Twitter account, Unvirtuous Abbey posted,

Watching people you’ve followed for years on twitter as they grieve a sister and testify to her life was a surreal yet powerful reminder that community is real. Seeing her family in the front pew was heartbreaking. 

Jeff Chu’s prayer include this:

God who is ridiculous, inexplicable love: Help us to know, feel, and embody that love, radiating it out into a nation and a world that desperately need it. As Rachel had posted over her desk, our job is to tell the truth—and the truth is that this world isn’t the just, kind, righteous place of flourishing for all people, all creatures, that you would have it be. We pray against all forms of hate, disdain, and neglect, and we pray for all who have unfairly suffered its consequences—for women, for refugees and immigrants, for people of color, for LGBTQ people, for disabled people, for poor people, for the unseen, for the unheard. Inspire us to be women of valor, men of valor, people of valor—living out our faith, cultivating hope, and shining love on all around us, as Rachel did.

Although I’ve had some recent reasons for concern regarding the ministry of Nadia Bolz-Weber, her sermons are always right on the mark and her delivering the funeral sermon — something not announced prior — was no exception. Several have asked her to post the text. 

Carina Julig at Word and Way reported that Sarah Bessey and Nadia Bolz-Weber “displayed the tattoos they got in advance of the service. Those tattoos read, ‘eshet chayil,’ or ‘woman of valor’ in Hebrew, a phrase from the Bible that Held Evans popularized.”

Yesterday, instead of our regular devotional post at Christianity 201, I included some assorted elements from the liturgy. You can find those here. For a link to the full text of the Requiem Eucharist or a link to the full video, click here. But I do want to include the Benediction here. The final paragraph is Rachel’s own words:

Blessed are the agnostics. Blessed are they who doubt. Blessed are those who have nothing to offer. Blessed are the preschoolers who cut in line at communion. Blessed are the poor in spirit. You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

Blessed are those whom no one else notices. The kids who sit alone at middle-school lunch tables. The laundry guys at the hospital. The sex workers and the night-shift street sweepers. The closeted. The teens who have to figure out ways to hide the new cuts on their arms. Blessed are the meek. You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

Blessed are they who have loved enough to know what loss feels like. Blessed are the mothers of the miscarried. Blessed are they who can’t fall apart because they have to keep it together for everyone else. Blessed are those who “still aren’t over it yet.” Blessed are those who mourn.You are of heaven and Jesus blesses you.

I imagine Jesus standing here blessing us because that is our Lord’s nature. This Jesus cried at his friend’s tomb, turned the other cheek, and forgave those who hung him on a cross. He was God’s Beatitude— God’s blessing to the weak in a world that admires only the strong.

Jesus invites us into a story bigger than ourselves and our imaginations, yet we all get to tell that story with the scandalous particularity of this moment and this place. We are storytelling creatures because we are fashioned in the image of a storytelling God. May we never neglect that gift. May we never lose our love for telling the story. Amen.

 

 

 

 

May 10, 2019

How to Accuse Someone of Heresy

Before you say:

  • He’s not a Christian
  • She doesn’t know the Lord
  • He’s probably in hell today

make sure you’ve worked your way through the normal method of drawing such conclusion.

Citation

You simply must quote the name of the work in question and page number. Include the quotation. If you can’t honestly bring yourself to purchase a copy of the author’s book, while I admire you for standing on your principles and not spending money on someone you don’t think you can support, know that you have forfeited the right to critique their writing. There is no need to read further.

Identify

Make clear what it is in the quotation that you feel is worthy of examination. Everyone else may be reading this and seeing “A” but if you feel “B” is present, note both the impact and implications of the authors words. State what you see the author saying. At this stage avoid citing third parties. This is about what you want to express concerning the author.

Verify (1)

Make sure you’re not ‘proof-texting’ the author. Don’t use pull-quotes to deliberately be provocative if the body of the larger paragraph doesn’t support your thesis. Is the author using sarcasm, humor, etc.? Jesus himself used hyperbole on several occasions in his teaching. (People who feel they have been called to defend the faith against heresy are, for reasons that escape me, generally lacking a sense of humor.) I know one particular author who is not known as a humorist, but did one title totally tongue-in-cheek. And certain people will always miss that sort of thing.

Verify (2)

Do the research for yourself. Don’t quote someone else. And make sure that person has followed these steps. (The propagation of the KJV-Only movement happened only because people built a foundation on ‘so-and-so says.’ In fact the whole thing can be traced back to two individuals, with very little primary research done by others.)

Compare

Now that you’ve followed those steps, compare what the author says verse-by-verse with scripture and make the case that there is definitely a conflict.

Avoid Generalization

Just because an author can be faulted on an individual point does not mean that their ministry has a whole deserves to be labelled heretical. (I would be greatly hurt if you called me a heretic just because I have views on eschatology that are different from yours. Which, by the way, I do.) For more on this, Google the phrase ‘logical fallacies.’ 

Civility 

Avoid name calling at all costs. Even if the person is a ___________________, it diminishes your argument. I would go so far to say it completely undermines your argument.

Repent

If the tide of public opinion on a particular author is positive and your view is negative, ask yourself why you are the lone prophet in the wilderness. Look for the fruit. If there’s fruit, and it’s good fruit, God is using them. “Who are you to judge someone else’s servant? To their own master, servants stand or fall. And they will stand, for the Lord is able to make them stand.” – Romans 14:4

Humility

I would want to avoid the actual charge, “Heresy!” Sufficient to say you have concerns. And don’t even begin to express opinions about the eternal destiny of someone based on what you’ve written. Even if every charge you make about doctrinal aberration is correct, you don’t know that.

May 6, 2019

Remembering Two Much-Loved But Diverse Authors

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:45 am

This past week Christian readers lost two very much loved authors, each successful by different metrics, but each unique, catering to two very different audiences: Rachel Held Evans and Warren Wiersbe. It speaks to the diversity or breadth of the Christian subculture that it includes such a broad range of writers; such a wide demographic.

Rachel Held Evans died on May 4th at age 37, after entering a coma following treatment for flu and a subsequent infection. The outpouring of love for Rachel on social media has been enormous. Her titles included Searching for Sunday , A Year of Biblical Womanhood, Faith Unraveled: How a Girl Who Knew All the Answers Learned to Ask (formerly Evolving in Monkey Town), and her newest Inspired: Slaying Giants, Walking on Water, and Loving the Bible Again. (Two published by Zondervan, two by Thomas Nelson.)

The first report of problems came on her blog on April 19th. “During treatment for an infection Rachel began exhibiting unexpected symptoms. Doctors found that her brain was experiencing constant seizures. She is currently in the ICU. She is in a medically induced coma while the doctors work to determine the cause and solution.”

Updates continued until May 4th,

Rachel was slowly weaned from the coma medication. Her seizures returned but at a reduced rate. There were periods of time where she didn’t have seizures at all. Rachel did not return to an alert state during this process. The hospital team worked to diagnose the primary cause of her seizures and proactively treated for some known possible causes for which diagnostics were not immediately available due to physical limitations.

Early Thursday morning, May 2, Rachel experienced sudden and extreme changes in her vitals. The team at the hospital discovered extensive swelling of her brain and took emergency action to stabilize her. The team worked until Friday afternoon to the best of their ability to save her. This swelling event caused severe damage and ultimately was not survivable.

She leaves her husband Dan, and two children. Dan told Slate’s Ruth Graham,

“She put others before herself… She shared her platform. She always remembered how others had helped her. She enjoyed seeing other people in contexts where they thrived. She didn’t hold grudges, would forget as well as forgive. She had little time for pettiness and a big heart for people. And these are all things I wish I had told her more while I still had the privilege to keep her company.”

News of her passing was carried at The New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, People Magazine, and a great swell of tributes on Twitter at the hashtag #BecauseofRHE.

Read more at Slate, Health Updates, Religion News Service, CBN News, and the GoFundMe page set up by fellow-author Sarah Bessey.

Warren Wiersbe died on May 2nd at age 89. Anyone who has read the series of commentaries known informally as “The Bees” — Be Victorious (Revelation), Be Joyful (Phllippians), Be Mature (James), Be Real (1 John), Be Dynamic (Acts), etc. — knows Warren Wiersbe. (David C. Cook) There’s about 50 titles; which are also available in a two-volume hardcover set. Many of “The Bees” are also available in a study guide form — Wiersbe Bible Study Guide Series — for groups. A Wikipedia article credits him with over 150 books in total. Showing a sense of humour, his autobiography is titled Be Myself.

He worked for Youth for Christ, and pastored at Central Baptist Church in East Chicago, Indiana (1951–1957), Calvary Baptist Church in Covington, Kentucky (1961–1971), and the iconic Moody Memorial Church in Chicago, Illinois (1971–1980). He was very much involved in mentoring pastors, including a young Erwin Lutzer. He was also a much sought-after conference speaker.

This prolific author will be greatly missed. Learn more at Christianity Today and Premier (UK).

January 22, 2019

Rooted in Reality, Released as Fiction: Book Took 23 Years to be Published

Filed under: books, Christianity — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:28 am

Last week, Michael Bell, one of the contributors at Internet Monk shared the story behind the just-released book In His Majesty’s Secret Service written by his younger brother, Patrick. First here’s what Michael wrote at iMonk:

A little over thirty years ago my younger brother, Patrick Bell, left on an adventure. He joined Greg, his best friend from high school, on a clandestine team smuggling bibles behind the Iron Curtain. For two years they crisscrossed Eastern Europe bringing Bibles, medicines, and food to Christians who faced persecution and even death because of their faith.

They took ten trips into Romania, where Christians were having a particularly difficult time under President Nicolae Ceaușescu. It was also very stressful for the smuggling teams. “When you hear gunfire outside your hotel and there are bullet holes in the window and blood on the carpet, you know you’re in the thick of things.” A network of informers meant that they could never be sure who they could trust.

In his downtime he started writing about what he was experiencing. He wrote in the genre of a historical fiction, with himself and Greg being portrayed as two of the main characters in the book.

His letters from their Austrian base kept us up-to-date on what he was doing. Some of his stories made it into the manuscript he was writing. Others for security reasons did not. He wrote to our family about some of the ethical issues that a Bible Smuggler faces: What do you do when asked at the border if you have Bibles? How do you hold church services when they have been banned? These very real dilemmas were addressed in his manuscript in the context of a story of high risk, betrayal, faith, prison escapes, near misses, revolution, death, and even a little romance. All was skilfully woven together in a way that put the manuscript into the “can’t put down” category.

In the late fall of 1989 we received a letter from Pat. “I’m not very hopeful for the situation in Romania”, he wrote, “there are soldiers with sub-machine guns on every corner.” Six weeks later, the revolution had been successful and Ceaușescu was arrested.. “When Ceaușescu was shown on TV, soldiers became so angry at him, they wanted to shoot the TV.” On Christmas day, 1989, Ceaușescu and his wife were led before a firing squad and executed. They had been tried before a secret tribunal and found guilty of multiple crimes against the country.

A few days later I was watching the CBS evening news. The Romanian border had just been opened with the West and CBS had a reporter on the spot interviewing the first visitors to make the trip across. I almost fell out of my chair when I saw my brother Pat, and Holly (his future wife), smiling at the cameras from inside their vehicle? “Why are you headed into Romania”, the reporter asked? “We heard there was great skiing in Romania!”, came the response. The Bibles were, as usual, still carefully concealed. I learned later that they were given a tank escort into Bucharest and he was offered a ride!

So what happened to the manuscript? In 1995, Pat and Holly moved to Japan to teach English in order to pay down school debts. The manuscript went into a box. For the twelve years they were in Japan, another year in Kenya, and nine more years in Canada, the manuscript sat in the box unseen. About a year ago Pat happened upon the box and opened it. There was the manuscript. The floppy disks on which it had been written were long gone. “We really should do something with this,” Holly said. With the help of a friend, Pat had the book scanned and converted back into readable text. Holly found a publishing contest to enter, and so Pat spent a few more weeks editing the book to get it ready to submit.

They won the contest!

At his website, Patrick writes: “…I’m a Canadian, now living in Kelowna, BC. I’m a graduate of Wheaton College (MA, Inter-cultural Studies, 1995) and Regent University (MBA, International Business, 2007)…” He adds that he “is an ambassador for Open Doors, Canada. If you want to help your persecuted brothers and sisters around the world, there are so many opportunities to get involved.”

At Word Alive, here’s a summary of the book:

Jim, Nick, and Kirsten have always had a heart for their fellow believers behind the Iron Curtain. It’s one thing to pray for their brothers and sisters in Romania, though, and another thing entirely to face hostile border guards with illegal Bibles hidden in their van. Only God can blind the eyes of those searching the vehicle so the three of them will be allowed to pass through safely.

Someone in the underground Romanian church is an informer, and the three Bible smugglers want to know who. The brutal dictatorship of Nicolae Ceaușescu, the watching eyes of the secret police, and a personal vendetta being carried out by a colonel with a forty-year grudge have put them and all the believers in danger. As rumours of revolution swirl around them, Jim, Nick, and Kirsten face an impossible dilemma. If they can’t trust those who call themselves Christians, who can they trust?

At Internet Monk there’s an excerpt from the book.

Finally, at Word Alive Press, you can read the official contest announcement with winners and runners-up.

U.S. customers can inform their local bookstore that the title may be ordered through Anchor Distributors.


ISBN: 9781486617548 | paperback | 224 pages | $19.99 US/CDN

January 11, 2019

When Should Christian Bookstores Pull Authors from Shelves and Online Listings?

Some of you know that when I’m not writing this blog and editing Christianity 201; when I’m not leading or assisting in weekend worship at a local church; when I’m not occasionally speaking at a church; during the rest of the time I am making decisions for our local Christian bookstore.

One of the hardest decisions I made in 2018 was to remove books by Bill Hybels from our shelves. It isn’t that those books don’t contain much truth and that many of them have been personally beneficial to me. It was just that — with shelf space at a premium in our small town store — we didn’t need the distraction.

I didn’t just make the decision, but personally removed the books, title by title, and put them in a box where they remain today. There were more than a dozen titles. Bill was a big influence on me and I have to say doing this really, really hurt, but as long as there were new ongoing developments in the story, I felt we needed to do this.

Christian bookstores have pulled product many times in the past. I got into this business through the Christian music industry first as a broadcaster and then as a performer and later as a vendor of records and cassettes. I once sat in a restaurant in Newport Beach, California and was interviewed for the job of assistant editor of Contemporary Christian Music magazine. My friends called me a ‘walking encyclopedia’ on CCM, and I given about seven seconds of audio, could name just about any song and artist, including that obscure cut at the end of side two.

When Amy Grant and Sandy Patti went through divorce, many stores pulled product. Oddly enough, those divorces are still in their past, but their music is back on the shelves. Divorce became more widely accepted among Evangelicals. I would argue that the whole LGBT thing in the church is where divorce was a couple of generations back. And I expect that, as in the case of Ray Boltz or Jennifer Knapp, stores still actively pull product when an artist comes out.

Why all this today? Because I’m staring at the shelves under “M” for James MacDonald. Christian radio stations are rapidly dropping his program (see Wednesday’s column) and James is trying to control the situation by announcing the shutdown of Walk in the Word’s broadcast division. There are calls for him to resign. Unlike those who were divorced, or Hybels’ flirtatiousness, the issue with MacDonald seems to be money and the control of money. It’s definitely his Achilles Heel.

Once again, those books contain much truth. James MacDonald is a great communicator and his writing includes a constant, unabashed call to repentance. He has served many people well in that area of his life. But at this point, I wonder if those books are also going to prove to be a distraction.

This isn’t about judgment. It’s about a shortage of shelf space, and a host of new, upcoming, younger authors who deserve to be heard. Some of those will prove themselves as the leading Christian voices to their generation. The cream rises to the top. By their fruit they will be known. Some will disappear off the scene within five years. Again, it’s not about judgment.

It’s also too easy for stores just to keep ordering key names; somewhat akin to living in a county — as I do — where every time there’s an election, people simply vote for the incumbents. So Max Lucado, Tim Keller, Mark Batterson, Lee Strobel, Stormie Omartian, John Bevere, Joyce Meyer, Neil Anderson, etc.; are always assured their latest title will get picked up at the local store level.

And honestly, if the sales reps came around with new titles by Hybels and MacDonald there are store owners who simply aren’t investing time keeping up online and would simply order those titles unwittingly.

The best analogy I ever heard was when a local pastor called my wife and I “gatekeepers.” I never thought of our role that way, but it’s a responsibility that needs to be taken very seriously. Conversely, pastors need to guard who they quote in sermons. They can easily grant authority and credibility to an author whose life doesn’t line up with their teachings.

Chances are, at the end of today, James MacDonald will still be on our shelves, but we’ll monitor the situation closely before making a knee-jerk reaction. Prayer helps as well!

January 7, 2019

Blogroll Update #10

My last update was in May. Some of these are simply updates, and some were in my computer under other categories. I have more Christian blogs bookmarked in my computer than anyone else in a three blog radius. (Seriously, there a couple thousand.) The list which appears on the blogroll in the right margin of the blog is always being updated.

Blogs
Daily Devotional from Popular Christian Television & Video Ministries Online
PCPJ | Pentecostals & Charismatics for Peace & Justice
Summit Life with J.D. Greear
Blog – Best Faith Based Movies
Thomas L Horrocks – Home
salternlite – The Gospel in All of Life
Best Faith Based Movies – Entertian Educate and Inspire
Salvage Unlimited – Because No Life Is Unsalvageable
Blog – Eric Geiger
Blog | Canadian Bible Society
Blog – Muddy Shoes
Having Two Legs – The blog of Toby J. Sumpter, Pastor at Christ Church in Moscow, ID
Out of the Ordinary
Becoming Less | “He must become greater; I must become less.” John 3:30
So What Faith — Greg Smith
Generation Next
Posts – the Way?
theburninglampdotcom | “You, O Lord, keep my lamp burning” Psalm 18:28
Ramblings on the Way
Alastair’s Adversaria | flotsam, jetsam, messages in bottles
Blogs – Life, Hope & Truth
Before The Cross | Glorifying God by Sharing the Love of Christ
Laughing in Disbelief –
covered in His dust
JoshuaReich.org | inspiring people to be more than they are
John Wesley Reid
It’s About Christ and His People
Bible Gateway Blog – News and reflections from BibleGateway.com
Naked Emperor Blog | Musing on media, tech and culture
Beautiful Christian Life
Byron Spradlin – Artists In Ministry & Missions
Dr. Claude Mariottini – Professor of Old Testament
Another Red Letter Day
My Morning Meal | Oh, taste and see that the Lord is good! (Psalm 34:8)
Experimental Theology
jeffreyoungblood | Thoughts from a blessed man
Thir.st
Overthinking Christian
Don’t Ask The Fish
Warren Throckmorton – new address
Encouraging and Challenging Content for those In Ministry
Kurt Willems | Theology Curator
Death • Fathom Mag
Letter & Liturgy – Christian Reviews of Ideas and Culture
The Cripplegate | for a new generation of non-conformists
Christian Creative Writers’ Collective
The Beautiful Spirit – Encouragement Through God’s Word
Pastor Brad Russell – Musings of a Husband, Father and Pastor
Joshua’s Outpost – Be a warrior in your faith
Christian Blogs and Sermons – Delivered By Grace
Home – GoThereFor.com
More Than Cake

 

The link to part one. (October, 2014…six years worth of links to that point)

The link to part two. (St. Patrick’s Day, 2015)

The link to part three. (May, 2015, also included my news sources to that point)

The link to part four. (August, 2015, included blog aggregators and people who do things similar to the Wednesday Link List or Wednesday Connect)

The link to part five. (August, 2016, a full year later)

The link to a mini update. (Just five weeks after part five the file was getting full again)

The link to part six. (January 2017)

The link to part seven (June 2017) 

The link to part eight (October 2017)

The link to part nine (May, 2018; included an updated list of Christian news sources)

 

December 27, 2018

By Their Libraries You Shall Judge Them

Filed under: books, Christianity — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 9:00 am


I just organized all of the books I’ve read and reviewed here in 10½ years, and some I re-read over the same time period.

They’re on five shelves in our living room. The same living room where people sit and talk and drink coffee and eat desserts when we have guests.

They’re all in alphabetical order.

And that’s the problem.

Alphabetical order is so patently unfair.

My bottom shelf contains A. W. Tozer. J. Warner Wallace. N. T. Wright. Philip Yancey.

These are people I would like to showcase. I’d like to have arrows pointing at these books or a flashing light that says, “Look at my library!” “These are the people I read.”

Instead, nobody can see the bottom shelf. It’s partly blocked by the end of the couch and rearranging that would be a major task.

It’s not that I care what people think of me; it’s just that as a book nerd, I want people to think that I read good authors.

Instead, they have a front row view to the top shelf.

My Rob Bell collection.


November 22, 2018

Christian Authors Who Go By Initials Only

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 9:32 am

Hint

“I’m not mentioning any names but their initials are…”

You’ve heard that before, I’m sure. So here are some of Christian publishing’s bestselling authors, people who go by two initials followed by a last name.

You have two assignments:

  • What is the missing surname?
  • What do the initials stand for?

Gather the family together and let’s play!

1.  C. S. __________

2.  A. W. __________

3.  A. B. __________

4.  R. T. __________

5.  R. C. __________

6.  J. I. __________

7.  N. T. __________

8.  D. A. __________

9.  G. K. __________

10.  E. M. __________

Bonus author:

J. R. R. __________

(Don’t forget the second part of the challenge: What do the initials stand for? Answers in the comment section in a couple of hours.)

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