Thinking Out Loud

May 4, 2018

Christian Author Flaunts Use of Vulgarity

Filed under: books, Christianity, missions — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:51 am

Don’t use foul or abusive language. Let everything you say be good and helpful, so that your words will be an encouragement to those who hear them.
 – Ephesians 4:29 NLT

Nor is it fitting for you to use language which is obscene, profane, or vulgar.
– Ephesians 5:4a GNT

The new book The Very Worst Missionary by Jamie Wright had the potential to speak to issues on which she is well-versed, such as ‘short-term mission trips as seen by a full time career missionary,’ along with other topics. Over the years I’ve read her takes on short-term missions and I think she has some very valid things to say.

Unfortunately for all, she’s somewhat sabotaged her prospects for this book’s wider acceptance with gratuitous use of profanity, vulgarity and expletives; furthermore, she’s proud of it. I’m not sure what this says about where she is currently at spiritually, or what it says about Convergent, a division (like Waterbrook) of Penguin Random House (PRH). 

That LifeWay doesn’t carry this shouldn’t be a surprise, but neither is it available through Christian Book Distributors (CBD).

She writes,

“I have no interest in pandering to a larger crowd for the sake of a bigger audience, even if it means I won’t get my message to as many people. This may shock you, but it’s not my purpose in life to tell the whole church and everyone in it my thoughts on God and faith and ministry and all that stuff. My goal here was to write a memoir, not a thesis, so my job was to write my story, my way, and that’s what I did. For any number of reasons, the language being only one, the book I released into the world isn’t gonna appeal or be palatable to a lot of people, and I’m 100% cool with that.”

“I don’t really care if some hyper conservative blowhards don’t hear those messages from me. If someone’s eyeballs are too righteously delicate too see “bad words” in print, or their earholes are too religiously tender for a little Audible profanity, then a book that uses the word “f**k” to talk about f**ked up missions obviously isn’t the right vehicle to get the message to them. Like, I’m just not their people and my book is not their book — and that’s cool…”  [edited]

Then, in the same blog post she totally flaunts her choice by listing all of the instances of swearing and invites readers to censor the book with a black sharpie if giving it to someone more sensitive. I’m including this here only to show those reading this the sheer volume of these which occur, though, in the spirit of the topic at hand, I’ve made a crude (pun intended) attempt to redact the words themselves:

I don’t want to seem hypocritical about this, but years ago the bookstore I own and manage decided to carry the testimony of Nadia Bolz-Weber, Pastrix, which has the f-word in the very first sentence. I think the packaging of that book and the fact it would only appeal to those who knew her story limited the possibility of accidentally being purchased by the wrong person, and we also added — and continue to add — a small warning sticker of our own to the back cover.

I’m not sure why I’m willing to give Nadia a pass and not Jamie, but each bookstore has to decide what works for them. I did have a white-haired grandmother rather deliberately purchase Nadia’s book and come back later to order multiple copies of it, and her book which followed.

The publisher writes:

The Very Worst Missionary is a disarming, ultimately inspiring spiritual memoir for well-intentioned contrarians everywhere. It will appeal to readers of Nadia Bolz-Weber, Jen Hatmaker, Ann Lamott, Jana Reiss, Mallory Ortberg, and Rachel Held Evans.”

That’s a rather narrow list.

It’s too bad that, a time when Christian authors, publishers and bookstores are struggling, an author would choose to deliberate his or her audience.

I like Jamie. I really do. I think her perspective needs to be shared. This choice of, for lack of a better term, lexical set was her decision and that of her publisher. I have to give them the benefit of the doubt that they feel they made this decision intelligently.

 

 

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1 Comment »

  1. I am disarmed by the increased vulgarity throughout society. I live in the same town as Nadia Webber and host a large Christian writer’s conference. She would have been easy to book — but i declined simply because of the language. What’s the purpose of talking like that? To tickle ears? To sound “in the world’? To me it’s very much like Paul, reminding us that although we have liberty, not all of it is beneficial.

    Comment by davidrupert — May 6, 2018 @ 11:25 pm


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