Thinking Out Loud

August 10, 2017

Rob Bell Responds to All Your Questions

The pastor and I had talked for more than an hour. The topics had shifted quickly and covered a wide swath of theology, ecclesiology, culture, ethics and church history. Several times I had to ask what the connection was between something he had said, and what had been said just a sentence earlier. But it was all stimulating, even invigorating.

So when the time ended, I got up to leave and said, “That was awesome. I really enjoyed our time together. That was deadly serious and a lot of fun at the same time.”

And then, before I turned to go out the door, I added, “But you know…you never actually answered my initial question.”


Answers are what people want. Especially if the person being asked is somewhat controversial. But perhaps we North Americans and Western Europeans are simply too destination oriented. Maybe we need to enjoy the process or the journey more than fret the arrival.

Rob Bell’s newest book What is the Bible: How an Ancient Library of Poems, Letters and Stories Can Transform the Way You Think and Feel about Everything (HarperOne) is based on a series of Tumblr posts he has been doing over the last two years. Most of the articles were removed with the arrival of the book — something his publisher probably insisted on — but as I remember it, many were driven by reader questions.

Those readers got responses. I don’t know if they got the answers they desired, but speaking for myself, I’ll take some of these replies over a direct answer any day. And many times, Bell is really clear we’re asking the wrong questions in the first place.

For example, take the chapter titled, Is the Bible inerrant? For Bell this is like asking,

Did Mozart’s symphonies win?
In your estimation, has Mozart prevailed?
Do Mozart’s songs take the cake?
Are his concertos true?   (p.279)

and if you’re willing to concede any ground to him at all, he does make his point well, even if it’s not the direct answer you were hoping for. He says it’s the wrong question.

He encourages readers to read the Bible literately instead of literally — I would argue for the use of literaturely — knowing what genre they were seeing and then examining it appropriately on that basis.  (p.80)

Bible narratives come to life as never before. How did that woman in John 8 get caught in the act of adultery in the first place? Bell sees the clue in John 7; this is a festival not unlike our Creation Festival here or Greenbelt in the UK; it’s a religious camping event; there is much wine; someone ends up in the wrong tent. (pp 26-28) I can personally attest there isn’t much privacy at such things when the tents are sandwiched in close, though there was no alcohol factor at Creation.

Melchizedek? Bell writes that Abraham has been promised that God is going to do a new thing through him. He begins a covenant with Abraham. Something that has not existed prior. But then along comes “a priest of God Most High.” So there’s already a thing. An ongoing thing. A thing that’s been taking place long enough for there to be a priesthood. And even though we’re only 14 chapters in, the writer of Genesis assumes we get what that means. Long before the birth of Levi, there is already the notion of an ecclesiastic structure; within it a group that is set apart — by the designation priest — to serve in some capacity related to the sacrificial system which, in chapter 14, is just beginning. As Bell puts it,

If this is a story about the new thing God is doing, how come a character shows up who is already in on the new thing God is doing? (p.146)

For Bell there is a connectivity between portions of scripture we’ve perhaps never linked before. He starts out in the gospels and the whisks us to I Kings and just when we’ve caught our breath we’re in Psalms. All in the space of two pages. For Bell, genealogies are a ride at the amusement park, and the people with the weird names are the stuff of great theater. You end up thinking, ‘I really should read the Bible more often.’

And there are the personal moments. We’ve all heard the story of Bell’s first speaking engagement at a Christian camp, but the story of his first practice sermon in school was new to me. He knows he wants to reinvent the wheel so to speak, and so launches into a prototype of the prophetic Rob Bell style with which we’ve become familiar. The other students’ and the professor’s reactions coincide with a page turn, as you turn over the leaf, you’re expecting a certain type of response.

So as to the question at hand, what is the Bible?

Bell’s answer is not entirely radical. I’m not sure that I’d put this in the “first book for a new Christian to read” but you could do much worse. Better a response filled with life and dimension than something clinical. Twice Bell reminds us, as he has stated elsewhere previously, that the ancients regarded the scriptures as a fine gem which, when turned in different directions, reflects and refracts the light in a multitude of patterns and hues. It’s no accident that Bell’s book’s cover mimics this, appearing differently depending on how it’s being held…

…Preparing this review, I found myself diving back into familiar chapters. There’s no time to start from scratch right now, but I will probably use this a reference when reexamining key Bible passages. For the legion of Bell critics: Consider the potential audience. Through HarperOne, this book was available in airport gift shops and general market booksellers worldwide. It’s not an academic treatise on the meaning of the entire Bible, but an introduction for people who might want a fresh take on a belief system from which they may have once walked away.


A copy of What is the Bible was provided long after the standard review window had closed by Mark at HarperCollins Christian Publishing Canada.

 

 

 

 

 

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1 Comment »

  1. Quote: “Twice Bell reminds us, as he has stated elsewhere previously, that the ancients regarded the scriptures as a fine gem which, when turned in different directions, reflects and refracts the light in a multitude of patterns and hues.”
    ~ Paul Wilkinson referencing Rob Bell

    … yeah, about that. Kind of a slippery slope, that approach. Tends to make the bible sound more ‘flexy’ than Scripture, albeit provided to us via the hand and voices of men (under the direction of God’s powerful – knows what He’s doing – Spirit), was meant to be. Fanciful language or reflection does not a true statement make. As for how ‘the ancients’ (in this case, the early church fathers) regarded the words of the New Testament, we’d do well to reflect on that maybe?

    I very serendipitously happened to fall upon this article yesterday or the day before:

    http://www.alisachilders.com/blog/did-early-christians-believe-the-bible-was-inspired-inerrant-and-authoritative?utm_content=buffer83402&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    Inerrancy is not everyone’s bag, nor does it have to be if those people know the defining (or well-defined) truths of Christ, God and His Gospel. But it’s probably not smart to think that our reading the bible ‘literately’ (as per Rob Bell’s terminology) makes us wiser than inerrancy-adherents either. Interpretation that leads to interpolation begets error, and fairly quickly, if the multiplicity of Christian sects that border on cultism is any indication of that. Reading exegetical materials by the likes of Kenneth Bailey and his ilk would be a greater boon to our understanding of God’s words to man, rather than trusting the likes of Bell who is not a highly studied New Testament scholar.

    Also, your statement, “Maybe we need to enjoy the process or the journey more than fret the arrival.” That’s not how the New Testament writers approached the sanctity of the soul. Jesus first tells us to ‘store up for ourselves treasures in heaven’ and Peter the Apostle was ‘somewhat’ focused on the destination of the soul, wouldn’t you say?

    “This inheritance is kept in heaven for you, who through faith are shielded by God’s power until the coming of the salvation that is ready to be revealed in the last time. 6 In all this you greatly rejoice, though now for a little while you may have had to suffer grief in all kinds of trials. These have come so that the proven genuineness of your faith—of greater worth than gold, which perishes even though refined by fire—may result in praise, glory and honor when Jesus Christ is revealed. Though you have not seen him, you love him; and even though you do not see him now, you believe in him and are filled with an inexpressible and glorious joy, for you are receiving the end result of your faith, the salvation of your souls.”
    1 Peter 1:4-9

    And as for our needing to ‘enjoy the process’ … uh, I’m not really enjoying the process some days (living the life, walking the walk, enduring the pain of body and severe depressive attacks I am subject to of late), but I am receiving enough grace to get through the rough times. Times where I carry a cross and fall so often as I do. I will be sending you by email a sermon that I actually gave – all of 10 minutes – at one of our former churches entitled, “Journey or Destination” that deals with this very perspective.

    Lastly, with so many statements from Rob Bell pointing to his fairly heretical departure from biblical Christianity, I am concerned for anyone reading his material and not taking the Berean approach to ‘read the Scriptures daily to find out of what Paul – or Rob, in this case – said was true’. To assert he is heretical doesn’t take much effort to back up, should anyone search for his direct quotes on important matters:

    Rob Bell, Velvet Elvis, 130: “I can’t find one place in the teachings of Jesus, or the Bible for that matter, where we are to identify ourselves first and foremost as sinners.”

    Rob Bell and Don Golden, Jesus Wants to Save Christians, 179: “Jesus wants to save us from making the good news about another world and not this one. Jesus wants to save us from preaching a gospel that is only about individuals and not about the systems that enslave them. Jesus wants to save us from shrinking the gospel down to a transaction about the removal of sin and not about every single particle of creation being reconciled to its maker.”

    https://www.charismanews.com/opinion/in-the-line-of-fire/48383-rob-bell-trashes-the-bible-on-oprah

    You also say, “For the legion of Bell critics: Consider the potential audience. Through HarperOne, this book was available in airport gift shops and general market booksellers worldwide. It’s not an academic treatise on the meaning of the entire Bible, but an introduction for people who might want a fresh take on a belief system from which they may have once walked away.”

    While you’re at it, hand them a copy of Watchtower Magazine … it’ll get people thinking about God, right? But WHICH god? The god we would fabricate (like an idol … a craven image) so that easy-believism draws people into the churches so they maybe/might get saved? How much do we have to flex in terms of our root theology/creeds/core-beliefs in order to get people interested in the Gospel? Yes, be “all things to all men”, but knowing what that truly entails (based on context of the text) has little to do with what Rob Bell is selling, from what I can tell. What is better: a stronger apologetic based on good study and exposition of Scripture or throwing out ear-tickling niceties that make people feel better about a version of God as is now being presented by the likes of Rob Bell?

    Do you really want people to get a fresh – excuse me, WRONG – take on the belief system from which they may have once walked away? Is this what missional thinking is becoming to Christians now? Not saying that EVERYTHING of Rob Bell’s need be discarded. But if a tooth’s roots are decaying, you gotta pull the tooth. Rob Bell’s theology lacks bite … and that’s why it will reel in the masses. We were warned about this by the very Scriptures that Bell proposes we not take as literally … that certainly works in his favour then, yeah?
    ~F.R.

    Comment by flagrantregard — August 10, 2017 @ 8:06 pm


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