Thinking Out Loud

June 9, 2017

What Will We Do In Heaven? (Part One)

Filed under: Christianity — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 10:43 am

If you’re a Type-A personality, you thrive on busy-ness and activity. When you think in terms of heaven — by which I mean more accurately new earth — you want to know there will be projects, and programs, and goals; oh my!

This was the topic we were wrestling with in a one hour phone conference call last night involving my wife and myself and our youngest son.

Part of it had to do with the completion of things we’ve been involved in here and now; a carry forward of the things we enjoy doing or are gifted in doing.

When it started out, we were looking at the continuation of marriage in heaven. (Though the conversation later expanded to include vocation.)

“If marriage ends in heaven, what’s the point of marriage on earth”

I did some searching online and came up with these:

Focus on the Family:

Jesus did say that life in the world to come will not include “marriage” as we know it here on earth. When questioned by the Sadducees about this, He said, “In the resurrection they neither marry nor are given in marriage, but are like angels of God in heaven” (Matthew 22:30). Your friend may lack sensitivity, but her comment does have a strong biblical basis.What Jesus did not say was that “all earthly relationships will be nullified in heaven.” There is no good reason to put such a negative spin on His words. We will most certainly be together with those we love in the next life. We just don’t know precisely what form that “togetherness” will take.

Look at it this way. Human relationships will certainly be different in heaven. But they cannot possibly be less than what they have been on earth. They will have to be different in the sense of being something more, something better, something far more fulfilling and satisfying than we can presently imagine. That’s part of the glory of the resurrected life.

GotQuestions.org:

Most likely, there will be no marriage in heaven simply because there will be no need for it. When God established marriage, He did so to fill certain needs. First, He saw that Adam was in need of a companion. “The LORD God said, ‘It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper suitable for him’” (Genesis 2:18). Eve was the solution to the problem of Adam’s loneliness, as well as his need for a “helper,” someone to come alongside him as his companion and go through life by his side. In heaven, however, there will be no loneliness, nor will there be any need for helpers. We will be surrounded by multitudes of believers and angels (Revelation 7:9), and all our needs will be met, including the need for companionship.

Second, God created marriage as a means of procreation and the filling of the earth with human beings. Heaven, however, will not be populated by procreation. Those who go to heaven will get there by faith in the Lord Jesus Christ; they will not be created there by means of reproduction. Therefore, there is no purpose for marriage in heaven since there is no procreation or loneliness.

I do prefer the first answer.

But then the conversation shifted to looking at things like works of art, writing, etc. Does any of that carry forward?

I thought of a couple of scriptures:

Heaven and earth will pass away but my words will not pass away.   (Matthew 24:35 NIV)

Without exception every single translation in BibleGateway.com preserved the word words. Personally, I’ve always interpreted this as having to do with God’s laws and principles; so I read this as ‘but my truth will remain.’ (Apparently I’d make a bad Bible translator.)

The other scripture was:

Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; Every man’s work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man’s work of what sort it is. – (1 Cor 3:12-13; KJV is how I learned this, you can substitute straw for stubble.)

The idea of this present world ending in fire is found in Revelation and has several interpretations, including a nuclear fallout resulting in a reordering of everything from plant life to continents, including even the tilt of the earth which causes the seasons. (As a Canadian, I want to be done with winter.)

Frankly, I think most of what I produce in a day falls into the wood, hay and stubble category. Especially when seen from an eternal perspective. But the original question had to do writings.

Now if we are “known as we are known” in heaven — which doesn’t actually mean what most people think it does, but let’s assume some identity carries forward — then as surely as I might walk up to David and say, ‘That was cool how you got Goliath on the first stone;’ someone might walk up to me and say, ‘I really liked that particular blog post you wrote about [subject]; it changed my life.’1

So in a sense our writings — if we are part of the one-third of the world which commits things to print — could survive in a sense.

Tomorrow we’ll get back more directly to the idea of progression in heaven; of building — I want to avoid the word working — toward a specific objective. Type A people stay tuned.


1 Maybe not this blog post.

 

 

 

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1 Comment »

  1. Interesting discussion. I’ve never really thought about the _content_ of heaven, beyond eternally being with Christ. A lot of what people say about it seems wildly speculative, and that basically turns me off the whole subject. I’m glad you’re taking a more sober approach – I might even have to start thinking about this myself ….

    Comment by Paul Martin Waters — June 9, 2017 @ 2:16 pm


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