Thinking Out Loud

August 4, 2015

An Alternative Worship Menu

Filed under: Christianity, Church, music, worship — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:57 am

I don’t get to lead worship now as often as I once did, but enjoy writing on the subject from the perspective of someone who has been on both sides of the platform. Recently Worship Links contacted me about doing a guest post for them, which ran last week. (I told they they’d have the first chance to run it.) Now it’s time for y’all to have a look at it here.


article for Worship Links

The Hidden Menu

The Roland keyboard our church bought more than twenty years ago had 32 basic sounds, but if you held the “A” bank key down at the same time as you turned on the power, a larger, 128-sound hidden menu unfolded. While we didn’t use them all, we used them frequently, though most of the time Piano-1 was the default setting, as I suspect it is at most churches.

In our family, the term “hidden menu” became synonymous with a whole lot of things. When the car CD player quit on a road trip, we were forced to scan the FM dial from top to bottom, and finding nothing to our liking, I said, “Where’s the hidden menu?” We don’t have cable or satellite and don’t watch a lot of television, but on one search throughout a rather large number of broadcast signals, my wife turned and said, “Try the hidden menu.”

Sometimes I find myself in a worship service where I keep thinking there’s something else we should be doing with that time. As someone who has spent years leading worship myself, I think I approach this time with a positive attitude, but there are days when I consider the possibility that just listening to the original recordings of the compositions and singing along might be an improvement on what the worship team is attempting. Or doing a morning of classic Christian camp and retreat songs. Or rediscovering some obscure hymns. Or getting all liturgical and mixing readings with chorus or bridge sections of songs for which we don’t need projected lyrics.

Then, a few weeks ago, it occurred to me that perhaps I had already found the hidden menu.

About a year ago I wrote a blog post titled Who Says Youth Groups Won’t Sing? It centered around an eight-minute video posted by the Rural Hill Church of Christ, who operate a summer camp, which has a section at the front of one of their buildings called The Singing Porch. With no musical instruments, these kids were singing with a passion and energy that would be foreign to many churches, especially those small to medium churches trying to do today’s modern worship songs but without the luxury of Hillsong’s or North Point’s band, and thereby forced into a situation where the audience stands politely but is afraid to truly sing out.

I did some further exploration of the Church of Christ, and particularly their a capella music tradition. I listened to YouTube videos for hours. I kept coming back to the above mentioned video, especially “Let it Rise” and the part at the six-minute mark where they show a few seconds of “Get Right Church.” I know I might not be able to sell this at your church, but I kept wishing I could bottle some of this and take it to my church. Honestly, our relationship to many of the songs we sing on Sunday morning can only be described as passive. These kids were engaged.

Another way is possible.

That got me thinking about another experience we had, visiting an alternative service in an Episcopalian church and being introduced to the music of Taizé. This form involves taking very short lyrical fragments and building them into short pieces which are then sung in very easy-to-learn parts. It’s what we call a round in children’s ministry, but it wasn’t so long ago — recall “Father, I Adore You” — that this was part of weekend service sets. Taizé is more liturgical and more meditative. Call it soaking music for Anglicans. You can learn more at the movement’s website, or through a simple YouTube search.

Both the a capella style of the Church of Christ and the liturgical-flavored form of Taizé may seem too traditional for you, but studies over the past year seem to indicate that Millennials are looking for something more than what our Top-40 worship songs and bland contemporary Church architecture have on offer. The late Robert Webber proposed a model of blended worship that gave rise to the term ancient/future, but some of the surveys suggest some twenty-somethings are willing to just explore ancient.

I would wager to say that some of them are looking for the hidden menu, and I think you can consider other musical options without sacrificing the relevance of your preaching or the programs and ministries that everyone assumes are provide a younger demographic appeal.

Leave a Comment »

No comments yet.

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Your Response (Value-Added Comments Only)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: