Thinking Out Loud

October 25, 2014

Peeking Inside Paul’s Computer: Christian Blog List

Okay, you need to be a Christian blog nerd to appreciate this, but I thought today I’d give you an inside look at my computer; specifically, all the Christian blogs that I have bookmarked there.  The blogroll you see in the right margin of Thinking Out Loud is just a small part of a bigger picture.  So here they are in no particular order, except that the first 40 or so are kinda on speed-dial — remember that Seinfeld episode? — and the bottom 40 or so have been added more recently. But otherwise, there’s no predictable pattern.  If you see anything here that’s not a blog, or a link that’s become corrupted, let me know. Also note that missing in this list are several blogs that I consider more as news sites, a handful of Patheos blogs, and also missing (because they’re in another directory) are about 30 blogs that do things similar to the Wednesday Link List. Have fun!

Stuff Fundies Like
Marketing Christian Books
Hear the Voice Blog
Without Wax
The Tony Jones Blog
ToddRhoades.com | Pastors and Church Leader News and Opinion
Phil Vischer
internetmonk.com
Blog |Philip Yancey
On Faith & Culture | Jonathan Merritt’s blog at Religion News Service
Parchment and Pen | Making Theology Accessible
Blog – ReKnew
Red Letter Christians – What if Jesus Really Meant What He Said?
The Master’s Table
blog.worship.com
NewSmallChurch.com
SKYEBOX » the weblog of Skye Jethani
Jon Acuff — Author | Speaker | Awesome
The Wartburg Watch
FBC Jax Watchdog
FaithVillage | MOVE YOUR FAITH HERE
holy heteroclite:
holy heteroclite
Bene Diction Blogs On
Beliefs of the Heart
The blog of Matthew Paul Turner
Rachel Held Evans | Rachel’s Blog Articles
Darrell Creswell’s Blog
Lorna Dueck: Her thoughts on world issues from a Christian Perspective
Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove —
Passionately His
churchrelevance.com
ThinkChristian.net – Blogging about the intersection of faith and culture
Another Red Letter Day
onehandclapping —
LeadingSmart
Trey Morgan.net
Refine Us | To remove impurities from something…
Blog In My Own Eye
Jamie the Very Worst Missionary
Blog and Mablog
Reclaiming the Mission :: The Weblog of David Fitch
THE ORPHAN AGE
Brad Lomenick
One Passion One Devotion
Eric Metaxas » Blog
Kouya Chronicle
The Thinklings
rob bell
Red-Letter Believers
Cindy by the Sea
IVP – Andy Unedited
Lifestream Blog
Bruxy | The web site
The Heart Of The Matter
Donald Miller’s Blog — Best-Selling Author Of Books, And Stuff
Shaun Groves
Reformed Arminian Blog
Cold Case Christianity by J. Warner Wallace – Christian Apologetics
learning my lines. . .
David Kenney – Reciprocal Ecclesiology in a Pseudo Post-Modern Malaise.
Karen Spears Zacharias
The Bible and Culture — A One-Stop Shop for All Things Biblical and Christian
Pastor Steven Furtick
The Church of No People
City of God -
Soulfari
BadCatholic
Revitalize Your Church
Cain’s Wife Answer
Digging a lot
LarkNews.com
Quantum Tea – UK God Blogs
Glocal Christianity
Theophilus Monk’s Christian Faith & Theology Weblog
the Jesus Manifesto
Prodigal Magazine
Faith Blogs
http://catchjohnfischer.wordpress.com/
Losing My Religion
jonnybaker
A Living Alternative Our Missional Pilgrimage
Kruse Kronicle
Soiled Wings
300 words a day
Homebrewed Christianity
Zac Hicks – Worship. Church. Theology. Culture. – Zac Hicks Blog
My World
Will Mancini
CBMW » Gender Blog
http://jennicatron.tv/
TheWorshipCommunity.Com – Worship Leader Resources, Articles, Forums
Rumblings
Activate CFPL – Blog
Clarion: Journal of Spirituality and Justice
http://5ptsalt.com/
Sand in the Gears
Jesus Creed
American Jesus
Daily Christian Quotations
Semicolon | Books we must have though we lack bread.
God Is My Constant
Growing in Faith
reboot christianity
Mockingbird
The Bible and Culture
Calvinistic Cartoons
The Bible Hunter
Church and Family Cartoons by Tim Walburg
Simply Church: A House Church Perspective
Searching for grace
Strengthened by Grace
Journey of Worship | Thoughts and experiences on the journey of worship
Cake Or Death (Christian Church cartoons by Alex Baker)
People of the Second Chance | Overthrow Judgment. Liberate Love.
More Christ
Murray’s Musings
Till He Comes | Bringing Scripture and Theology to Life
God Discussion | For Seekers Who Don’t Go To Church
whyismarko — life, faith, youth ministry, emerging church, leadership, whimsy
Zombies. Theology. Whatever | Pastor Matt
http://goandmake.ca/
Faith In The Journey
I’m Waiting
Newgenesis Resurrection Ministries
Right Wing Watch
Living Proof Ministries Blog
Blog | Zondervan Author Mark Buchanan
jeff mikels
Musings by Robert
A Joyful Noise
Big Ear Creations
America’s Next Top Mommy
Dan White Jr.
Practical Faith
God Speaks I Listen
5:21 | Life & Gospel Reflections
the blue fish project (dave bish)
Wayne Stiles
Based on a True Story | Nathan Colquhoun
http://dbts.edu/blog/
Tall Monastic Guy
Gay Christian Movement Watch
JANELLE KEITH
Blue Letter Bible: The Blog | the official blog of blueletterbible.org
Straight-Friendly
Truthinator’s Blog
Glory to God for All Things
Mike King
The Radical.net Blog
Coming Out Christian — Conversations about being Christian and gay in America
RenaissanceNow | Ubi Caritas et Amor, Deus Ibi Est
Chilly Chilton | Christian | Husband | Father | Mentor | Pastor | Friend | Detroit
Jesus, I will follow you.
The Domain for Truth
A Deeper Story | Tales of Christ and Culture
FROM LEE IN TENNESSEE
the gospel side | The ruminations of a kyriarchist.
The King’s Presence
extraecclesiam…
The Journeyman’s Files
Bob Hostetler’s Prayer Blog
Created to Give God Glory
Looking Through the Windshield
The Prodigal Thought | Pointing prodigal thoughts towards the truth.
Sometimes a Light – Blog
Sue’ s considered trifles
ISTORIA MINISTRIES BLOG
Ralph Howe Blogs
connexions
Reflections | The High Calling
Digging the Word
once for all delivered
The Lewis Crusade | Fighting for human dignity, the worth of the disabled, the salvation of souls and the Gospel of Life
Blogotional
Daily Devotionals, Free Christian Bible Devotions Online
The Bridge Chicago
supersimbo | Christian/Husband/Blogger/Designer/Beard Enthusiast
Modern Reject – Nicole Cottrell: Writer, Speaker, Button-pusher
Christian Film Blog: CFDb’s Blog – Annelie’s Christian Film World Blog | Find Christian Movies on CFDb: Largest list of Christian Films
Prodigal Magazine – The Christian Magazine For Storytellers
Just My Thoughts
efcgraceblog | Thoughts on my never-ending search for grace.
Gestating A Church | Reflections on planting a new church for sinners, saints, and skeptics who join God in the renewal of all things
FaithsMessenger.Com
Bob Rogers | Pastor, First Baptist Church of Rincon, Georgia
Sunday| Magazine – A free online mag all about the creative side of Sundays.
Andy Stanley | Helping Leaders Go Further Faster
The High Calling
More Christ
Bouncing Back — Bouncing back from adversity; Moving forward with hope.
anabaptistly | attempting missional anabaptist living
Java Juice Blog House – FaithVillage | MOVE YOUR FAITH HERE
Doctrine Matters | Bible truths from www.BibleDebates.info
The Palmer Perspective
The Nuance | trailblazing beyond black & white
ChristianBlessings | CLICK A BLESSING TODAY
Pastor Dave Online | Reflections on Christ and Culture
the gospel side | The ruminations of a kyriarchist.
Please Convince Me
re-Ver(sing) Verses | reading, singing, analyzing verses
GrowDeep
Church Curmudgeon (ChrchCurmudgeon) on Twitter
thehopeforlife | Finding true freedom through Jesus
:: We Are Soma » Blog ::
CROSS-SHAPED STUFF | i want to see more stuff shaped like a cross
Joel J. Miller — Where Christian Theology Meets Daily Life
FAITH BOGDANlive well-loved by God! – Blog
Both/And. | Seeking–or making–a third way.
Canadian Writers Who Are Christian
Breaking News Pimp Preacher.com & The Church Folk Revolution
A Geek in the Wilderness – One geek/nerd hybrid journeys through history and the world in an epic search for truth, justice… and great pizza.
July | 2013 | ItsTholhuGospel
dianelindstrom | Overflow
As the Deer
(32) twentyonehundred productions
EerdWord | The blog of Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
PiH Today
Gordon Rumford Ministries
Adam Young
Incourage — daily devotional for women
Reason for Change | Theology isn’t science; it’s art.
Tall Skinny Kiwi » Brand spankin’ new site for tsk
Christian in the Rough — Finding fun in the middle of dysfunction, action at the end of distraction, and grace at the end of disgrace.
Given Breath
lotharlorraine | 4 out of 5 dentists recommend this WordPress.com site
[iDisciple] – Abiding in Christ, Growing in Community, Bearing Fruit
http://www.thepoachedegg.net/
Christian Funny Pictures – A time to laugh
A Parched Soul | Grayson Pope’s blog
Crossroad Junction
the banksyboy brief
when love comes to town
Stand to Reason
Roll to Disbelieve | Grab your 20-siders. We’re going in.
Home – Denison Forum on Truth and Culture
emily t. wierenga
Rebecca Writes – Rebecca Writes
The TallSkinnyKiwi Daily
MEETING IN THE CLOUDS | CLOUDWATCHER’S LIFE STORY and inspirational thoughts
Twitter / AbandonedPics: Abandoned church seems to still …
Christian Forum Site – Welcome to a Friendly Fellowship
the Cripplegate | for a new generation of non-conformists
Author Tricia Goyer
Restoring Significance
Peter Chin – husband, father, pastor, writer | Home
Blogging Theologically | Jesus, Books, Culture, & Theology
The Revangelical Blog – Revangelical Blog – Brandan Robertson- Rethinking. Reforming. Renewing.
Redemption Pictures
Blog – Jeremy Binns
the kiddy pool
Formerly Fundie — Insights, Hopes and Laments on American Christianity
Wordgazer’s Words
Receive with Meekness
Words of Life | Empowering Conversations to Help You Apply the Lifechanging Truths of the Bible
Blogs | Going Beyond Ministries
Catholic Memes
The Ironic Catholic
Defeating the Dragons | overcoming a fundamentalist indoctrination.
reformation 21 | Online Magazine of the Alliance of Confessing Evangelicals
Thoughts about God – Daily Devotionals
Feeding on Christ – Reformed theological resources
Adrian Warnock — Patheos Evangelical
SharperIron | Thinking is fundamental
Love, Joy, Feminism —
H . A | Welcome to Homeschoolers Anonymous.
thatmom.com
Abundant Life Now
Blog | Vince Antonucci
JASON JOHNSON | BLOG
Well Spent Journey
Sandra Stanley
Sam Storms: Oklahoma City, OK > Enjoying God Blog
Abnormal Anabaptist | Come and read what it means to be abnormally Anabaptist. It might surprise you.
TALITHA KUM
Mormon411
Worn Pages
Curious Christian
Church Marketing Sucks
VergeNetwork – YouTube
thexiansatirist | because Xians can be worthy of ridicule…
The Wardrobe Door
Red Letter Believers – Christian Answers for the Curious and the Thoughtful
John H Armstrong | Reflections of a Missional-Ecumenist
No Longer Quivering —
For His Glory | If anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation…
Holy Soup – Innovative approaches to ministry.
Faith and Theology
Web devotions
Running the Good Race | “Let us run with perseverance …
The Bible Hunter
clarke’s SOAPBOX – . . . as if I don’t say enough on Sunday mornings!
The thought just occurred to me
Tim’s Blog – Just One Train Wreck After Another
Theo-sophical Ruminations | Theological and philosophical musings
A Cry For Justice | Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence
Agog4God | A Gathering of Girlfriends & Guys for GodAgog4God
Confessions of a Funeral Director » @ the Crossroads of this World & the Next
More Than Coping | Mental Illness And The Christian
MANTURITY.COM — REDEFINE MATURITY
Ask Sister Mary Martha
Good Question | A blog by Christopher R. Smith,
Ben Irwin
Liz Boltz Ranfeld
James Pedlar
Pastoralized
The Revangelical Blog – The Revangelical Movement Blog, Podcast, Review
Sermons from a Psycho
Of Dust & Kings – Empowering Faith. Transforming Culture.
Revitalize Your Church
These Christian Times | Prophecy, bible, entertainment and current events
Get Along With God | A blog about discovering a God worth knowing.
Imago Dei
Blog | Practical ShepherdingPractical Shepherding
The Roundabout Way
reboot christianity
The Wanderer | “As I walked through the wilderness of this world . . .”
FaithsMessenger.Com
The Sometimes Preacher | Reflections on Jesus, Scripture, Theology, Ministry, and Church.
Glory to God for All Things | Orthodox Christianity, Culture and Religion
martyduren.com
I am Phoenix
Joy Phenix’s Blog | Joy : Defined
Launch Clarity
InsaneFaithNow | Aspects of life in a post-modern world…
Andrew Knott.org | Empowering Prayer, Encouraging People
ALIFESANCTIFIED.COM
Christianity | Not For Itching Ears
Christian Blog
Liberate
Christian Crier — For Ye That Have Ears To Hear
Gloria Furman
Ben Irwin
Brian Zahnd – Full-time pastor. Occasional author. Would-be mountaineer
BHBlog – Telligent
Christian Gravy
The Church of No People
Blog | CPYU
MomLife Today | EVERY MOMent COUNTS!
Missio Alliance
Blog – The Malphurs Group : The Malphurs Group
Youth For Truth U.S.A.
nish weiseth
The Narthex — Medium
Do Right Christians | WHAT KILLS YOU MAKES YOU STRONGER! ROMANS 8:13, 7:24-25 |AN IFB MINISTRY
Blog — Nancy Beach
Create With Joy | Infuse Creativity In All You Do
Blog | Mere Orthodoxy | Christianity, Politics, and Culture
Faith Beyond Belief
Borrowed Light – that Christ may be the only boast of this generation
Psephizo – scholarship. serving. ministry.
Eugene Cho
theologygrams | Theology explained in diagrams
Ministry Matters™
Mercy Not Sacrifice — The blog of Morgan Guyton
Back Row Online | #BeUndignified
ItsTholhuGospel | I Love God, I Love People, I Love Music…I Am TholhuGospel
Blog | Kate Conner
Real World Worship Leading | A Blog For Worship Leaders Who Lead Normal People In Normal Churches ||| RealWorldWorship.Org
Theoblogy — The Tony Jones Blog at Patheos
Simplify This Life
SonWorshiper | Literary Karaoke
Faith & Frivolity
Possessing the Treasure
The Lonely Pilgrim | A Christian’s Road Home to Rome and Journey Onward
sevennotesofgrace | musing about music and its Creator
Jamie Ivey
We Are Worship
Christianity 201
Get Better Today

September 27, 2014

What I’m Hoping to Accomplish Here

Filed under: writing — Tags: , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:50 am

Thinking Out Loud ScreenshotIn theory anyway, some day I’ll look back at what’s posted here and possibly regret a few articles and might start deleting some. But in the meantime, I try to deliver a decent product 7-days-a-week to my readers.  Here are some questions I must either ask now or ask later…

1. Was it informative?

My opinions leach out all over this blog, but hopefully I also provide raw information, spot new trends, help readers make connections to other resources, and even educate my readership about things they didn’t know.

2. Was it helpful?

The passing on of information by itself doesn’t really guarantee that reading said articles will make any difference in the life of readers. My goal should be to communicate for life change; to write in the hope that the day’s topics and focus is not only interesting but practical and beneficial.

3. Was I authentic?

People create all types of false personas on social media. I don’t want people to meet me in the real world and find me to be anything less than what my online trail would indicate. That includes the possibility of me deceiving myself into thinking that by virtue of this blog — and its numeric success — that I’m something I am not.

4. Was it fruitful?

The first three questions were probably sufficient, and I could have left it there, but one of the things I long for on a personal level is to see the fruit of the various endeavors that occupy my time. It’s not a matter of looking for validation as much as simply wanting to experience that organic moment when the seed takes root in the lives of people both individually and collectively. I think it’s a question we need to ask of anything we’re involved in.

September 21, 2014

Climbing the Ministry Ladder

Filed under: Church, ministry, writing — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:25 am

Conrad sat in the living room staring at the “yearbook” that Central Church had given him when he resigned several years ago. Well, “resigned” wasn’t exactly the right word, but other than that, there was nothing about his time pastoring the 700-member church that did not evoke fond memories.  He was only the third pastor Central had ever known, and while he did not experience the rapid growth of his predecessors, he’d seen the church grow from 556 members to 703.

Not that it was about numbers.  Well, maybe it was. His first church was 168 members, but he was only there for three years. Then he jumped at the opportunity to go to a 289 member church, where he stayed for five years. Next, he entered a four year term with the 374 member — oh, my goodness; it really was about numbers; he couldn’t believe he had remembered all that detail.

Short StoriesBut Central was the pinnacle as it turned out, twelve years, and average weekend attendance just under a thousand in two services, with 703 of those people full members.

And then he got sent to East Valley on an interim pastor assignment, that ended up lasting six years. Smaller numerically. A little backward culturally. He was balding now and the 414-member church was an older demographic that signified, along with his own age, the numbers might start dropping. And then it did.

Before he knew it, he was doing a meaningless job in the district office waiting out the years to retirement. He had ridden the entire parabolic curve of church size.

He put the yearbook down and sighed.

“You’d better get ready to go;” his wife Carla admonished from the kitchen, “The service at Whispering Willows starts at 2:00 PM.”

So this is what it comes to, he thought.  Sunday afternoon chapel services in the local seniors’ home.

The pianist assigned from the Salvation Army didn’t know any of the hymns he’d bookmarked. “We tend to do Army music;” she confessed, “But I can do Amazing Grace and How Great Thou Art.”

“That’s all they ever want to sing anyway;” Conrad told her, and at 1:55 Whispering Willows staff started wheeling in the dozen-and-a-half women and three men who had signed up to go to chapel that week, plus two staff. Okay, a few of the residents used walkers, but he noticed that everybody that week had some type of appliance necessary to get them around.

At 2:00 he opened in prayer.  At 2:01 they sang How Great Thou Art. At 2:05 they sang Amazing Grace. At 2:08 he asked the pianist if she would play a little number from her Salvation Army hymnal. She gladly obliged, but the tune was unfamiliar and the melody was incomprehensible. But now it was 2:10.

Conrad checked his watch again. These services ran an hour, usually 40 minutes of singing and a 20 minute message. He knew he needed to stretch, so he asked if anyone had any prayer requests. “Just put your hands up.”

Surprisingly a woman in the second row did just that. He nodded toward her to share anything with the group and she said, “This isn’t the dining room.”

“No it isn’t;” Conrad replied.

Silence.

More silence. He noticed the ticking of a mantle clock he’d never noticed before. Things had never been this quiet.

“You know;” the retired pastor said, “I come here each month and I’ve never really told you much about myself, so before I share today’s scripture reading and message, perhaps I should share my story.”

So he spoke about his call to ministry late in high school, and how he had gone off to his denomination’s Bible college, and how he graduated and started climbing the ministry ladder. The problem was, as he had done before leaving for Whispering Willows, he was sharing more about the metrics of the various churches than about anything else that had happened in those various communities.

There was no story about Fred, or Jill, or Michael, or Jennifer, or anyone else. It was about the 168 and the 289 and the 374 and the 703 — there’s the high point again — and down to the 414. There was no reference to Carla standing by him in all those years in ministry, or raising a daughter and two sons in those various churches.

And then Conrad stopped. He had been listening to his own story. And he realized that it sounded pathetic.

It wasn’t that all he cared about were the numbers; it’s that he was bitter about never again getting the adrenaline rush associated with being able to speak to a thousand people each weekend. About being bounced down to a smaller church. And then left to deteriorate in a useless administrative position in the district office.

Another resident raised a hand, this time one of the men.

“You left out a number;” he said; “22. There’s twenty-two of us here, twenty-four if you count yourself and the woman who can’t play the piano.” (Of course he had miscounted by one, but…)

“Well actually;” he said, trying to do some damage control, “I think she did those hymns really well, she just doesn’t know the ones that are in your book.”

“Well I grew up Salvation Army, so hey, Miss, do you know Thou Christ of Burning, Cleansing Flame?”

“I don’t think we know that–” he started to say, but the pianist suddenly lighted up and launched into a rather rousing introduction, uncovering previously hidden keyboard skills, and the man stood to his shaking feet and in a loud and clear voice sang verse after verse.

As it turned out the song had a hook, a line that repeated constantly and by the 4th verse, all the residents were singing. Singing loudly, “Send the fire, Send the fire, Send the fire.”

By now it was 2:40 and he was back on schedule.

He read the text for the message, a sermon from the files of the glory days at Central Church, slightly shortened to fit the 20-minute window. In his mind he was back there. Two services. A thousand people every weekend.

One of the two staff members held up a cardboard sign that said “One Minute Left.” He thanked everyone for coming and gave a short benediction.  The staff members started getting ready to pull wheelchairs out of rows and into the hallway.

“Wait a minute! Stop!” yelled the man who had introduced the last song into the service mix; “That number you forgot. We aren’t 703 members, but there’s twenty-two of us, and we’re the best damn twenty-two people you’ve got right now.”

Conrad looked deep into the man’s eyes, and then noticed the smile.

And then he smiled back.

And then time froze and the staff stopped moving wheelchairs and everyone waited for Conrad to say something in return, except he couldn’t think of anything. Nothing at all. So he said the first words that popped into his head.

“This isn’t the dining room.”

 

September 20, 2014

The Last Post

Filed under: blogging, writing — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 8:50 am

No, we’re not talking today about the bugle call known as “The Last Post,” although there is a similarity of theme.  Wikipedia reminds us about that song which originally connoted the end of day for soldiers and then crossed over into memorial usage: “In all these countries it has been incorporated into military funerals, where it is played as a final farewell, symbolizing the fact that the duty of the dead soldier is over and that he can rest in peace.”

Neither are we saying this is the last blog post here at Thinking Out Loud, though perhaps some of you were hoping!

Rather, what got me thinking was a Twitter post from Keith Brenton last night:

If I had just one social media post left in my life, to bring joy and wisdom and love to a sad, stupid, hateful world …this wouldn’t be it.

Okay. But what if you had one post left?  In the endless stream of social media history you’ve created on WordPress, on Facebook, on Twitter, on tumblr, on Instagram, on YouTube… and on everything else; what if you had One Final Post. Your own famous last words. The thing everyone would remember you by.

What would it be? 

Note: These words, phrases and sentences are already taken

  • Related: Two years ago I posted the lyrics to a song I wrote as a much younger person. I was basically asking the same question, “What will my life be remembered for?” It’s a fair question to ask yourself periodically.

September 16, 2014

“I’m Fine — Not”

Filed under: writing — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:49 am

Guest Post

Today I want to introduce you to Diane Lindstrom who blogs at Nice One Nana!  To read this at source, click the title below.


The Fog of a Broken Heart

Apparently, the two most common lies are “I’m fine” and “It’s OK.”

Casual conversation seems to trap us into a practiced script that alienates us from exposing the truth about who and how we really are.

It’s difficult to be honest with others because to do so, we need to believe that others care and that it will be safe to expose the restlessness in our spirits, without fear of rejection.

image 0916A young woman walked into the store last week and I greeted her with a friendly, “Hi – how ya’ doin’ today?”

She walked up to the counter, took my hand,  looked me straight in the eye and asked,“Do you REALLY want to know because if you genuinely care, I’ll tell you about the sh–ty day I’ve had so far.”  

It was quiet in the store — no customers around — and because I had engaged in conversations with this woman before, I decided to pursue the dialogue.

“I care, Susan. I care” was my response. I put down the pricing machine and postured myself in a way that said, “Talk to me. I’m listening.”

The young woman began to speak.

“So, here’s the story. My mouth says ‘I”m OK.’ My fingers text, ‘I’m fine’ but my heart says, ‘I’m broken.’ There’s a good chance I’m going to lose custody of my two kids because of my drinkin’ and my mother is giving up on me. I’m not fine. I’m not OK. I feel like I’m gonna’ die.”

With those words, the woman began to weep.

Oh, how humanity is groaning all around us. (Romans 8. 22,23)

The Holy Spirit breathed Jesus’ familiar words into my conscience.

For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in, I needed clothes and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit me . . . I tell you the truth, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers of mine, you did for me. ~ Matthew 25:35-36,40

I have learned that it’s a costly choice to care.

Consciously allowing our hearts to break goes against not only our natural tendencies, but also against the grain of our culture. Myriad distractions lure us from embracing pain. There are so many places to hide so that we need not heed God’s beckoning to share in the suffering of impoverished people.

But the pain and empathy I felt moved me to action.

A person is justified by what he does and not by faith alone. ~ James 2.24

I walked around the counter and held her in my arms. Thankfully, no other customers came into the store and I was resolved to be “all there” for this hurting woman. She didn’t need advise or exhortation. I couldn’t be the answer to her pain but I certainly could be “Jesus with skin on” for those precious minutes that she needed to be held.

The fog of a broken heart is a dark fog that slyly imprisons the soul.

If we can be a beacon of light that breaks through the fog, even for a short moment, it is good and honoring to God.

We now have this light shining in our hearts, but we ourselves are like fragile clay jars containing this great treasure. This makes it clear that our great power is from God, not from ourselves.    ~   2 Corinthians 4.7 NLT


Diane Lindstrom is a Canadian author who looks for Almighty God in the ordinariness of life. She has been blogging daily since 2010 and has recently published her first book, Sisters in the Son.  She thrives on bike rides, laughter and homemade chai tea with lots of froth.

August 18, 2014

From the Diary of Isaac Wotts, Church Janitor

Filed under: charity, Church, writing — Tags: , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:47 am

Isaac writes:

One of the things I hate is when someone comes up to me on Sunday morning and says, “There’s something in the men’s room you need to see.” I try to dress up a little for Sunday, but there’s a great deal of wisdom in actually attending a different church than the one which employs you, especially if you’re the church custodian. (But if you’re the pastor; then it doesn’t work out too well.)

Short StoriesIn the handicapped stall, someone had carried in a chair from an adjacent Sunday school room, propped it up underneath the ventilation grate and then apparently knocked the grate down, bending it somewhat.

“Would you like to know what happened here?” I asked the man who had located me. He nodded so I continued. “This happens every two years. A bunch of middle school boys are in here and hear the sound of the toilet flushing in the adjacent women’s restroom. They realize the rooms are not totally soundproof and then they recognize the voices of middle school girls they know talking loudly. They are determined to either hear more or see more and so they climb up here only to discover the vents point away from the floor and the whole exercise is pointless.”

I thanked him for letting me know about the problem, and then, since the chair was already in place, I climbed up to see if the grate could be fitted back on and when I determined it wasn’t too badly bent, I opted to go get a soft mallet so I could deal with it right away. Just before I climbed down, I discovered firsthand how clear the sound is when you are close to the ventilation system…

“…I don’t know how she manages with all those children.”

“I know, and she wears that same blue and white outfit to church week after week after week. Like, doesn’t she have anything else in her closet.”

“Well at least when those brats are acting up they don’t have to put her number on the screen; the ushers can always find her in that same white shirt and blue vest thing…”

At that moment someone came into the restroom and I thought it better to climb down lest I be accused of the very thing the middle school boys were up to.

About three minutes later I was back standing on the chair, ready to hammer the grate in place, and just as I was about to strike the first blow I realized there were different people in the rest room next door…

“Hi, Wendy how is it going?”

“Well, my brother Tom is being released from the hospital on Thursday, so then he says he’s ready to take the kids back over the next month; so we’re going to very slowly work our way down from six kids to just my three.”

“It must cost you a fortune to feed them.”

“Yeah, and they’ve all grown over the summer and need back-to-school clothes, and the hand-me-down thing doesn’t work because of the girl/boy distribution. I’ve got $75 to spend on all six of them. And that leaves me with nothing. I’ve got three changes of clothes to wear to work, and I don’t know how many times I’ve worn this one to church.”

“Why don’t you come by the thrift shop?”

“Oh I practically live there, Olivia; but not the one you work at, we go uptown because there’s free parking.”

“No, I want you to come to mine, downtown. I’ll use my manager key in the cash register and authorize the cashier to give you 50% off everything; I’ll explain it in the log somehow. Come next week, and park in the Jefferson Street lot, and bring the parking receipt into the store and I’ll get it authorized.”

“That would be awesome. I’m not gonna turn you down. I really appreciate…”

…And then they must have walked out the door.

Church CustodianI banged the ventilation grate into place, picked up the chair and emerged from the men’s room, noticing the two Grade Seven boys on the opposite hallway looking at me and laughing. Suspicions confirmed.

Inside the maintenance room, I replaced the mallet, and then grabbed a roll of masking tape from a nearby shelf. I reached in my wallet and pullet out a gift card from Sears that I knew had about $48 left on it. Not much, but still…

I placed two strips of tape on the card, and on the first I wrote, “$48 — Treat yourself;” and on the second “Use this for YOU.”

Wendy was easy to spot. She was wearing the aforementioned blue and white thing. “This is for you;” I said, “From someone who wishes to remain anonymous.”

She read it and said, “Oh I’ll bet this from Olivia.”

“No, I said;” It’s not from Olivia; when were you talking to her?”

“In the women’s room this morning.”

“No, Wendy, this totally predates that.”

I walked away. It predated it by about three minutes to be sure; it was part of the earlier conversation I overheard, so it wasn’t a lie, right?

 

 

 

August 10, 2014

Just Checking In…

When you post every day at a fairly fixed time, and then you take a day off, people do start to wonder… So first, a random graphic from my previously-unused files…

For the word of God is living

 

…followed by a joint-post with Christianity 201 which, ironically was titled “What to Write.”  (The ‘random’ graphic serves as reminder that what we do write is much more powerful when it is saturated with scripture content.)


This morning our speaker opened in prayer quoting Psalm 19:14

May these words of my mouth and this meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, LORD, my Rock and my Redeemer.

No pastor, teacher, preacher, author wants to overstep the boundaries of what would be acceptable to God. Many begin Sunday sermons with the prayer, “Hide me behind the cross;” expressing the desire that the cross of Christ be seen first and foremost, not the speaker.

A few days ago, blogger Scott Fillmer quoted from the introduction to The Journals of Jim Elliot.

What is written in these pages I supposed will someday be read by others than myself. For this reason I cannot hope to be absolutely honest in what is herein recorded, for the hypocrisy of this shamming heart will ever he putting on a front and dares not to have written what is actually found in its abysmal depths. Yet, I pray, Lord, that You will make these notations to be as nearly true to fact as is possible so that I may know my own heart and be able to definitely pray regarding my gross, though often unviewed, inconsistencies… these remarks are to be fresh, daily thoughts given from God in meditation on His word.

Elliot had no idea through his martyrdom how many people would want to read his writings. It reminds me of this story:

6While Jesus was in Bethany in the home of Simon the Leper, 7a woman came to him with an alabaster jar of very expensive perfume, which she poured on his head as he was reclining at the table.

8When the disciples saw this, they were indignant. “Why this waste?” they asked. 9“This perfume could have been sold at a high price and the money given to the poor.”

10Aware of this, Jesus said to them, “Why are you bothering this woman? She has done a beautiful thing to me. 11The poor you will always have with you,a but you will not always have me. 12When she poured this perfume on my body, she did it to prepare me for burial. 13Truly I tell you, wherever this gospel is preached throughout the world, what she has done will also be told, in memory of her.”

Verse 13, which I’ve underlined is interesting because the woman had no idea that what she was doing would continue to be remembered in perpetuity; but also the agency by which we know the passage that we call Matthew 26; the writer of the gospel could not possibly realize the means by which that story would become part of what we call the New Testament canon, which in turn is part of the bestselling book of all time, which we call The Bible. (Today, many print books are remaindered, declared ‘out of print’ after as little as one year.)

Pause for a moment: Imagine creating something that lives on long after you are gone; of leaving a story so significant that becomes part of the core literature for all generations that follow.

I try to both write God-honoring material here [at Christianity 201], and select God-pleasing material here on the days we borrow from other devotional bloggers and authors. But the totality of my computer output on any given day can contain a variety of topics not all of which are enduring or lasting. Just check Thinking Out Loud, and you get a glimpse of some of the controversies that dog the contemporary church, and each Wednesday at that blog we note some of the stranger things that take place in the name of Christianity. Many of these posts have a “best before” or what the Brits call “sell by” date that’s just a few hours after the post has been published. [That's why I created C201; I needed the personal balance.]

Elliot’s wish was that God would, “make these notations to be as nearly true to fact as is possible so that I may know my own heart and be able to definitely pray regarding my gross, though often unviewed, inconsistencies.” He desired to be truthful and he desired to be consistent. The gospel of Matthew strived for accuracy. The woman with the alabaster jar courageously broke with tradition as he broke the jar sacrificially, probably not fully realizing the prophetic significance of her actions.

Truth, consistency, accuracy, courage, sacrifice. This is what pleases and honors God.

July 15, 2014

Unfamiliarizing Familiar Texts

Filed under: prayer, writing — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:46 am

We ran these on the blog six years ago…

The Beatitude Creed

How about this for a novel creed:

I believe that the poor in spirit will inherit the kingdom of Heaven.
I believe there will be comfort for those who mourn.
I believe that being meek is a good thing and that those who give everything will inherit the earth.
I believe that those whose heart is set on seeking righteousness will find it.
I believe the merciful will receive more than they think they deserve.
I believe the pure in heart will be blessed and will see God.
I believe that those who long for peace and do more than others think is safe are children of the living God.
I believe in a place of safety for those who are hurt for trying to do the right thing.

I believe that being poor, and ignored and weak, and sick and tired and broken and messed up and kicked around is not as spiritually dangerous as being self-satisfied and clever and well-clothed and well-fed and degreed and creed-ed and important.

~posted July 17th, 2008 at A Life Reviewed blog – Joe and Heather live in Coventry in the English West Midlands


A different version of The Lord’s Prayer

The following is a version of what is commonly known as ‘The Lord’s Prayer.’ However this version is one translated from Aramaic, rather than Greek.

Oh Thou, from whom the breath of life comes,
who fills all realms of sound, light and vibration.
May Your light be experienced in my utmost holiest.
Your Heavenly Domain approaches.

Let Your will come true
in the universe
just as on earth.

Give us wisdom for our daily need,
detach the fetters of faults that bind us,
like we let go the guilt of others.

Let us not be lost in superficial things,
but let us be freed from that what keeps us off from our true purpose.

From You comes the all-working will,
the lively strength to act,
the song that beautifies all and renews itself from age to age.

Sealed in trust, faith and truth.
(I confirm with my entire being)

Some say that the Aramaic is the original, some say the Greek. I don’t know enough to say. The Lord’s Prayer does seem to have its origins in the Jewish Kaddish, a liturgical prayer developed in Babylonia and spoken in Aramaic.

I think it’s a beautiful version, whatever the logistics are.

~ from Kay at The Crowded Handbasket blog on July 25, 2008


Why The Poor In Spirit Are Blessed

Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven (Matt. 5:3)

Author and theologian Monika Hellwig gives us the following:

  1. The poor in spirit know they are in need and can’t help themselves.
  2. The poor in spirit know not only their dependence on God and on powerful people but also their interdependence with others.
  3. The poor in spirit rest their security not on things but on people.
  4. The poor in spirit have no exaggerated sense of their own importance and no exaggerated need of privacy.
  5. The poor in spirit are less interested in competition and more interested in cooperation.
  6. The poor in spirit instinctively appreciate family, love and relationships over things.
  7. The poor in spirit can wait, because they have learned patience.
  8. The fears of the poor in spirit are more realistic and exaggerate less, because they already know they can survive great suffering and want.
  9. When the poor in spirit have the gospel preached to them, it sounds like good news and not like a threatening or scolding.
  10. The poor in spirit can respond to the call of the gospel with a certain abandonment and uncomplicated totality because they have so little to lose and are ready for anything.

~found in files; original source unknown

June 22, 2014

Beating the Heat: I’m Getting Along Swimmingly

Embracing the Heat

It’s been 25 years now since we first moved to our present location from the big city. We are connected to two different small towns, just a few miles apart. One we sleep in. One we work in and attend church and it has the school our kids attended. Give me about three minutes I can name the location of every traffic light in both.

But we’ve never established any kind of relationship with anyone who has a swimming pool.

This isn’t a big problem; summer is fairly short here. But there’s something about a hot day that makes you long to be near a body of water, and the Great Lakes don’t really warm up until late July.

On a hot day, I can be heard asking, “How can we know so many people and not know anyone well that has a pool?”

Until last year.

One day, I simply went out on the back deck and decided that instead of fighting the heat I’m going to embrace it. Fortunately, I don’t sunburn easily. For 20 minutes I simply laid in the sun, and then I went inside for a drink of ice water. And then, I took the watering can, filled it to the brim, and went back outside and poured the water over my head.

Tap water here comes out very cold. Most people don’t do the keeping-a-pitcher-in-the-fridge thing because there’s no need. It felt good. It doesn’t cool the body down as much a swim might, but like the label says, you can always, “Rinse. Repeat.”

A swim in a pool is still attractive, but not as great a need. I thought of that yesterday morning while reading this quotation from G. K. Chesterton:

There are two ways to get enough. One is to accumulate more and more. The other is to desire less.

Statistically, most of the people reading this reside in the U.S., where the ‘long hot summer’ is a fact of life. “Hot town, summer in the city, back of my neck gettin’ dirty and gritty.” Maybe you’re wishing someone from the city would come by and open up the fire hydrant.  Perhaps you dream of winning a trip to a resort or beach town. Rob Bell told a story about taking a bunch of kids from Grand Rapids to Lake Michigan. Most had never seen the lake even though it was only an hour away and marveled how the body of water seemed to keep going without end.

Possibly the humidity and air quality are making it hard to breathe. Perhaps your property overlooks that of a neighbor who has a pool, and the inequity of it all — plus the fact they’ve never invited you over — just gets you angry.

Just embrace the heat (making sure to limit exposure and use sunscreen.)

Oh, and I just looked in your fridge and you’re out of milk. Head over to the grocery store and take a long, long time to make your purchase. Walk up and down every aisle. It’s not as cooling as a swim, but you might even run into someone else who’s working the same strategy. Maybe the two of you can spend fifteen minutes over a lemonade or a sundae comparing notes. You might even make a friend. Or make a difference.

 

June 17, 2014

When Outrage Becomes Fashionable

Last week Leadership Journal — the same organization that publishes my Wednesday Link List — stirred up a hornets’ nest when they published an article by a former youth pastor now serving time in prison for sexually abusing a girl in the youth group.

For people who have had to deal with any kind of sexual abuse, this article struck a lot nerves, but not in the way you might think. Rather, there was a groundswell of feeling that the language in the piece elevated the author beyond what he deserves, that it appeared to be prescriptive at a time the author should not be giving advice, and that it somewhat soft-pedaled what took place using words like affair or relationship when the legal system would clearly define it as rape.

To publish or not to publishThat Leadership Journal is a division of Christianity Today, Inc. only added to the controversy.

I became aware of this taking place on Twitter — where readers seized the hashtag #takedownthatpost — and followed it early on in real time since I now have more than a passing interest in what happens at LJ and CT. Later Tweets revealed that several Leadership Journal staffers were away at the time, but eventually a three-paragraph disclaimer was added to the beginning of the story, and then, about a day later, the six-page post was removed entirely with an apology.

I think, at that point, removing the article was the only sensible thing to do.

Rather, what concerns me is something I felt while all this was going on, namely that being outraged by this particular article became a Twitter trend. People, some of whom I am quite sure have never paid LJ any attention prior to this, simply joined the bandwagon because that was the correct thing to do.Again, I don’t want to minimize the seriousness of the subject the article discussed. I merely want to make an observation here that for a few days last week, moral outrage became fashionable.

protest signSocial media has the potential to raise issues that are important, but when objection to a particular piece becomes trendy, I have to wonder if the outrage stems from deeply held convictions or if the the publication that is the subject of the outrage is simply being bullied into trashing the piece. As a regular reader of the weekly column by the Public Editor of Canada’s largest newspaper, I know that “You should never have published that article,” is an oft-heard refrain.

The article had it its issues. But as I pointed out in another blog post last week, the rule caveat lector always applies: “Let the reader beware;” or more literally, “be wary.” The author wrote what he felt about the whole issue, and yes, perhaps he is in denial about some aspects of what he did. Then again, maybe he simply wanted to write something that presented himself well.

The other question is one of the appropriateness of the forum the author was given. No doubt some felt that anything in the CT family simply gave the article too much profile; but the outrage that followed would only add to the website traffic.

[][][][][][][]

So…we have guest posts here sometimes. Would I have printed the article?

I think I would have been attracted by the idea that a convicted felon — incarcerated for something he did while on staff of a local church — would want to use my blog to tell his story. The inside nature of the story, or the exclusive release of the story would probably temper my desire to do some careful editing; and communication for the purpose of making changes might have been difficult.

Faced with objection and outrage, I might at first dig in my heels; and then I probably would start thinking about damage control after several days; basically exactly what CT did.

The situation would only complicate if I were working with a skeleton staff during summer holidays.

[][][][][][][]

The writer wanted to do something that would be redemptive for other student pastors who are vulnerable to temptation.

Instead we ended up with something that was prescriptive for editors faced with the temptation to run a story which perhaps should have stayed in the closet.

 

 

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