Thinking Out Loud

August 23, 2014

There’s a Place That’s Called Heaven, Don’t You Ever Forget

Filed under: music — Tags: , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:24 am

We continue our weekend with the oldies.

In the late 1960s, in a pre-CCM environment, songs expressing some type of spiritual sentiment were usually a surprise. The closing song on Freedom Suite in 1969 by The Rascals (aka The Young Rascals) was such a song. This was the same band that recorded People Got to be Free, which could be described lyrically as inspirational with a hint of gospel. So this song, Heaven, wasn’t alone in their repertoire.

Sometimes, baby, when you’re really down
There just don’t seem to be a ray of hope around
And everybody that you meet kind of wears a frown
It’s cold and lonely in the heart of town
Got to tell you all that

There’s a place that’s called heaven
Don’t you ever forget
Now, once I heard about heaven, yeah
I’m gonna get there yet

Some days you laugh and some days you cry
Sometimes it feels like the world has passed you right by
But everybody’s got to find a peaceful place to hide
If you’re out looking, take a look inside
And I think you’ll find that

There’s a place that’s called heaven
You might think that’s kind of square, oh oh yeah
If you don’t believe in heaven, yeah
You ain’t never been there

They’ll try to bring you down to their way of thinking, yeah
But don’t you do it, no no, don’t you let it get by (don’t let it by)
A little voice inside will tell you
Exactly what you’re gonna do
Don’t be a fool
Ooh yeah

You don’t have to go looking near or far
‘Cause you can find happiness standing right where you are
Just open up the windows that are in your heart
And let the light shine, then your life will start
Please believe it that

There’s a place that’s called heaven
It’s filled with joy and peace, whoa oh yeah
And once you get a look at heaven, yeah
You’ll find the love that you seek
When all the world is falling down
You’ll find a world filled with peace and love and joy
For every girl and boy
And all your troubles will cease

You know, somebody said to keep on pushing
‘Cause there’s a change that’s got to come
She said, “Thank the Lord”
And every day I thank you, Lord
For all the stars and all the seas
And all the birds and all the bees

August 22, 2014

Who Will Answer? Relevant Today as it was in 1967

Filed under: music — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:56 am

This is a really quirky song you don’t hear on your local radio station’s ‘oldies weekend.’ Here are some details from Wikipedia:

  • released as a single in November 1967, is the title track of the 1968 album Who Will Answer? by the adult contemporary singer Ed Ames
  • originally written as the Spanish song “Aleluya No. 1″ by the Philippines-born Spanish singer-songwriter, poet and painter Luis Eduardo Aute, it was adapted into an English-language version with new lyrics
  • It was Ames’ fourth charting single that year, following “My Cup Runneth Over” [and 2 others]
  • Billboard magazine, naming the song its “Record of the Week”, praised the topical lyrics and the unusual musical combination of “Gregorian-like chant … Johann Sebastian Bach and … hard rock”, saying the song “expresses the urgent feelings of our times and deals with such meaningful subjects as nuclear war, apathy, religious discontent and the underlying confusion of today’s generation.”

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!, Hallelujah!

From the canyons of the mind,
We wander on and stumble blindly
Through the often-tangled maze
Of starless nights and sunless days,
While asking for some kind of clue
Or road to lead us to the truth,
But who will answer?

Side by side two people stand,
Together vowing, hand-in-hand
That love’s imbedded in their hearts,
But soon an empty feeling starts
To overwhelm their hollow lives,
And when they seek the hows and whys,
Who will answer?

On a strange and distant hill,
A young man’s lying very still.
His arms will never hold his child,
Because a bullet running wild
Has struck him down. And now we cry,
“Dear God, Oh, why, oh, why?”
But who will answer?

High upon a lonely ledge,
a figure teeters near the edge,
And jeering crowds collect below
To egg him on with, “Go, man, go!”
But who will ask what led him
To his private day of doom,
And who will answer?

If the soul is darkened
By a fear it cannot name,
If the mind is baffled
When the rules don’t fit the game,
Who will answer? Who will answer? Who will answer?
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!, Hallelujah!

In the rooms of dark and shades,
The scent of sandalwood pervades.
The colored thoughts in muddled heads
Reclining in the rumpled beds
Of unmade dreams that can’t come true,
And when we ask what we should do,
Who… Who will answer?

‘Neath the spreading mushroom tree,
The world revolves in apathy
As overhead, a row of specks
Roars on, drowned out by discotheques,
And if a secret button’s pressed
Because one man has been outguessed,
Who will answer?

Is our hope in walnut shells
Worn ’round the neck with temple bells,
Or deep within some cloistered walls
Where hooded figures pray in halls?
Or crumbled books on dusty shelves,
Or in our stars, or in ourselves,
Who will answer?

If the soul is darkened
By a fear it cannot name,
If the mind is baffled
When the rules don’t fit the game,
Who will answer? Who will answer? Who will answer?
Hallelujah! Hallelujah!, Hallelujah!

July 25, 2014

When Heroes Lose Their Honor

larry norman bw
I do not believe I would be in the place I am today spiritually were it not for the great influence of Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) and the role I got to play in helping introduce the genre to a nation that was hesitant to accept it.  The people I met, the songs and scriptures they were based on, the communities, the whole movement of it all; each of these contributed to my spiritual nurture in ways for which I will be forever grateful.

In general, Larry Norman is considered to have started the thing — referred to as the “father of Jesus music” or even “grandfather of CCM” — but it would be more accurate to say that he popularized it rather than birthed it.1 Larry passed away in 2008.

fallen-allenWhile I was aware that Fallen Angel, a documentary had been produced showing a darker side of Larry Norman there is a difference between knowing about a film and actually seeing it. Imagine! A popular Christian figure having personal issues. That had never happened before.

I think that too often we want to see the good in people and so we miss the clues that things might be wrong. One of Larry’s songs was Baby Out of Wedlock and it was so easy to see this as a piece of poetry, not a personal confession. That very I Corinthians 13 of us.

As it turns out, I still haven’t seen Fallen Angel, but last week we discovered 28 sections of it have been posted on YouTube; some of them have been there quite awhile. The user’s channel is Corrine M. and the documentary excerpts include a number of names I was aware of back in the day, promoters, managers, record company execs, past wives or girlfriends, and Randy Stonehill. Some of these I met through helping three different concert promoters bring Larry, Randy and Tom Howard to Canada, while others I met on a half-dozen extended holidays in Southern California. Collectively, they paint a rather sad picture of a person I could have easily hero-worshiped.

For his part, Stonehill is rather charitable, considering everything. He simply points out the disconnect between the person who led him to Christ and the personality idiosyncrasies about that person that later surfaced. The whole story is so very sad.

Growing up, my father was part of a music team that was associated with a popular Canadian evangelist and pastor who later lost his faith. Charles Templeton’s move from the Christian limelight to bewildered agnosticism is chronicled in many places, including the opening chapter of Lee Stroebel’s The Case for Faith.

One of the takeaways from my childhood that my father made sure I didn’t miss is that you can’t look to people to sustain your faith. They will inevitably let you down. Or take you down. We must instead look to Christ and Christ alone. He is the rock that never rolls.

larry norman in another land 25th frontElsewhere here at Thinking Out Loud:

1Supporting the idea that the roots of Jesus Music were much broader than what might be traced to a single “alpha person” is the YouTube channel Favorite Jesus Music. Scroll down to reveal some of the oldest posted songs. There is another YT channel like this as well; if someone recalls it I will add the link here.

July 19, 2014

When We All Get To Heaven

Rapture art

If someone were to ask me if there are any paradigm shifts I’ve noticed in Christian perspectives on various issues, I would have to say that among my peers and those with whom I converse online, three things might quickly spring to mind:

  • A rethinking of the afterlife as ‘New Earth,’ rather than a ‘heaven’ that’s up there as opposed to down here. (For this, see the book Heaven by Randy Alcorn.)
  • A reconsideration of the ‘rapture theology’ that has dominated Evangelicalism for the past several decades. (See End Time Delusions by Steve Wohlberg.)
  • A reassuming of our social justice responsibilities as opposed to placing the weight of our emphasis on doctrinal proclamation. (See Pursuing Justice by Ken Wytsma.)

However, the songs that we sing in our churches today — and by ‘our’ I mean those of us who have moved toward modern worship as opposed to gospel and classical hymns — do not reflect this change in thinking.

The hymns and gospel songs were consistent with things being preached in the pulpit and for many of us, these doctrines were ingrained through exposure to the music. Consider:

Some bright morning when this life is over
I’ll fly away

That’s rapture theology pure and simple. When We All Get to Heaven does talk about seeing Jesus and being in His presence, but implies that we are going to get to heaven, some place that’s out there.  Onward Christian Soldiers talks about taking the cross to the world, but our crusade doesn’t appear to include demonstrating compassion or there being servant leaders among the soldiers.

I’m not opposed to those songs entirely; they shaped who I am today. It’s just that in today’s vertical worship environment, we don’t have songs that tell our story and describe more of the thinking that is currently being taught in our churches.  Let me conclude with an illustration.

Last weekend we visited the anchor store in a large chain of musical instrument dealerships. I was telling the manager how my son, recently graduated in electrical engineering, has an interest in designing mixers, keyboards and especially synthesizers. I asked him if the store, when it hires people, is looking for product specialists or people who are good at sales.

He said basically that the product knowledge is a given. Nobody is going to apply who isn’t already a customer and very familiar with what’s in the store. So it’s the sales aptitude that they look for and develop in their staff.

Similarly, if I were asked to speak at a Christian songwriting conference, I wouldn’t talk about the basics of musical composition, I would, like the store manager, take that as a given. Instead, it’s a knowledge of the the lyrical foundation in the writing process that I would want to cultivate. I would want to encourage young Christian musicians to craft pieces that express where the church is today, the things that are central to us in 2014-15, and the things for which presently no songs exist.


We found today’s graphic image along with a very thorough article at this website

For an entirely unique view on this, here’s an old post I wrote about how a particular sect expresses their story in song.

July 18, 2014

Equal Time for Modern Worship

Filed under: music — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:21 am

A few days ago I ran a string of videos that left some with the impression that, in terms of Christian music, I am stuck in 1977.  So here, unedited, are recent things that have been playing on my computer.

Here’s the new Steve Fee that Andy Stanley says you should download

With the present modern worship trends, vertical worship means we’ve lost songs of testimony, or songs like this one which make a declaration of faith

If you haven’t heard this Chris Tomlin song before, that’s because it’s a single; the album will be out later in the year.

This one goes back a few years, but my local Christian radio station played it yesterday and it was new to me. Songs which use scripture always have a lyrical power behind them that some other songs lack. Again, a declaration, “My heart is where my treasure lies.”

I think the idea to put this together came while I was discovering Worship Mob last night. They do a lot of covers, this one is original. Check out their video channel.

This one is current, but does echo a lot of Andrae Crouch and the Disciples stuff from a bygone era:

Okay, I want to end with something a little quieter. So for this we do go back a few decades:

July 13, 2014

In My Mind There Rings a Familiar Tune

Filed under: music — Tags: , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 1:43 pm

While we’re breaking our one-year rule here — though it has been ten months — I don’t have a blog post today and this is really deserving of a greater audience! If you’re not on high-speed internet, don’t fret; this is audio-only:

Annotation on YouTube:

Christian parody of the iconic Beatles classic, Yellow Submarine.

Aaron Wilkinson, son of long-time friend and Christian blogger Paul Wilkinson came up with the concept of adapting Etlon M. Ross’s popular hymn “I Have A Song That Jesus Gave Me” (better known as, “In My Heart There Rings a Melody”) to the famous Beatles song that also became a classic cartoon featuring the Fab Four.

Enjoy and feel free to use in your congregations! They might really dig it.

Ever yours,
Flagrant Regard

Friend us on Facebook!
http://www.facebook.com/flagrant.regard

And if you haven’t already, check out FRs Reimagine video

July 10, 2014

Creating A Worship Song Set

Filed under: music, worship — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:10 am

Worship moment

Although our friend Laura has been leading worship for a relatively short time, she comes to this from a background in choral music in a more liturgical setting, so many of the modern worship songs and gospel hymns that are familiar to Evangelicals have been to new to her. With that perspective, her approach to leading in our home church is always marked by a careful choosing of songs, crafting original readings, and a most-evident continuity of theme.

She was asked recently to write about the song selection process — the always challenging and even mysterious part of worship leading to those who have never done it — and we got her permission to use this here at Thinking Out Loud. I really appreciated how she was able to cut to the core issues; the things that matter. I hope you’ll copy the link for this and send it to anyone who chooses the music for any sized event at your church.

Planning A Worship Set

by Laura Steen

In scripture, we are instructed to teach “using psalms, hymns and songs from the spirit, and to sing with gratitude in our hearts” (Colossians 3:16). How, then, do we plan a worship set that will set the spirit free, and make hearts thankful and ready to receive God’s word? How do we become organized, yet flow in the spirit? How do we work within the tension of careful preparation and spontaneity?

Prayer – the most important planning element. We enter into prayer as we think about the needs within the congregation and songs that may speak to those needs. We ask ourselves … is there a theme we need to work with, is there something in the message that needs to be reinforced through the music, do people just need to know God’s heart? It is amazing where answers come from … other people, scripture, books we are reading, or messages we have heard. We pray for preparation in our own hearts so that we can enter into worship and connect the hearts of God’s people with Him.

Song Selection – easier said than done. There are so many songs to choose from! Once prayer has given us a clear focus for the set, this process unfolds. We keep in mind several other items; are the words meaningful and scripturally based, are they right for the voices and instruments we have to work with, do they move us from praise to worship of our God?

Transitions – important smaller details. These create a natural flow through the worship set, often assisting in freeing the spirit. Scriptures, prayers, readings, heartfelt words or images are used to offer encouragement. Sometimes, a planned pause can speak volumes! Images, too, can speak a thousand words.

Practice – it isn’t about perfection, but rather to prepare the leader and team to work together and to create an arrangement that works for the songs. It isn’t just about technicalities, it’s a process that frees us to discover what works best for the song – voices, harmonies, instruments. Practice roots us in the purpose of our leadership and prepares us for the unexpected. We want people to feel freed to worship as the spirit moves them.<

And finally, Gratitude – we are grateful to be able to be used by God for the purpose of preparing hearts, freeing the spirit and encouraging others … and, while the planning takes time, there is so much joy in making music for God and his people!

 

June 24, 2014

Radio is No Longer About the Music

When I was in the 6th grade, I had pretty well solidified my career goal: To work in the television industry. Not in front of the camera, or even operating a camera, but in the control room or behind the scenes. Later on, this objective widened to include radio; an industry where you were both host and producer of what people heard. I’ve been told many times I have a great face for radio.

I realize that in 2014 radio is not the primary delivery method by which people are exposed to new music. There is always someone who has heard of a new music channel available for phone or laptop. But I miss those old days, and I especially miss listening to the announcers talk — what was called patter — between songs. I still go on YouTube and look up airchecks some of the original rock stations that were part of my growing up, WLS-Chicago, WNBC-New York, WOWO-Fort Wayne, WLW-Charlotte, CKLW-Detroit/Windsor, WKBW-Buffalo, WCFL-Chicago, WABC-New York, WXYZ-Detroit and some of the stations in Miami and greater Los Angeles I got to know later on.

radio-towerI love listening to the DJs talk. The cadence, the rhythm, the emphasis, the seemingly endless passion. “Be the sixth caller when you hear the secret sound and you win one-hundred dollars.” My goodness. A hundred bucks. Just for calling in. (Later, I would be such a lucky caller, and won a small sailboat, but that’s another story.)

Back then, the deejays talked about the songs. The singers. The album the song was from. The studio it was recorded in. The fact they were touring and doing shows in Dayton and Cincinnati and Lansing and Bowling Green, Kentucky. I got out the atlas to find those cities. There was a song about Bowling Green and I loved the name and wanted to go there. My friends said I was a walking encyclopedia when it came to music, and much of what I knew, I knew from listening to the guys — and it was always guys back then — on the radio. Some announcers picked all their own music, too — it was the days before everything was formatted in a highrise in Nashville — and it helped that they had a love for what they were playing.

What sparked all these memories was something that happened a few days ago as we were driving home and had the radio on in the car. I realized that the DJ wasn’t talking about the albums, the songs, the music at all. One singer just got married. Another was divorcing. Two of the guys in this band were gay. Two of the girls in that band were living with two actors who were starring in a current film. Another singer is suing his neighbor. Yet another is involved in a custody suit with his ex-partner for custody of their child.

I recognize that people want their radio announcers to seem close to the stars; they want to feel that the guy playing the music is just two or three degrees of separation away from the artists he or she is playing; or that they actually met backstage at a concert or at an in-studio appearance at the station. People want to think they have a sense of intimacy to their music heroes, and today opportunities exist whereby you can, in fact, send a note to a celebrity and get an actual, personal reply. Not often but it happens.

As we kept driving, I tried to find some common interest in all the marriages and breakups and shacking up, but failed to see how this was anymore relevant to the music than the relationship status of the guy who had just changed the oil on the car, or the woman who had rung in our groceries. Just as sure as water seeks its lowest level, radio had succumbed and now could only reflect the shallowness of the broader culture. Studios? Songwriters? You’d have to read the credits, but they are buried in one-point type in the booklet that comes with the CD, if you ever actually see a physical disc for that artist at all.

Decades ago Time Magazine did a piece when “rock ‘n roll” was emerging and observed that while outwardly this was music that highlighted drums and guitars, it was more than that; it was about the clothing and the hairstyles and the attitudes. Rock culture was born. Teens put pictures of their idols on their bedroom walls. I realize that is a fact of life where music is concerned, but it strikes me that today’s kids are missing out if they listen to radio at all, or whatever is the modern equivalent for the distribution of information about the songs and the artists. It’s all about who is having sex with who.

In my younger days, I would watch Entertainment Tonight. The show was all about the movie, TV, music and publishing industries. They showed how the stunts happen, how the songs get recorded, how the contestants get on the game shows. Today, ET has morphed into a celebrity gossip show and spawned a host of imitators. Talent has been replaced by looking good.

Some parents point their kids toward Christian radio as an alternative. It’s supposed to be safe. But even there, many times the DJ patter is borrowed from Facebook and gets preoccupied with the relationships between the band members, or the number of awards that singer has received, or the fact she gets her clothing from the same designer who does more famous people. How about, “This song is based on a phrase that occurs in Psalms;” or “This group takes there name from a verse in Jeremiah;” or “This song is about a woman who was a faith hero from back in the middle ages.” Maybe those songs don’t exist anymore, either.

I have no conclusion here. Tag me under #lament. I just wish things were different both for Christian radio and the broader market, because last time I checked, radio is still out there, cars still come equipped with them, and satellite providers still include a cross-section of radio stations in their basic packages.

 

 

June 8, 2014

My Kind of Worship Music (and How I Heard About It)

Filed under: music, worship — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 8:12 am

I don’t actually follow every news story that is making the rounds. I pick and choose. So the tectonic activity taking place among the staff and elders of Mars Hill Seattle (i.e. Mark Driscoll’s home base) is on my radar, though I’m not tracking it closely.

Nonetheless, Warren Throckmorton had an article on Friday about the church losing a popular worship director, Zach Bolen.  I clicked the video clip of his band Citzens, and have to say that as a keyboard player, this type of sound is like water to a thirsty man. (Or maybe I just borrowed a similar metaphor from the song.)  Too much of American Christian music is guitar-based, Nashville-rooted and all sounds the same. Well, IMHO anyway.

There’s a great endorsement from the UK Christian music magazine Crossrhythms (which figures because the sound is more aligned with European Christian music):

Clearly Citizens have a bright future ahead of them. As Breathecast commented, “Musically, Citizens have created a patented type of indie rock that flutters with the electronic beat of Switchfoot, yet shimmers with the emotional intensity of Hillsong United. Above all, Bolen sings with a sense of honest gravitas; it is as if leading worship is more than just a day job. Rather, he sings with a deep-seated passion that can only come from a man who knows grace.”

Enjoy!

June 5, 2014

I See a Blood Moon Rising

Filed under: books, Humor, music — Tags: , , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:08 am

Four Blood MoonsBlood Moon RisingWith the popularity of the books Four Blood Moons by John Hagee, and Blood Moons Rising by Mark Hitchcock, it occurred to me that it takes very little lyrical adaptation to make the old Creedence Clearwater Revival song Bad Moon Rising fit.

With apologies to the original writer, John Fogerty:

 

I see the blood moon rising.
I see trouble on the way.
I see earthquakes and lightnin’.
I see those bad times today.

Don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

I hear hurricanes a blowing.
I know the end is coming soon.
I fear rivers over flowing.
I hear the voice of rage and ruin.

Well don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

Hope you got your things together.
Hope you are quite prepared to die.
Looks like we’re in for nasty weather.
One eye is taken for an eye.

Well don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

Don’t come around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

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