Thinking Out Loud

July 24, 2014

Evangelism for Non-Evangelists

Filed under: books, evangelism — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:57 am

I’m almost certain that if I lived in Hayward, Wisconsin, Mark O. Wilson would be my pastor. I thoroughly enjoyed his book Filled Up, Poured Out (reviewed here) and his newest, Purple Fish: A Heart for Sharing Jesus was a delight to read. Christian non-fiction (i.e. doctrinal) books are not expected to be this much fun.

Purple Fish - Mark O. WilsonHere’s the difference: Mark Wilson is not dealing in theoretical evangelism. He’s a practitioner, with anecdotal accounts of the principles he believes in bearing results. In fact, to be honest, this is more a book of very short (i.e. many are single paragraph) stories of life change taking place because ordinary people were willing to take risks.

Oh, no! How many opportunities might I have missed by not being more attuned to people all around me?

This is not an attempt to teach a rigid methodology. There aren’t 4 steps or 6 steps to memorize. If anything, results are often achieved by breaking the perceived rules of witnessing, the book is very anti-methodology. By arranging the book in a series of 33 very short chapters, readers can take hold of these ideas in bite-sized morsels.

It is said that in Evangelical circles, many people delay being baptized because they cringe at the idea of having to give a one minute testimony. And that’s just to their peers. How much more are some people terrified to share their faith with a stranger? This book provides the nudge they might need.

To repeat, this book is very accessible for the average churchgoer who is intimidated at the idea of making a public declaration of faith.

The title? Mark Wilson pastors in the Northwoods area of Wisconsin where fishing is ubiquitous. So fishing is a motif throughout the book, a metaphor (that Jesus used), and a means to make connection. And in a rapidly changing world, I much prefer the idea of evangelism as fishing than speaking of going on a crusade. (And yes, that makes this a good recommendation for men to read, even non-readers.)

But what about the purple fish? I won’t give away the spoiler; you’ll have to read the book! Suffice it to say that it reinforces the idea that lost souls really do matter to God.

Purple Fish is published in paperback at $14.99 US by Wesleyan Publishing House.  Read an excerpt here.

 

July 8, 2014

On My Bookshelf

bookcase - roseland greene blog

One of the blessings of this blog is that your faithful readership has led to increased generosity on the part of several Christian publishers.  Unfortunately, not every book gets reviewed, but I wanted to mention several to you.

Before we begin, you’ll notice many books for men in this list. Okay, there’s only four, but that’s significant. Men’s books don’t sell well in the Christian marketplace, so this emphasis is a bit of a surprise. Plus, all four are from HarperCollins Christian Publishing group. Hopefully the market can sustain all this activity happening at the same time.

The Hope Quotient – Ray Johnston (Thomas Nelson) — More than just a motivational or self-help book, this California pastor has packed this book with charts and graphics as well as supporting scripture references and comes at a time when many people feel hope is lacking. The HQ test allows readers to test their own Hope Quotient.

Rare Bird – Anna Whitson-Donaldson (Convergent) – The real life memoir of a mother whose 12-year old son was washed away in a nearby creek following a freak rainstorm. This book releases in September from Convergent. To get a taste of this, check out this post on her blog, The Bridge: One Terrible Night. Releases in September.

Small – Craig Gross (Nelson Books) – The founder of XXXChurch.com writes celebrating the ordinary and the insignificant. While the book is general in nature, Gross incorporates story from his rather unique ministry. This book is releasing in August, and unlike the others listed here, I’m already one-third of the way in, so we may end up doing a full review on this one. (Trivia: This is a must-gift book for anyone who serves their local church as a greeter!)

7 Ways to Be Her Hero – Doug Fields (W Publishing) – The author of the classic Purpose Driven Youth Ministry and teaching pastor for the last 22 years at Saddleback is back with seven steps men can take to improve their ability to be a husband. He’s already got my attention with Step #1: Don’t Say Everything You Think.  Oh, oh!

The Dude’s Guide to Manhood – Darrin Patrick (Nelson Books) – The chaplain of the St. Louis Cardinals names twelve different characteristics that can be developed in any man of various stages in life.

Be The Dad She Needs You To Be – Kevin Leman (Thomas Nelson) – One of the foremost experts on family dynamics, prolific author and speaker Leman really needs no introduction as he delves into the relationships between fathers and daughters. There is much practical advice here; fathers of girls might want to keep this book handy.

The Good Dad – Jim Daly (Zondervan) – The President of Focus on the Family comes into many of your homes via radio each and every day, though often while the Dad in the family is at work. (I’m betting at least 70% of Focus listeners are female). The book is somewhat autobiographical as Daly didn’t have the benefit of great role modeling.

Love Well – Jamie George (David C. Cook) – The subtitle is Living Life Unrehearsed and Unstuck and encourages the reader to move beyond the paralyzing effects of fear shame and hopelessness.  This book releases in August.

Losing Your Faith, Finding Your Soul – David Robert Anderson (Convergent) – This book is releasing through the “edgy” imprint of Waterbrook/Multnomah, so it is no surprise that it deals with going through that period of life when lifelong faith assumptions start to unravel and beliefs about God, faith and church are in flux. The Connecticut Episcopal pastor deals with times we experience a “shift in our spiritual foundation.”

Nobody Knows: The Harry T. Burleigh Story – Craig von Buseck (Baker) – That this book is in hardcover adds to the mystery here. The book is subtitled, The Forgotten Story of One of the Most Influential Figures in American Music. In this case, we’re talking about the original American music form, Negro Spirituals.

Crash the Chatterbox – Steven Furtick (Waterbrook) — After getting downright giddy about Furtick’s first two books on this blog, you would think I would have done anything to get my hands on an advance reader copy of his third book. But alas, I’ve allowed myself to become jaded by all the online attention being given to Furtick’s $1.75 million (U.S.) home. I may get to this book yet, or read it privately without doing a review. I guess I’m just too disappointed in how this author’s journey is playing out, and it’s unfortunate because I had high hopes.

June 23, 2014

Book Review: God is Near by Clark Bunch

“Reading about incarnate deity shouldn’t be a chore. This part of the story in particular should feel more like taking a child to a parade than loading the dishwasher.” ~Clark Bunch, God is Near, p. 65

What if I asked you to take several pages and give me overview of the Bible? What is it saying? How do the various stories fit together? Does any of this matter to me?

Being part of the Christian blogosphere has allowed me to interact with some of the greatest people on the planet, but there are some writers in particular who I feel are a kindred spirit. One of those is Clark Bunch who blogs at The Master’s Table, and I was honored when he asked me if I would be one of a select group to review his book, God Is Near: His Promise To His People (Outskirts Press).

God is Near - Clark BunchClark has taken on the unenviable task of blending two objectives into a single book, and keeping that book under 100 pages: To show the immanence (nearness) of God in relationship to His people, and provide an overview of the wider arc of the Bible’s big story.

The result is a concise, informal Bible summary that offers great giveaway potential to that person in your circle of friends who has started asking questions about your faith; but also offers a few insights for those of us who have been in church from infancy.

Eight of the ten chapters concentrate on the Old Testament underpinnings of our faith, but show the foreshadowing of the promise to come. With an almost poetic cadence, each chapter affirms the immanence of God, but without sacrificing the transcendence.

Some of the best portions of the book are where Clark breaks from the narrative to offer some personal glimpses as well as his own insights into the texts. I particularly liked the comparison of the Passover to Christ himself, or the relationship between heaven as depicted in Isaiah and as described in Revelation.

From my perspective, God is Near is a great appetizer. It sets up the reader to want to learn more; to ask more questions.

God is Near is available on ebook in a Kindle edition; or your local bookstore can order it in print from Ingram. You can follow Clark Bunch’s blog (link above) or keep up with book buying opportunities on @Godisnearbook on Twitter, or at this page at Outskirts Press.


Read an excerpt from God is Near that appeared at Christianity 201.


 

 For my Canadian readers, buying the print version of God is Near may be a challenge. A similar project both in purpose and page length, by a Canadian author was reviewed here a few weeks ago.  Read about God Enters Stage Left by Tim Day.

 

June 13, 2014

Southern Baptists Condemn All “Heaven” Books

Heaven is for Real books

If you haven’t heard, this week’s Southern Baptist Convention convention (redundancy intended) included a resolution that basically said, ‘To hell with heaven books.’ Blogger Kristine McGuire summarizes the story accurately in this introduction,

There is an article on Charisma News which is reporting that the Southern Baptist convention has issued a resolution stating books (and now presumably movies) such as Heaven is for Real and others like it (such as My Journey to Heaven by Marvin Besteman, To Heaven and Back by Dr. Mary Neal, and 90 Minutes in Heaven by Don Piper) are not in line with “the sufficiency of Scripture regarding the afterlife” and are determining to remove Heaven is for Real from Lifeway Christian Stores.

And it’s taken them how many years to come to this decision? Heaven is for Real has been in stores since 2010…

continue reading here

Christian Retailing reported the same story:

…The parent body of LifeWay Christian Stores stopped short of calling for such products to be pulled from the retail chain, however.

Delegates—known as messengers—to the Baptist body’s assembly focused on “the sufficiency of Scripture regarding the afterlife,” cautioning against putting books about personal heaven experiences on the same level as the Bible’s description of the hereafter…

continue reading here

But certainly the rule here should be caveat lector, let the reader beware. By extension, isn’t any Christian book in danger of being elevated to the same status of the Bible? And doesn’t this already happen in certain circles, where the words of both Charismatic and Reformed superstars are given an almost divine authority.

Black Christian News reported:

In another cultural pushback, Baptists affirmed “the sufficiency of Scripture regarding the afterlife” and criticized best-selling movies and books that have focused on heaven and suggested descriptions of it.

“Many of these books and movies have sought to describe heaven from a subjective, experiential source, mainly via personal testimonies that cannot be corroborated,” they said.

In the same session where the resolution was passed, a messenger asked that Heaven Is for Real be removed “for theological reasons” from LifeWay Christian Stores, which are affiliated with the SBC. The request was ruled out of order.

continue reading here

J.D. Hall at the blog Pulpit and Pen notes:

What’s forgotten is that Burpo’s book (and Wallace’s movie by the same name, Heaven is for Real) is nothing new, novelty, or unique. Phil Johnson gives a good list of books with similar testimonies that have become so prominent in the evangelical marketplace that Tim Challies has come to call the genre “Heaven Tourism.” Johnson gives the list including My Journey to Heaven: What I Saw and How It Changed My Life, by Marvin J. Besteman; Flight to Heaven: A Plane Crash . . .A Lone Survivor . . .A Journey to Heaven—and Back, by Dale Black; To Heaven and Back: A Doctor’s Extraordinary Account of Her Death, Heaven, Angels, and Life Again: A True Story, by Mary Neal; 90 Minutes in Heaven: A True Story of Death and Life, by Don Piper; Nine Days In Heaven, by Dennis Prince; 23 Minutes In Hell: One Man’s Story About What He Saw, Heard, and Felt in that Place of Torment, by Bill Wiese.

continue reading here

Heaven is for RealHis article is titled “Heaven is for Real: Is Discernment Dead?” and makes the point that in the final analysis, “the details of the book ought to strictly and immediately raise the red flag of discernment for even the most elementary of Christians – let alone those serving as provost of Southern Baptist seminaries.” But he seems to disagree that giving so much stock to the child’s story as to render it worthy of condemnation is the wisest move. Good, personal discernment is all that’s needed.

Many articles noted that LifeWay did not actually end up having to remove the book from sales. There’s too much money to be lost, and LifeWay is a cash cow for the denomination. In various places here we’ve reported on instances where the company puts profit over principles, such as Southern Baptists’ wholesale condemnation of women in ministry, while at the same time publishing and promoting the ministry of Beth Moore. 

By falling just shy of condemning the book outright at LifeWay, the company leaves itself open to carrying the DVD, certain to be both popular and profitable. The film has earned $89,007,517 in the U.S. so far according to Box Office Mojo, and ranks 15th for 2014. The movie is scheduled to release on July 22nd from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment, with an initial MSRP of $30.99 for DVD and $40.99 for Blu-Ray.

Related:

June 5, 2014

I See a Blood Moon Rising

Filed under: books, Humor, music — Tags: , , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:08 am

Four Blood MoonsBlood Moon RisingWith the popularity of the books Four Blood Moons by John Hagee, and Blood Moons Rising by Mark Hitchcock, it occurred to me that it takes very little lyrical adaptation to make the old Creedence Clearwater Revival song Bad Moon Rising fit.

With apologies to the original writer, John Fogerty:

 

I see the blood moon rising.
I see trouble on the way.
I see earthquakes and lightnin’.
I see those bad times today.

Don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

I hear hurricanes a blowing.
I know the end is coming soon.
I fear rivers over flowing.
I hear the voice of rage and ruin.

Well don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

Hope you got your things together.
Hope you are quite prepared to die.
Looks like we’re in for nasty weather.
One eye is taken for an eye.

Well don’t go around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

Don’t come around tonight,
Well it’s bound to take your life,
There’s a blood moon on the rise.

June 2, 2014

Author’s Shack Simile Deserves a Fresh Look

The Gate - Dann StoutenIt was inevitable that in the wake of The Shack there would be imitators, and many are probably yet to come. Some of these will succeed and others will be pulped for recycling, but overall, I was surprised to see 2013’s The Gate by Dann Stouten (Revell) turning up at remainder prices earlier this year. This book deserves better, it deserves a second look.

Though I haven’t read the latter, I thought that the book might be well-described as The Shack meets The Five People You Meet in Heaven, but since I’m only qualified to note comparisons to the former, that is the best place to begin.

Like the popular Paul Young novel, Stouten’s novel involves a point of crisis that the author must redeem somehow, though in this case redemption rests on the shoulders of both of the two parties involved, and The Gate‘s “great sadness” is not quite as dark. The book also deals with our need for reconciliation and forgiveness. Both books use fiction as a means of teaching. The two titles have much to say about heaven. Also like Young’s bestseller, this one has great potential appeal to the male reader, accomplished here with the use of auto industry references that will especially resonate with collectors of vintage cars. Finally, like Shack, the book also allows the main character to have interaction with visible representations of all three parts of the triune Godhead; this book’s version of which would probably be less like to attract the controversy which dogged the bestseller.

The book is both peppered with and faithful to scripture, reflecting the author’s vocation as a Dutch Reformed pastor. There are some very teachable moments throughout, thought it was a scene with the main character reading bedtime stories to his daughters that I actually went back to re-read twice. Giving the character three daughters, along with interaction with female relatives throughout the story prevents this narrative from being male-dominated.

Again, I don’t know how this book did not receive wider publicity and marketing on its release, but I’m prepared to help remedy that here, and encourage you to track it down.

May 17, 2014

Previously Published As…

Rachel Held Evans Titles

In 2010 and 2011 on my book industry blog, I tried to keep up with all the books that get republished under different titles.  I thought I would be able to keep this up, but there are simply so many of them.  I was reminded of this recently with two different titles.

Tim Keller’s King’s Cross and Jesus the King are the same book. It’s somewhat obvious when you — after the fact — look at the covers, but not so much when you’re ordering out of a catalog or off an online list with no graphics.

And Rachel Held Evans’ Faith Revealed is a re-release of Evolving in Monkey Town with only very minor edits.

So why do publishers do this?  To get more mileage out of a title they feel performed under its potential. But it drives readers and booksellers nuts.  Here’s a look at some of the ones I tracked a few years ago and you are welcome to add others in the comments.

(Ignore the time references)

  • This one will hit hard next month: Karen Kingsbury’s Remember Tuesday Morning is actually a re-issue of Every Now And Then.
  • Donita K. Paul’s only dragon-less title The Vanishing Sculptor resurfaces as The Dragons of Chiril.
  • Andy Stanley’s Enemies of the Heart,  releasing this fall, was previously issued as It Came from Within.
  • Max Lucado’s One Incredible Savior is a new title for One Incredible Moment.
  • Evidence for the Historical Jesus by Bill Wilson and Josh McDowell is a relaunch of He Walked Among Us.
  • Beth Moore’s My Child, My Princess began life as A Parable of the King (missing from our previous list)
  • Another forthcoming one, The Power of Prayer to Change Your Marriage by Stormie Omartian is a repackaging of Praying Through The Deeper Issues of Marriage.
  • The Revell pocket book, Boys Will Be Joys is the same as the previous Stark Raving Dad. 
  • Another Revell pocket book, Elizabeth Elliott’s Finding Your Way Through Loneliness is a retitling of The Path of Loneliness.
  • Unlocking Your Family Patterns which includes John Townsend among the author list, is actually a remake of Secrets of Your Family Tree.
  • The Man Who Makes a Difference by Jim George is another round for the book God’s Man of Influence.
  • Andy Andrew’s The Heart Mender is another life for Island of Saints.
  • We just found out the ’09 title, Quiet Confidence for a Woman’s Heart by Elizabeth George is the same as Powerful Promises for Every Woman.
  • H. Norman Wright’s homage to cats, Nine Lives To Live is the new title for The Purrfect Companion.
  • Philip Yancey’s The Skeptic’s Guide to Faith is actually a reprint of Rumors of Another World
  • John Ortberg’s Know Doubt is a repackaging of Faith and Doubt
  • Donald Miller’s “newest” Father Fiction is a slightly revised edition of To Own A Dragon
  • John Eldredge’s Fathered by God is really a re-do of The Way of the Wild Heart
  • Dee Henderson’s Kidnapped is a repackage of True Courage
  • Liz Curtis Higgs’ Unveiling Mary Magdalene is the same as the still-requested Mad Mary
  • John and Paul Sandford’s Transforming the Inner Man is a kind of mash up of bits from Transformation of the Inner Man and Healing the Wounded Spirit
  • Max Lucado’s Cast of Characters is the book equivalent of a Greatest Hits album with a ‘tossed salad’ of excerpts from other titles
  • Lynn Austin’s God and Kings originally bore the series title, Chronicles of the King
  • Michelle McKinney Hammond’s How to Be Found by Mr. Right sounds like, but isn’t a sequel to Ending the Search for Mr. Right
  • Andy Andrews’ soon-to-be-released The Heart Mender was first published as Island of Saints
  • John McArthur’s A Simple Christianity was once titled First Love
  • Adrian Plass’ Silver Birches first appeared as Ghosts
  • Joseph Girzone’s Joshua and the Shepherd was formerly simply The Shepherd
  • Cloud and Townsend’s How to Have That Difficult Conversation You’ve Been Avoiding was published as Boundaries: Face to Face in a rather rare example of “un-branding” from a series.

Did we miss any?  Does this happen in the general market to the same degree?  Do you notice how some publishers are more represented here than others? Have you ever been stung with a duplicate copy you were unable to return?

May 13, 2014

On Reviewing Books

Filed under: books — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:54 am
No, not mine. I wish...

No, not mine. I wish…

One thing I’m really thankful for is that I came into blogging after years in Christian publishing. When I was offered review books, I didn’t just jump at the offer of something for free, but rather knew the titles, authors and themes I wanted to have in my library. I probably turn down more books than I accept.

There are bookshelves in our recreation room, bookshelves in our bedroom, bookshelves at the top of the stairs, and yes, bookshelves in our living room. It’s the living room collection that reflects the most recent or more often referred-to acquisitions. Some were sent for review. Some I picked up at remainder sales. A few I was willing to pay full price for.

At some point, the collection will need to be downsized. I’ve heard people, including pastors and Christian leaders, talk about going from 3,000 titles to 300. They speak of the angst of the process as though they were forced to give away their children. I totally get that. There will be titles my kids won’t want; and giving them away is going to hurt.

Each book has a story. I can tell you where or how I came to receive it. How it affected me. I can even quote sections of many of them even though no paragraphs are underlined and no page corners are turned down. I’m the same with worship songs. I can tell you where I was when I first heard a particular song.

I still work both in and around the publishing industry. The books I am involved with selling are not always the same ones I read. I can’t let my personal tastes dictate what might be a bad business decision; neither can I let the popularity of a Christian bestseller lead me to think that I am obligated to go beyond the first chapter.

At Christmas when everyone was home from college, I picked up a set of three books by a well-known Christian author that are now out of print. I said to the boys, “When the time comes and you’re setting up your own households, I really hope you fight over who gets these.” I think they just might do that.

Book Shop Talk Masthead

May 12, 2014

Yawning at Tigers: Holiness for a new Generation

Filed under: books, God — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 6:48 am

Simply knowing about God can never take the place of experiencing him. You could gather facts about God for the rest of your life and he could still be a virtual stranger to you. You can observe the flame, but never be warmed by the fire. ~p. 140

…a paradoxical truth about God’s holiness. It overwhelms, but it also draws. It terrifies and it captivates. It bows our heads even as it lifts our hearts. Ultimately, it results in joyful and reverent worship. ~p. 49

Yawning at TigersIf I started out the review by saying that Yawning at Tigers is a book about God’s holiness, I’d probably lose some of you. Surely every scripture verse on the holiness of God has been dissected and exegeted to death, right? I might have agreed before I read Drew Dyck’s book, but now into my second reading I am finding myself amazed again both by the ‘otherness’ of God and by how the larger Church constantly needs new authors to bring such truth home to us in fresh ways. Think Jerry Bridges meets Donald Miller. Or something like that.

Yawning at Tigers: You Can’t Tame God So Stop Trying has just the right mix of teaching, analogy and relevant stories from the author’s personal life. For a first time with a major publisher — okay, there was Generation Ex-Christian for Moody Press in 2010 — it hits all the right notes, but that’s to be expected from the Managing Editor of Leadership Journal, a periodical in the Christianity Today family of publications. Drew has also written widely in other media, which included interviewing yours truly years ago for the Canadian magazine, Faith Today. (No, I wasn’t the feature…)

What would happen if we were to find ourselves, as we will some day, standing before a holy God? A mix of terror and surprise, the latter because basically our God is too small. Like Job, we speak of things which we do not understand. Perhaps we should borrow some reverence from the people who spell God, G-d; and spell Lord, L-rd; as a reminder of utmost sacredness of even His name.  But, through all this he loves us.

Yawning at Tigers will get you thinking along these lines. The 224-page paperback (and also e-book) releases this week from Thomas Nelson, and I hope some of you will take the time to discover a new author. For more info, including an opportunity to read the first chapter free, go to YawningAtTigers.com.

Related:

 

May 4, 2014

Books Worth Reading…

Whenever we roll into a new month, I always look back on things published one year prior, to see if any of them deserve a re-look. This time around, I was struck by some books we were reviewing a year ago…


I don’t want to toss out cheap superlatives like, ‘Best book I ever read,’ but 24 hours after finishing Chasing Francis: A Pilgrim’s Tale by Ian Morgan Cron, I definitely feel that this is one of best written books I’ve ever read. With equal parts contemporary ecclesiology, church history, and Italy travelog, You can practically taste the Italian food. Chasing Francis is an excellent work of fiction that’s more about facts than fiction.

Chasing FrancisSome explanation is necessary. For me, this book fits in with the type of fiction that I’ve been attracted to over the past few years; what I call Socratic dialog. Think Paul Young in The Shack and Crossroads, Andy Andrews in The Noticer and other titles, David Gregory in the Perfect Stranger trilogy; books that use story as a motif for teaching.

But the publisher, Zondervan, didn’t see it that way, identifying the advance copy I received in the Christian Living category and avoiding the category thing entirely on their website….

[continue reading here]


Much as I hate to admit it, while I’ve been aware of him for many years, this week was the first time I finally got around to reading one of the more than fifty books by R. T. Kendall. The American born author and pastor is best known for being the pastor of London’s Westminster Chapel where he succeeded the likes of Glyn Owen, G. Campbell Morgan and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

R. T. Kendall - These are the Days of ElijahThe book I asked to review is These Are The Days of Elijah: How God Uses Ordinary People to Do Extraordinary Things (2013, Chosen Books) which was compiled from a series of Sunday evening sermons given at Westminster in 2000-2001; and if those Sunday night sermons were this good, I can only imagine what his preaching was like on Sunday mornings.

The book is an exposition of the story of the prophet Elijah. That said, you would expect the book to rest firmly in a Old Testament setting, but it’s as though Dr. Kendall can’t complete a paragraph without reference to a New Testament character or narrative… 

[continue reading here]


Cold Case ChristianityEvery decade or so a great work of apologetics appears which breaks the boundaries of the discipline and reaches a wider audience. Josh McDowell did it years ago with Evidence That Demands a Verdict; Frank Morrison with Who Moved the Stone? and more recently Lee Strobel brought a large audience to the discussion with The Case for Christ series.

Enter former Los Angeles County homicide investigator J. Warner Wallace and his book Cold Case Christianity: A Homicide Detective Investigates the Claims of the Gospels. (2013, David C. Cook). Like Strobel, Wallace was a skeptic turned believer, and like McDowell, Wallace leaves no stone unturned in his study of the reliability of scripture, from obscure passages to those central to core doctrine.

The book is divided into two parts, the nature of cold case investigation — and this case is 2,000 + years old, and the particular evidence that the Bible offers…

[continue reading here]

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