Thinking Out Loud

April 7, 2014

Top Canadian Christian Blogs

Filed under: blogging, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 7:07 am
In 1964, this was one of three finalists to become the new flag of Canada

In 1964, this was one of three finalists to become the new flag of Canada

With a nearly 75% U.S. readership, I tend to cloak my Canadian origins, but I thought today we’d celebrate a few people who also experience spell-check issues every time they use words like honour and colour. (After a year of fighting it, I converted this blog over to U.S. spellings.)  Ahead of time, apologies for anyone I left out:..

Top Ten

Ann Voskamp – A Holy Experience — From the moment you click through and the music starts playing on your speakers, you know you’re in a different place. Probably the greater appeal is to women, as is Ann’s bestselling book, One Thousand Gifts (Zondervan).

Tim Challies — The blog’s tag line is, “Informing the Reforming;” so you get the idea as to the target audience. I would tend to think at this point, Tim has become a prisoner of the blog’s success; it has got to have become a full time job. Still, the success is deserved and has spun off a book publishing company.

David Hayward – Naked Pastor — To say this blog is ‘edgy’ would be an understatement. David writes from Canada’s “east end” and is also a cartoonist who sells prints of his daily panels as well as larger pieces. Tag line: “Graffiti artist on the walls of religion.”

Jamie Arpin-Ricci – Missional — Urban church planter, IVP author (Cost of Community) and co-director of YWAM Winnipeg, Jamie is a few months shy of seven years of blogging. Tag line: “Conversations about Christ and Community.”

Bene D. & Rick Hiebert – Bene Diction Blogs On — Canada’s foremost investigative blog serves as watchdog, keeping an eye on Christian ministry organizations. I know somebody who knows who Bene is, but he’s definitely not talking.

Sarah Bessey — Representing Canada’s “west end;” through her connections with people like Nadia Bolz-Weber, Rachel Held-Evans and Jamie Wright, Sarah is rapidly gaining readers, not to mention her book Jesus Feminist (Howard Books).

Paul Wilkinson – Thinking Out Loud and Christianity 201 — Well thank you, don’t mind if I do…  Splitting up my daily writing into two very different platforms was both risky and a lot of hard work, but I’m honored (with no “u”) to be here.

Darryl Dash – DashHouse — The Toronto church planter writes articles of interest to other pastors and church leaders and is a featured writer at Christian Week, a Canadian Christian magazine. He wouldn’t mind me saying that his demographics skew Reformed.

Carey Nieuwhof – Carey is the lead pastor of Connexus, a dual-site church in the North Point Ministries family, basied in Barrie, Ontario which is about 45 minutes north of Toronto. His articles, mostly written to pastors and leaders often appear on other websites as well.

Kevin Rogers – Orphan Age — Kevin is a chaplain, musician, and pastor of a Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada church in Sarnia, Ontario; which is on the other side of the border from Port Huron, Michigan, north of Detroit. He writes devotionals, mostly and his blog was recently featured in the PAOC magazine, Pentecostal Testimony.

Worth Noting

Some writers don’t pull the same numbers but are worthy of being on this list and do have a national (and international) following.  

John Stackhouse – He’s best described on his Twitter feed: “Theologian, historian, ethicist, public scholar, preacher, musician and crime fighter.” A professor at Regent College in Vancouver, BC, John is well-known to academics, but appeals to a much wider readership.

Rick Apperson – Just a Thought — Rick and his wife live in Smithers, British Columbia, in the central part of the province east of Prince Rupert. A pastor and YWAM-er, he has been blogging faithful for years and manages to score some great interviews with top authors for his “Five Questions With” series.

Diane Lindstrom – Overflow — I mentioned Diane already here in our blog review on March 30th. She writes from a small town northeast of the Greater Toronto Area, is a great storyteller, embeds some great music videos, and hopes to have a book published soon.

Emily Wierenga — Emily writes from Alberta in western Canada, has two books on eating disorders and a third book coming this summer. She writes about marriage and family issues as well as adoption.

Bruxy Cavey – Bruxy — I don’t know of another pastor who is more active on social media and more accessible to his flock, which in this case involves nearly twenty sites in The Meeting House church family. Alas, his blog is more a hub connecting you to various videos and podcasts, but as I write this, he did write something resembling a blog post. 

Jeff Loach – Passionately His — Somehow Jeff got bumped from my radar lately, he should have been on our list of writers with substance a few weeks ago. (See link below.) A Presbyterian pastor in a town about 30 minutes northwest of Toronto, Jeff has been blogging since 2008, and has taught at Tyndale Seminary. 

Chris Vacher – Chris from Canada — Chris writes about all things related to worship leadership. You’ll have to forgive him if there’s been less activity on the blog lately, as his family recently relocated east of Toronto where he’s now directing music at C4 Church (Carruther’s Creek) in Ajax.

Sheila Wray Gregoire – To Love, Honor and Vacuum — With a syndicated newspaper column and books published with Kregel and Zondervan, Sheila is a popular speaker on the Girls Night Our events which tour across Canada. She lives in Eastern Ontario, and I have no idea why her blog doesn’t make the top traffic lists, as I suspect she does have many readers.

Writer Collective

Canadian Writers Who Are Christians — Online since 2007, this blog features new content almost every day, by people who are members of The Word Guild, a collective for Canadian Christian writers. 

Did I miss anyone? Feel free to leave a comment, or if you live in the land of the chosen frozen, mention your own blog.

Updated 9:25 AM, 11:25 AM, 5:00 PM

Related reading: Substance Consistently (Mar. 30/14) — A list of blogs I try to check more frequently out of the more than 600 I keep bookmarks for.

 

 

 

March 30, 2014

Substance Consistently

Filed under: blogging, links — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 10:45 am

Christian Blog Connection

Here are a few of my favorite go-to Christian websites/blogs when I’m looking for something solid to read, in no particular order. If my computer tech guy said I had to reduce the eight hundred or so bookmarks in my computer to a smaller list, these would be on it:

  • David Murray, Head Heart Hand — The author of Jesus on Every Page always has something I want to read.
  • Karl Vaters, New Small Church — A niche blog to be sure, but always interesting content regardless of your church size.
  • Michael Patton et al, Parchment and Pen — Always deep but never boring; I’ve been a reader since long before I started my own blog.
  • The late Michael Spencer, Chaplain Mike, Daniel Jepsen, Mike Bell, Internet Monk — Probably on your list, too; the conscience of the Christian blogosphere.
  • Greg Boyd, ReKnew — In the deep recesses of our car trunk are dozens of sermon download discs on the book of Luke from Woodland Hills church; we’re long-term fans.
  • Phil Vischer, Phil Vischer — Oh my! 95 Podcasts and I’ve never missed one. Maybe I need to get a life. The end of Western civilization as we know it.
  • Nadia Bolz-Weber, The Sarcastic Lutheran — As with Phil (above) I don’t think we’ve ever missed a sermon, but easier in this case, since they run 10-12 minutes.
  • Jamie Wright, The Very Worst Missionary — Jamie elevated mediocrity to an art form; she is definitely a work in progress and that’s what I love about the blog.
  • Russell D. Moore, Moore to the Point — Yes, I read Boyd, Bolz-Weber and Wright, but I also read “Dr. Moore” on faith and ethics, now also a weekly podcast.
  • Clark Bunch, The Master’s Table — I consider Clark an online friend and we’ve written posts for each other in the past.
  • Bene D. & Rick Hiebert — Bene Diction Blogs On — Another online friend, the blog is one of very few in Canada that engages in investigative writing. But who is Bene D.?
  • Diane Lindstrom, Overflow — This one has more of a women’s vibe, but Diane is another Canadian writer who writes consistently and writes well.
  • anonymous, Church Curmudgeon — The blog that doesn’t exist, but should. My favorite Twitter feed is both insightful and hilarious, all at the same time.
  • Stephen & Brooksyne Weber, Daily Encouragement — In a category all its own, my day usually begins with this devotional blog from the heart of Amish country.

That’s where I am at today. This list is radically different from what I would have written a year ago. I appreciate the different people who speak into my life. Apologies to those of you who aren’t listed here; some of you need to post more often. 

Update: Okay, I know, I forgot Scot McKnight at Jesus Creed.

Feel free to nominate your favorite in the comments!

March 9, 2014

The Possession of Ideas, Part 2

The corollary to yesterday’s discussion is that if I do choose to copyright my blog writing here, I am basically saying this is mineI wrote this, I created it, it was my talents and my gifts that went into creating it.

I’m glad the Biblical writers didn’t feel that way. If you believe in plenary inspiration — that God birthed ideas within them but they stylized it and added their individual touch to the writing — then even if you hold that “all Scripture is inspired” (which I do) you could still make a case that they could copyright the particular words used.

copyright 2But some would argue that even if you say, “This came entirely from God and I shouldn’t really take any credit for it;” if you want your writing to reach the greatest number of people, then you’ve got to put somebody’s name underneath the title.

That’s essentially the case with Jesus Calling. I don’t want to get into the larger debate on that book, because it’s been done elsewhere  (with 100+ comments) but if, like the classic God Calling, the “authors” feel that this book is the equivalent to Dictation Theory in Biblical inspiration, realistically, nobody’s name should appear on the cover. I wonder if “by Jesus” or “by God” would sell more or fewer copies than “by Sarah Young.”

You can however engage the commercial marketplace and at the same time take no money (or very little) for your wares. Keith Green is a name that some of the younger generation don’t know, but Keith basically said that if anyone couldn’t afford his records or cassettes, he would send them copies free of charge. It was radical at the time — and would be even more so today — and Keith took ribbing that perhaps he was also going to ship stereo systems to people who had nothing on which to play the music.

Keith GreenKeith Green would have loved blogging — he’d have about ten of them — and would be fighting hard for the open source blogosphere we talked about yesterday,  and also almost exactly two years ago. (The post then was triggered by an irate blogger at C201 as well, so we’re running one complaint every 700+ articles, which isn’t bad.) In fact, Keith would argue for open source thinking in a variety of Christian media and art.

Bottom line: We have to be careful about holding too tightly to the things of this world including possessions that are tangible and those which are intangible such as intellectual property.

March 8, 2014

The Possession of Ideas

The Bible has a lot to say about the accumulation of wealth and the hoarding of possessions. Probably the classic statement of scripture on the matter is,

NASB Matt. 6:19 “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. 20 But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves do not break in or steal…

or

MSG Matt. 6:19-21 “Don’t hoard treasure down here where it gets eaten by moths and corroded by rust or—worse!—stolen by burglars. Stockpile treasure in heaven, where it’s safe from moth and rust and burglars. It’s obvious, isn’t it? The place where your treasure is, is the place you will most want to be, and end up being.

The Bible doesn’t say, ‘Don’t have any treasure whatsoever.’ True, when Jesus sent his disciples out he told them to travel light, advice that extends through all of life:

NLT Matt. 10:9 “Don’t take any money in your money belts—no gold, silver, or even copper coins. 10 Don’t carry a traveler’s bag with a change of clothes and sandals or even a walking stick.

But in everyday life, the Bibles teaching presuppose you will have a home or a donkey or bread that you may or may not choose to give your neighbor when he comes knocking late at night.

CopyrightThis week it occurred to me that at the time the Bible was written, one thing that we can possess that they didn’t was intellectual property. There was no Copyright Act; no Letters Patent. Did Jesus’ earthly father, Joseph the Carpenter have a special way of doing a table that would cause him great consternation if Murray the Carpenter down the road started copying the idea? You get the feeling that everything was open source.

The whole premise of the sister blog to this one, Christianity 201, is that we search the internet for sources of daily Bible exposition and discussion. Unlike the Wednesday Link List, where some people click and some people just read the list, I think it’s important that these devotional meditations get seen in full, and statistics bear out the reality that most people don’t click through.

Most of the bloggers are thrilled that their work is being recognized. C201 doesn’t have quite the readership of Thinking Out Loud, but it possibly represents ten times as much as some of the writers see on their own pages. We get notes of appreciation, and a handful of readers also thank us regularly for putting them onto reading a particular writer.

So this week when, for the second time in about 1,450 posts someone strenuously objected to their material being reproduced in full — don’t look for it, it’s been removed — I started thinking about the whole intellectual property issue in the light of Jesus’ teachings.

I think it’s interesting that in the prior verse of Matthew 10, Jesus makes the often-quoted statement, “Freely you have received, now freely give.”

Personally, there’s nothing on this blog that isn’t up for grabs, provided it’s cited properly and quoted properly and being used non-commercially. Like this article? Help yourself.  Yes, I have been paid to write and could thereby consider myself a professional writer; but this is only a blog and it’s vital not to get too caught up in your own sense of self-importance; and I say that not out the spirit of someone who is loaded with wealth, but as a person who has had no specific fixed income for 19 years.

I also thought it was interesting that the person who was so upset about the use of his material on other than his own website was complaining about a particular article that was about 50% scripture quotations. More than 50%, I believe. Oh, the irony. I can just hear Jesus saying, ‘Uh, could you just link to my words in the Bible rather than print them out on your own website?’

That said, I am consciously aware that a double standard exists in the Christian blogosphere. We both permit and excuse the copying of text, but there is far less grace for poachers of cartoons and photographs. (I guess a picture really is worth a thousand words.) If you take what belongs to them, it’s like trying to wrestle a t-bone from a pit-bull.

In the early days of this blog, the weekly link list included cartoons from Baptist Press. Not any more. Baptists can be very litigious, which is too bad, because the cartoons were worthy of an audience beyond a single denomination. Everybody loses, but that’s the Baptist way, I guess.

Words are cheaper however. I respect intellectual property rights in general, but hey, guys, it’s only a blog.

I really think when the writer is a little older, they will look back and see the foolishness of trying to hang on to what really isn’t yours to begin with.

Think About It: Some things simply didn’t exist when the Bible was written, such as smoking cigarettes or driving over the speed limit. It’s the same with intellectual property. We have to appeal to the timeless, grand themes of scripture to make behavioral determinations.

There is a Part Two to this which appeared the next day.


Irony: The copyright symbol used today was already in my computer before I worried about such things…

March 2, 2014

I’m Writing This For Me

Filed under: blogging, writing — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 1:54 pm

One of the concerns I have about using the WordPress platform is that when an item here is complete, the button I click at the end says “publish.” This has a number of unfortunate nuances, not the least of which is that it makes me out to be a “publisher,” with illusions of grandeur that the world waits with baited breath for my latest tidbit of wisdom. Perhaps my readers even begin with a prayer, “For what we are about to receive, may the Lord make us truly thankful.”

weblogThe word “blog” is actually short for “weblog” and the “log” part is evocative of a “journal.” When, as happened here, the writing starts to attract a worldwide audience, it’s easy to be consumed with the statistics and think of yourself as a publisher who now has to meet a daily deadline.

When the blog is spiritual in nature, it’s easy to fall into the trap that says, “This is a major ministry I have built and now I must be faithful to it.” After all, God is depending this particular enterprise to reach the world; He has no other plan, no other servants.”

It’s so easy to be caught up in a false sense of your own self-importance.

We do this in churches as well. An old song may have talked about “You in your small corner, and I in mine;” but in our minds, our small corner starts to take on epic proportions. An entire city may be eternally doomed if we miss choir practice or don’t get the audio-visual equipment we need for the next Sunday School lesson. And don’t even talk to me about the possibility of doing the next worship set without a drummer. We must find a drummer. We will find a drummer.

The world will not stop if I miss a day; but I have, in fact, desired to remain faithful to this. But I don’t have to cover every breaking story, or comment on every Evangelical trend.

At the end of the day, this is a journal of my thoughts and opinions, and where my heart was at in March, 2014.  “Publish or perish?” That’s not the Biblical way. Better to pause, to rest, to be still, to meditate. 

 

February 24, 2014

Six Years of Thinking Out Loud: A Blogversary

TOL Banner Teal

Today Thinking Out Loud begins its seventh year.

Whoda thunk it? What does one say on such an auspicious occasion?

I guess today I’m struck by the contrast between this blog and most of the others I personally read, which are written by pastors and Christian authors. Is the difference here what brings in so many readers each month? I don’t really think so, but I think it’s important that other people have a voice at the online table. I also know that six years (plus a few reading others and writing an e-newsletter that predates this) of delving into the various issues that occupy space in the Christian blogosphere have been like a graduate school education in both theology itself, ecclesiology and the tension between Christianity and culture.

TOL blogversaryI have allowed myself to be shaped by the writers I read, but by also trained myself to unlearn some things some of them have said when, with the passage of time, their perspectives have become questioned. To paraphrase something my wife’s brother said on Twitter, ‘I’m not here because of what I have to say, rather because it gives me a reason to eavesdrop on so many interesting people.’

I’m also thankful that this summer, Thinking Out Loud gained a greater platform itself by becoming a weekly part of life at Leadership Journal, a division of Christianity Today. I still believe it’s a greater thing to make the news (in a good way, not the weird stories) than it is to simply write the news. But I don’t mind playing scribe if it means I get to choose some things I think are worth noting as part of each week’s passing scene.

So with all the writing that happens here, do I wish I was a published author? I think everyone has a book or two in them.  But not six. The Christian publishing establishment loves to take someone who has a hit title and make a brand out of it. But often the spinoffs are never as vital or passionate as the original. Still, I tried it once, the material is now dated, and I enjoy simply giving away content here each day as long as people come by even though this, combined with my equally non-remunerative vocation was recently calculated to represent a loss of income over the past 20 years in the neighborhood of $1,000,000.00

The phrase “Do Not Attempt” should be at the bottom of each page.

Do I wish I was a local church pastor? Not a senior pastor, though I often wonder about the church plant I did before starting this blog. What if it had been allowed a longer run than its 18-months existence; if a few more months might have made it into something more sustainable, or if a co-leader would have appeared on the horizon to boost the project and give me an occasional break?

As it stands, my local church participation is limited, as in non-existent. Am I a prophet without honor in my own community? That sounds noble. Maybe the supply of able-bodied people willing to serve outstrips the demand — at least for my gift set — so the opportunities go to the younger and better looking. (Think about it, when have you actually seen my picture here?) Heck, they don’t even hand me a plate and ask me to help take up the offering. I think the pastors here have banded together to create a no-fly zone where I’m not allowed to come within 20-feet of a live microphone; a sort of restraining order only I wasn’t served with my copy.  This would explain why all the pulpit supply requests I get are from out of town.

But again, to return to where I began, I think that living in that tension is what gives Thinking Out Loud its unique perspective. Most people who come here have never written a book or preached a sermon, or even served on a church board.

Pastors and Christian authors are great. I’m a fan of many of them, and of the process that gets them their platform. I do truly believe the cream rises to the top. But interacting with your Christian friends and your small group also provides an “iron sharpens iron” experience that can be equally enriching.

In that sense, I think the group of bloggers called “Mommy bloggers” have it right. These women — some, but not all of whom are also home-schoolers — share a ‘Christian life in the trenches’ experience each day that might be dismissed by the academics and Biblical scholars and religious ‘professionals,’ but feeds them daily with spiritual nutrition enriched by everyday life and the lessons that our children and extended families teach us.

So with that in mind, for year seven, I thought I’d devote this space exclusively to recipes and laundry tips. What do you think?

Paul Wilkinson Blogversary


Okay, so that was more personal this year, if you want to know my blog values, there’s this post from last year’s birthday, where you’ll also find I had the energy to write a double post that day.

Graphic: The banners that never were; these are actually from other blogs with the not-so-original name!  (We could have added this one, but you don’t steal images from photographers, at least not consciously.)

If you’ve never done so, be sure to visit this blog’s companion page, Christianity 201. Both are published 365-days a year!

February 6, 2014

I Was Born a Ramblin’ Man

Filed under: blogging, Church — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 8:26 am

I had a great re-post scheduled here from a blog that will remain nameless. Nameless because I deleted the bookmark accidentally. So instead I will ramble.

If Shakespeare Lived on my Street

The Bard would no doubt write this if he lived in my town yesterday

Shovel, shovel, toil and trouble

The Debate

The religious Superbowl of sorts took place Tuesday night, though I have to confess I watched a replay Wednesday when there were fewer distractions. I think far too much energy is spent on the whole subject of origins. We don’t know, and furthermore we don’t know what we don’t know. I prefer to spend my energy on incarnation and atonement, or to put it in one word, Jesus.

Still people went nuts over this. If you go to blog aggregator Alltop – Christian or its sister Alltop – Church, you should still find lots to read, even today, by doing a page search for “Bill Nye” or “Ken Ham” or “Creation.”  I liked Phil Vischer’s comments, too; and also what Scott Hoezee said at Think Christian about how pastors are now left to mop up the mess. In balance, you should read comments on this outside the Christian blogosphere and Christian Twitterverse, such as this one.

The Christian Equivalent to “I’m Feeling Lucky”

So this is about ramblin, not random, but I did something deliberately random on Monday night.  First, I went to the website of the Fellowship of Independent Evangelical Churches in England. Then I selected a church at random; I chose Aigburth Community Church because I wasn’t sure how to pronounce it and because it was in Liverpool, a town I seem to remember is associated with a musical group of some renown. And then I listened to a sermon on the book of James. A good sermon.

It was nice to hear preaching from somewhere far away; to be reminded that the capital “C” Church is bigger than anything in the United States or Canada; to be made aware of my brothers and sisters across the Atlantic. It was just the message, but they announced a closing hymn, so I hurried over to YouTube and caught I Once Was Lost (All I Have is Christ) which was new to me. I think the song may actually be of U.S. origin.

Donald Miller’s Church Attendance Record

The Blue Like Jazz guy is admitting his church attendance is somewhat spotty. Just doesn’t do it for him.  Justification: “Research suggest there are three learning styles, auditory (hearing) visual (seeing) and kinesthetic (doing) and I’m a kinesthetic learner. Of course churches have all kinds of ways for you to engage God including many kinesthetic opportunities including mission trips and so forth, but if you want to attend a “service” every Sunday, you best be an auditory learner. There’s not much out there for kinesthetic or visual learners.” You can read his whole confession here.  (And no, not the Blue Like Jazz type of confessional.)

The very next day, Thom Shultz posted on The Church’s Male Exodus. David Murrow writes much on this theme in his blog Church for Men, such as this article.

Subway Removing Plastic from Bread

Okay, this one’s a little off-topic, but I’m glad to hear that the chemical that is used to make yoga mats is no longer going to be included in the bread used in Subway sandwiches. ABC News reported, “The World Health Organization has linked this chemical additive to respiratory issues, allergies and asthma, and it is banned in Europe and Australia. Azodiacarbonamide is legal in the United States and Canada.”

for more randomness, catch me over at Twitter

January 21, 2014

The Highest Form of Flattery

Filed under: blogging, writing — Tags: , , , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 9:13 am

Somewhere in the last decade, there was a year or two (or maybe three) where we would download each and every fresh sermon from Rob Bell, convert them to disc, and play them back in the car on long trips.

Some of you disagree theologically with Bell on a thing or two (or maybe three) but his speaking style was unique.

And distinct.

And uniquely distinct.

I don’t know to what degree it might have been noticeable, but if I were asked to speak somewhere, I’m sure there were elements of that speaking style that crept into my own, not unlike the person who spends two weeks in London and returns to Houston with the slightest hint of an accent beginning to form.

More recent downloads at our house include Greg Boyd and Andy Stanley, but Bell’s homilies were always a mix of prose and poetry. Disagree though you might, he is always engaging to listen to. He knows how to get people talking.

It’s the same with writing. I tend to take on the style of the person I’ve been reading most recently. Frankly, if you’re an aspiring writer, or even an aspiring blogger, I can’t stress the value of reading good writers; of reading the best. Want to write better? Then read more.

Oswald J. Smith built Toronto’s Peoples Church into Canada’s first — and for a long time only — megachurch. When he was away on missionary trips, some of which encompassed months at a time, his philosophy was to always book guest speakers that he felt were better than himself.  If you’re an aspiring teacher or preacher, I can’t stress the value of listening to great speakers; of going out of your way to hear the best, especially hearing them in person.

Every Friday night, I have a ritual of catching up with the blog, Best of YouTube. I’ve noticed however that my never-diagnosed ADHD self is most reluctant to commit to videos longer than about four minutes. I tend to watch the short ones and skip the long ones, which lately have been getting much longer. My attention span doesn’t lend itself to War and Peace or a ten-part series on A&E. For that reason, I minimize my own potential to return to school and get that coveted Masters degree, nonetheless I am committed to lifelong learning. I absorb knowledge — and ideas — like a sponge. Books fill the shelves in various rooms, at times lining the stairs; my computer is literally choked with bookmarked articles; and the aforementioned sermon discs fill several spools.

Read the best.

Listen to the best.

To borrow (and misuse) a term from the HTML side of computing, I look for rich text. In computer parlance, rich text refers to text that has been ornamented through bold face, color, underlining, a change of font, use of italics, subscripts, superscripts, and enlargement.

Rich text in speaking or writing could mean something just as intricate and interesting, but I use it to refer to content that is enriched, through cross-reference, powerful illustration, authoritative delivery, passion, and thought-provoking ideas. We live in a time-starved world, so don’t settle for fluff.

And… if you find yourself parroting someone else’s style in your speech or composition that’s not necessarily a bad thing, it might be called the highest form of flattery.

January 17, 2014

Blog Housekeeping

Filed under: blogging — paulthinkingoutloud @ 8:35 am

Link List - Out of Ur

So now that I have this cool banner in my picture file, Out of Ur has been replaced by PARSE. But it looks cool, too; don’t you think?

First link list on PARSE

I like the bold graphics. Only the first link appears on the landing page, when you click through, you get about half of them, and it’s broken up into two pages unless you select “single page.”  Click the image above to browse PARSE.

One Million Served

Meanwhile, back here at Thinking Out Loud, where we don’t know the meaning of the phrase, “new graphics,” we’ve passed the 1,000,000 views mark. Maybe like McDonald’s we should start counting in terms of millions of satisfied customers. I wonder if they cheat and include the cheeseburgers in the hamburger count?

January 2, 2014

The Internet Has Its Own Language

Filed under: blogging, internet, technology — Tags: , , , — paulthinkingoutloud @ 9:11 am

Yesterday I was re-reading the book Eats, Shoots and Leaves, a 2003 book by Lynne Truss about the effects of punctuation on grammar and communication.  A few sections caught my eye:

Electronic media are intrinsically ephemeral, are open to perpetual revision, and work quite strenuously against any sort of historical perception.  The opposite of edited, the material on the internet is unmediated, except by the technology itself.  And having no price, it has questionable value.   (pp 181-2)

What to call the language generated by this new form of communication?  Netspeak?  Weblish?  Whatever you call it, linguists are generally excited by it.  Naomi Baron has called Netspeak an “emerging language centaur – part speech, part writing” and David Crystal says computer-mediated language is a genuine “third medium”.  But I don’t know.  Remember that thing Truman Capote said years ago about Jack Kerouac:  “That’s not writing, it’s typing”? 

I keep thinking that what we do now, with this medium of instant delivery, isn’t writing, and doesn’t even qualify as typing either: it’s just sending.  What did you do today?  Sent a lot of stuff. “Don’t forget to send, dear.”  Receiving, sending and arithmetic – we can say goodbye to the three R’s, clearly.   Where valuable office hours used to be lost to people schmoozing at the water cooler, they are now sacrificed to people publishing second-hand jokes to every person in their email address book.  We send pictures, videos, web addresses, homilies, petitions and (of course) hoax virus alerts, which we later have to apologize for.  The medium and the message have never been so strongly identified. 

As for our writing personally to each other, how often do you hear people complain that emails subtract the tone of voice; that it’s hard to tell if someone is joking or not?  Clicking on “send” has its limitations as a system of subtle communication.  Which is why, of course, people use so many dashes and italics and capitals (“I AM joking!”) to compensate.  That’s why they came up with the emoticon, too – the emoticon being the greatest (or most desperate, depending on how you look at it) advance in punctuation since the question mark in the reign of Charlemagne.  (p. 191-2)

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