Thinking Out Loud

April 22, 2011

Delivered from Death

When you’re in your teens or twenties, or even thirties, you may not think much about death.  With the passing of time comes the reality that the death rate is 100%, and with that comes much uncertainty.

Some of the uncertainty is fueled by all the knowledge we have.  Every night I watch ABC World News with Diane Sawyer, sometimes flipping over to NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams.  There are various health stories on the news to be sure, but it’s the commercials that do me in.  Every week brings a new “condition” — usually described by an acronym — and when you listen to the long disclaimer, the potential side effects of the “cures” seems to make them rather dubious remedies.

In other words, I’m not becoming a hypochondriac — well, maybe I little — but I am becoming too aware of the things in our fearfully and wonderfully made bodies that can break down.

Last week, on one of the blogs, someone wrote about being so medically phobic, he breaks out into a sweat when his wife trims the cat’s nails.  And I think it was one of the Christian bloggers.

Fear and anxiety should not be part of the life of the Christian.  While the communion elements were being passed this morning at the Good Friday service and everyone else was breathing a quick prayer of confession for having downplayed their income on their 2010 tax return, or looking at pornography last night until the wee hours; I was seeking forgiveness for fear and anxiety.

Every year, I write something to the effect that, for those of us who’ve been around for awhile and have had our share of Christmases and Easters, we should look for something new in the Easter story or Christmas story that we didn’t know was there before.  For me, this year, in several of the messages I’ve heard in church or downloaded, it’s been this theme that in Christ’s resurrection we’re not only delivered from death, but delivered from the fear of death.

This quote from yesterday’s post at Christianity 201 — which I encourage you to read — best describes the perspective every Christ follower should have:

…Christ Himself [became] the instrument by which the Father would — for all time — make death not a wall … but a door.

Also recommended: He Took The Nails – at Christianity 201

About these ads

3 Comments »

  1. Thank you for your insights as well as the links to these two excellent articles.

    This Easter I have been taken aback by the number of times I have heard Jesus death referred to as a “murder” on Christian radio. My focus this year has been on the strength it took Him not to call on His strength!

    Happy Easter Paul

    Comment by Cynthia — April 22, 2011 @ 8:46 pm

    • Happy Easter to you as well, and thanks for being such a faithful reader!

      Comment by paulthinkingoutloud — April 22, 2011 @ 9:05 pm

  2. It is now several years ago that I first heard a friend say “I’m not afraid of death – only of what happens before death” At the time it seemed a funny thing to say, but I understand it now. I have spent long hours at loved ones’ bedsides in their last days and I certainly wouldn’t want to be in their places.

    I am not afraid of death, for it is a doorway into an eternity with my Saviour and an eternity of the absence of the presence of sin. I am not afraid of what comes before death either, because I will not walk that path alone – - – but I certainly DO hope for a quick exit!

    Comment by meetingintheclouds — April 22, 2011 @ 9:54 pm


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Don't just stand there, say something!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

The Silver is the New Black Theme Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: